Daily Archive: December 6, 2016

Dec

6

Written by

img December 06, 20164:00 pmimg 0 Comments

How much orange is too much orange?

How much orange is too much orange?

This week, Barnard’s SGA welcomed not one, not two, but three administrative guests. This is by far (well, by one) the largest number of administrative guests at a single this meeting this year. So what happened at this star-studded meeting of the Rep Council? Read on to find out.

Louise Hood, Associate Vice President and Chief of Staff for Development, Alumnae Affairs, and Career Development; Caitilin Tramel, Executive Director for Alumnae Relations; and Robert Earl, Director of Career Development joined SGA in the Diana Cafe to talk about alumnae, careers, and how they go together.

Hood started by describing the logical relationship between alumnae relations and career development. Alumnae serve as mentors to Barnard students in their search for careers, and some are also in recruiting and hiring positions. Encouraging institutional affinity helps students progress in their chosen paths and allows alumnae to a chance to give back.

Tramel followed Hood, and described her position in encouraging alumnae relations. Barnard has over 35,000 alumnae spanning decades, who live across the globe and are in different stages of life. The different alumnae create groups and committees according to their interests, careers, or graduating years. Of special note was “Project Continuum,” which unfortunately doesn’t have anything to do with the bending of space-time, as the name suggests, but is composed of alumnae who graduated thirty or more years ago and maintain active communication and frequent programming. Someday you too may be able to tour Monet’s Garden or present a century of wisdom with your alumnae retiree peers. The Barnard alumnae association also maintains an active directory and listserv that allows members to keep in touch.

More on the exciting world of alumni affairs after the jump

Dec

6

Written by

img December 06, 20162:55 pmimg 2 Comments

ESC is keeping campus running smooth with the latest innovation, tampon boxes in bathrooms campus-wide.

ESC is keeping campus running smooth with the latest innovation, tampon boxes in bathrooms campus-wide.

Tampons, smoking bans, and tree lighting malfunctions, Oh my! A lot happened in this week’s ESC meeting. Let Finn Klauber recount the details of some important, new innovations coming to a bathroom near you very soon.

The student council initiative first spearheaded last year by CCSC President Ben Makansi and VP for Policy Viv Ramakrishnan to provide free tampons and pads to Columbia’s student population won a second round of support last night. In support of authorizing a tripartite, Council-led, pilot program for the upcoming semester, CCSC Executive VP for Policy Abby Porter and CCSC Student Services Rep Sam Safari presented an initiative blueprint already approved by CCSC.

The initiative, Abby and Sam explained, would pick up upon programs already in place at other schools, such as Brown, NYU, and the New York public school system, to stock pad and tampon boxes in specific bathrooms across Columbia proper for public consumption. After meeting with Columbia Health and Scott Wright of Student Services, CCSC attained substantive administrative support for this pilot program in the form of Student Services taking responsibility for installing the sanitary supply boxes in agreed locations. Student council members, in exchange, will take responsibility for collecting data on tampon and pad usage while also restocking the supplies, which the Councils will be responsible for purchasing. The proposed financial burden on each Council would amount to $210.96 from ESC, $622.32 from CCSC, and $221.51 from GSSC—though GSSC will vote upon the proposal later today. However, any money unused in the purchase of sanitary supplies will be returned to the Councils as appropriate. The list of buildings receiving tampon and pad boxes is as follows:

The list of locations after the jump

Dec

6

Written by

img December 06, 20161:03 pmimg 27 Comments

Flyer for the event

Flyer for the event

Tonight at 8pm in Mathematics 312, Students Supporting Israel (SSI), a newly recognized student group, is hosting an event called “Indigenous People Unite.” This event will involve a panel of five speakers representing indigenous peoples from around the world; their nationalities are Assyrian, Yazidi, Israelite, Native Canadian, and Tibetan. According to the description of the event on Facebook, “the thousand year old sacred connection to a piece of land and the constant attempts of destruction and oppression, brings these people together in a discussion centered around pursuing common interests.” Neither the names of the speakers nor their connections to Columbia are provided.

On Sunday, the Algemeiner (a Jewish newspaper) published a piece about this event, including statements from Rudy Rochman, GS ’19, president of SSI. Rochman said that several activist groups on Columbia’s campus “target the average student on campus by playing up and riding on the shoulders of other minority struggles,” and that tonight’s event aims to challenge that perception by including an Israelite in a conversation about other minority struggles. He said that “you can support Palestinian human rights while also supporting the story of Israel — the story of a people who have a right to exist like any native people.”

However, many groups on campus are not so certain that this is the case. This morning, we received a statement from 25 ethnic, national, and cultural campus groups that “stand in solidarity with indigenous people”, including CU Apartheid Divest, Columbia Queer Alliance, Black Students Organization, Chicanx Caucus, and Columbia Divest for Climate Justice. These groups condemn the event, on the basis that “there can be no common interests and no principled solidarity between indigenous people and those who defend and aid Israel’s active project of ethnic cleansing and colonization of the Palestinians and their land.” The statement goes on to claim that “this event masks the catastrophic impact that the state of Israel, with its theft of Palestinian land and lives, has had and continues to have on the indigenous people of Palestine since 1948.”

The statement concludes with a resolution from its signatories to “reject colonialism in every form,” and “call upon the greater Columbia community to recognize the past and present oppression of Palestinians and all indigenous peoples around the world.”

EDIT, as of 2:04 P.M.: Rudy Rochman sent us a response to the statement. He says that the “event has nothing to do with policies, conflicts, or future state solutions, but simply sharing the 4,000 year old history and culture of native people,” and invites all Columbia students to attend. This response, as well as the coalition’s full statement and a list of signatories, is included after the jump.

EDIT, as of 2:26 P.M.: GendeRevolution has now also signed the coalition’s statement; the list of signatories has been updated.

EDIT, as of 10:26 P.M.: Aryeh: Columbia Students Association for Israel has released a statement in response to CUAD’s statement on the SSI event. You can read it fully after the jump.

Full statements and signatory list:

Dec

6

Written by

img December 06, 201610:30 amimg 1 Comments

No scrubs

No scrubs

The hole that was Barnard’s library is entering a new, equally noisy phase of construction, which of course calls for a celebration. TLC Rising (which is the name of the party, not a Marvel sequel or plan to revive a tired television network) will take place today from 11-1:30 at either the hole itself or in the Diana Center lobby depending on the weather. There will be information about the new Teaching and Learning Center, as well as snacks and a special giveaway (maybe some tender love and care?), and an opportunity to sign the first beam to be used in the building’s construction.

Dec

6

Written by

img December 06, 20169:16 amimg 1 Comments

Can I get a J-A-P?

Can I get a J-A-P? Seriously, curious how America will look with a JAP in power. Expecting a Pinkberry in the White House

In a passionate Op-Ed, Christopher Suprun, a Republican Texas presidential elector, announced he will not be submitting his vote to elect Donald Trump. Disappointed that Trump does not believe in Reagan’s “shining city on the hill” model, which Suprun forgets most people don’t believe in, his argument went the way of Reagan’s heart and film career. (NY Times)

The Supreme Court or #SCOTUS tackled racially charged gerrymandering in GOP states like Virginia and North Carolina. It is now up to these states to prove that they redrew state lines because of partisan politics and not because they are racist. (LA Times)

India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi has won the internet poll for Time Person of the Year. In other news, Hillary came in second (again). (The Wall Street Journal)

An exposé on Jared Kushner, President-elect Donald Trump’s son in law,  reveals his Machiavellian and sordid rise to power and revealed him as the person pulling the strings the entire election cycle. (Haaretz)

Photo courtesy of The Wrap

© 2006-2015 Blue and White Publishing Inc.