Monthly Archive: January 2017

Jan

31

Written by

img January 31, 20178:45 pmimg 5 Comments

From the Fed to the Supreme Court?

From the Fed to the Supreme Court?

Earlier tonight, Donald Trump nominated Neil Gorsuch, CC ’88, for the Supreme Court of the US. Gorsuch currently serves as a judge on the US State Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit, nominated by George W. Bush. If his nomination is supported, he will take the seat vacated by Justice Antonin Scalia. While at Columbia, Gorsuch founded The Federalist and wrote columns for the Spectator.

Some of Gorsuch’s notable writing includes columns for Spec about South African divestment and the CU Marching Band. All of his columns can be accessed on Spec’s archives.

Gorsuch via Wikipedia Commons

Jan

31

Written by

img January 31, 20176:27 pmimg 1 Comments

img_6434Disclaimer: this post is written by an international student who knows essentially nothing about American Greek life. This is a parodic description of the sorority rush process as perceived by Daily Editor Youngweon Lee, a clueless foreigner.

The rush process begins about a week before the results are announced. (N.B. the word “rush,” in this context, means to join, not to hurry.) In other words, aspiring sorority members have a week to impress these organizations and convince them to pick them as their “sisters.”

About 500 girls put on heels and cute clothes and do their makeup nicely, then stand in a room to be judged on the Sunday when the rush process starts. Some of the categories of competition include racing in heels, dance-offs, who-makes-the-dg-arm-sign-the-best, and a quiz on what these Greek letters stand for. Scores are subsequently tallied, and contestants with the lowest scores are eliminated.

This exhausting process continues throughout the week; sometimes the sororities give the girls white wine to cheer them on. (There are various rituals involved as well. Legend has it that one of these rituals apparently involved a cup, and a fraternity stole said cup, and now the sorority and fraternity are waging war against each other. Over a cup.)

How does this whole thing end?

Jan

31

Written by

img January 31, 20173:26 pmimg 2 Comments

Amsterdam in the evening.

Amsterdam in the evening.

We know Butler, Avery, and the gaping hole in Barnard’s campus that once was Barnard Library. Bwog continues to review amazing libraries by taking a look into the Social Work Library!

Location: 2nd Floor, School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue (between 120th and 121st). Accessible library.

Hours: Monday, 10 AM to 8 PM. Tuesday-Thursday, 10 AM to 9 PM. Friday-Saturday, 10 AM to 6 PM. Sunday, 12 PM to 8 PM.

Contact: (212) 851-2194, socwk@library.columbia.eduhttp://socialwork.columbia.edu/the-student-experience/student-support-services/social-work-library/

Seats:

  • Total: ~100 Seats (including seats in reading and group study rooms)
  • Carrels: 8 Seats
  • Comfy Chairs: 14 Seats
  • Computers: 25 Seats
  • Tables: 32 Seats
  • VHS TVs: 2 Seats
  • Seats for Talking: ~15 (There are multiple group study rooms available)

More about the library

Jan

31

Written by

img January 31, 20171:24 pmimg 0 Comments

Yasmine Ergas discusses struggles of establishing women's rights in Tunisia with Yadh Ben Achour.

Yasmine Ergas discusses struggles of establishing women’s rights in Tunisia with Yadh Ben Achour.

Columbia hosted a lecture featuring Yadh Ben Achour, a member of the UN Human Rights Committee that focused on women’s rights in Tunisia and the making of a new constitution that ensures equality under law. Gender equality is only the beginning for Tunisia and other countries that are taking steps towards social modernization.

In the aftermath of the revolution, Tunisia adopted a new constitution that enshrined equality between men and women in law. Guest speaker Yadh Ben Achour was a member of the UN Human Rights Committee, which was the lead author of the recent Tunisian constitution. He spoke at the law school yesterday about the struggles of gender justice reform in Tunisia. Before Prof. Ben Achour started his short lecture, professor Yasmine Ergas, lecturer at the School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) gave him an introduction.

Yadh Ben Achour is one of the world’s most prominent human rights lawyers, humanist and advocate for women’s rights and human rights in Tunisia and around the globe. He was involved in the resistance against Ben Ali and resigned from his role in the constitutional council in 1992 due to Ben Ali’s attempt to control the constitutional process. He is the former president of the High Authority of the Tunisian Revolution and a professor at the University of Catharge. His most recent work includes the publication of Tunisia: a Revolution in an Islamic Country.

More on women’s rights in Tunisia after the jump

Jan

31

Written by

img January 31, 201711:30 amimg 3 Comments

Too many administrators are probably scarred from stepping on these as a kid.

Too many administrators are probably scarred from stepping on these as a kid.

Columbia University has been known for exhibiting one of the worst stress cultures at any university in the country. Executive Vice President Sidney Perkins has plans to create change through legos and other de-stress initiatives. It’s up to the Columbia Administration to decide the future of our community. 

Engineering Student Council led one of its most intriguing sessions yesterday after Executive Vice President for Policy Sidney Perkins introduced his “Resolution on the Community Dissonance between Student Leaders and Administrators, which Contributes to a Culture of Stress on Columbia’s Campus.” Before explaining this resolution, included below, I believe it important to clarify the context leading up to Perkins’ (theatrical) presentation of his resolution. Last week, Perkins reported on the Columbia Administration’s rejection of his proposal to place legos in Carleton Commons. He expanded upon the parameters of that rejection last night, beginning with the scope of his “lego plan.” During our Fall Break, Perkins gathered some of his childhood legos (and some other non-lego-looking playthings), labelled the box at the MakerSpace, and presented his self-funded “destress station” to what he thought would be enthusiastic and cheery administrators. Instead, the unfeeling cogs of the Columbia Administration shattered his idealism.

In response, the Administration demanded a fully outlined proposal with information regarding who will maintain the lego box, who will set up the “destress stations,” and who will ensure everything is being used correctly. Despite acquiescing to these bureaucratic dictates, Perkins stated that the proposal “was ruminated upon for about a month and then rejected,” with the Administration stating that Perkins’ plan was an “inappropriate use of space.” The Administration’s treatment of Perkins drove him to contextualise the legos conundrum in a theatrical introduction to his “Resolution on Community Dissonance.” While emphatically shaking the box of legos, Perkins stressed that this resolution “addresses more than legos, though [he] thinks legos is the test case.” Without a working projector, Perkins read aloud the resolution, further extending the captivating performance.

What did the resolution say?

Jan

31

Written by

img January 31, 201710:01 amimg 0 Comments

The wise Alexander Hamilton once said, "Those who stand for nothing fall for anything."

The wise Alexander Hamilton once said, “Those who stand for nothing fall for anything.”

Happening in the world: The White House took a step back from Trump’s ban on immigrants, clarifying that people with  green cards would be exempt from the rule that would ban them from entering the country. Officials claimed that ony 109 people out of the 325,000 travelers that enter the United States were effected by the executive order in the first 24 hours. President Trump, criticized for his actions, defended himself when writing, “This is not about religion — this is about terror and keeping our country safe.” (NY Times)

Happening in NYC: Two men were arrested for being involved in a Ponzi scheme that involved wealthy individuals to invest in ticket businesses for big shows such as Hamilton and Adele performances. Both were released on bail but are expected to face criminal charges for fraud and conspiracy. (ABC 7)

Happening on campus: Today is the opening of the Harper & Brothers to HarperCollins Publishers: A Bicentennial Exhibition in Butler’s Rare Book and Manuscript Library! It’s open to the public and will be on display until the end of the semester. (Columbia University)

Overseen/Overheard: “One of my favorite stories about cocaine… not that I have any experience with cocaine, mind you, I don’t know anything personally about cocaine…”

Music Pick: Childish Gambino’s, “Awaken, My Love!”

The cold hard truth via CNN

Jan

30

Written by

img January 30, 20178:01 pmimg 0 Comments

What did you put in YOUR mouth this weekend?

What did you put in YOUR mouth this weekend?

Well friends, it’s that time of the week again. Another Monday spent wishing you didn’t spend all day yesterday in bed sleeping off a wicked hangover instead of working in Butler. Oh, wait—that’s just me? Well, I’ll be damned. In that case, here’s what everyone else did this weekend.

What did you put in your mouth this weekend?

  • Shoved a soup dumpling in my mouth and burned my entire tongue.
  • Had home-cooked food for the first time since the semester began.
  • Baked blueberry muffins but didn’t get to eat any of them because gastritis/not home.
  • Went to Chinatown and took wine shots which still, sadly, fucked me up.
  • Convinced some friends to go all the way to Flushing to get hot pot with me as a birthday lunch. (The combined subway time was longer than the combined eating time.)
  • Ate a gyro in Hungarian on Saturday night with surprisingly little judgement.
  • Had amazing escargot.

So much more after the jump!

Jan

30

Written by

img January 30, 20176:14 pmimg 0 Comments

No ban, no wall!

No ban, no wall!

UPDATED 7:06 p.m:

Hundreds gathered on Low beginning at 5 pm this evening to protest Trump’s immigration ban. The protest lasted until 6:20 pm (though scheduled to end at 6). Starting now, protesters are taking the subway to 59th Street and Columbus Circle to march downtown. This march will include students from five different NYC colleges.

The protest included speakers from various campus organizations, including the Muslim Students Association, CU Iranian Society, and several others; as well as undocumented students and professors.

One speaker demanded, “Where’s Lee Bollinger? Shame!” and announced, “We call upon the Columbia administration to stand up against this shameful executive order.”

A professor noted that, “Islamophobia and antisemitism are two sides of the same coin.”

A member of CU Iranian Society said, “We have students here who are unable to go home. We have students abroad who are unable to come back.”

Muslim Students Association announced their support for those affected by the ban, as well as solidarity with other minority students. They will be hosting a prayer service on Low on Friday from 1:00 to 1:45 pm.

A flyer was handed out at the event, associated with the twitter account AcademicsVsBan, asking protesters to sign a petition of academics against the immigration ban. Over 200 Columbia/Barnard professors have signed the petition.

Two helicopters hovered over the area for a large part of the protest, and several reporters/news vans are lined up outside the 116th street gates.

The event was advertised on Facebook as hosted by the Graduate Workers of Columbia union, with over 3.4 people invited, 1.1 k attending, and 760 interested.

You can check our twitter account for live updates, as well as a live video of some of the speakers.

Photos via Sarah Dahl and Betsy Ladyzhets

Jan

30

Written by

img January 30, 20175:00 pmimg 1 Comments

Bwog turns 11 today!

Bwog turns 11 today!

HAPPY BIRTHDAY BWOG! Today, you’re 11! We’ve had so much fun together over the years, and we’ve loved watching you grow into the confident and poised young blog you are today. Here’s to many more years together!

Today, this January 30th of 2017, Bwog turns 11. And what a beautiful 11 years it’s been. We here at Bwog thought today would be the perfect day to say THANK YOU to all our wonderful, classy, sophisticated, and dedicated readers. Without you, we wouldn’t be where we are today. Below we’ve compiled some of our favorite comments from over the years—not to brag, but we just really wanted to show off the love you’ve given us! We’re grateful every day.

See the comments after the jump.

Jan

30

Written by

img January 30, 20172:59 pmimg 0 Comments

The room where it all happens (a.k.a. the Satow Room in Lerner)

The room where it all happens (a.k.a. the Satow Room in Lerner)

Interested in reporting on what Columbia College Student Council does in their meetings? Want to see if our elected reps actually get anything done (and hold them accountable if they don’t)? Join Bwog and become our new CCSC Bureau Chief! The job entails attending the weekly CCSC meetings on Sunday nights and then writing about what happens for the next day.

If you’re interested in the position, send an email to board@bwog.com telling us why you want to report on CCSC!

Jan

30

Written by

img January 30, 201712:04 pmimg 0 Comments

Hey girl, wanna learn to email like me?

Hey girl, wanna learn to email like me?

Always wanted to write like PrezBo but just not quite sure how? Bwog’s got answers. From careful analysis of past administrative emails, we’ve learned several tips and tricks to writing an inoffensive yet meaningful message to the student body of an university in the face of a troubling political event, like the one that occurred Friday. Our template can be applied to other administrators with slight changes, including, but not limited to: Deantini, Dean Hinkson, DSpar, and provosts and registrars.

Firstly, you should probably write the message at least 24 hours after the national event has occurred. Any sooner, and it will be obvious that you didn’t actually spend any time writing the email. For example, in the case of Trump’s ban on immigration last Friday, PrezBo’s appropriate response was sent Sunday at 12:54 a.m. This is an excellent time to send emails, as most students probably won’t receive it until the morning, limiting its shock value and potential for offense.

You’ll want to use vague yet profound adjectives at the start of paragraphs. Some favorites are “many,” “fundamental,” “practical,” “essential,” “critical,” “important,” “interesting,” “concerning,” and “intriguing.”

You should also organize your email in a clear manner, likely through delineating your points (even though said points may seem neither distinct nor separate) with numbers. I.e. “first,” “second,” “third,” and so on.

What other special touches are there to sound just like PrezBo?

Jan

30

Written by

img January 30, 201711:02 amimg 0 Comments

Columbia's Campus on a sunny day, looking northwest from near Hamilton Hall

A happy community is a healthy community

Last night, Bwog senior staff writer Ross Chapman sat in on the semester’s second CCSC meeting. The main discussion was one that the student body has been increasingly pushing for: productive ways to increase and sustain mental health on Columbia’s campus.

Columbia College Student Council dedicated Sunday’s general body meeting to mental health, and encouraged students to come to discuss practical policy changes that would benefit the community. Even with the lure of light refreshments from Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, few extra students came to voice their opinions—two GSSC representatives in the gallery accompanied two CC students and two administrators, including Dean Cristen Scully-Kromm. This would not deter CCSC from taking the missions of aiding student mental health and running with it. Their enthusiasm brought them 40 minutes over the allocated hour and a half, and CCSC ended the meeting with far more vague propositions than they had concrete plans to move forward.

CCSC spent about twenty minutes on updates, the full content of which is available after the jump. Most notably, Abby Porter reported that CCSC received tampons and pads last week for use in their gender-neutral menstrual health campaign, which circumvents the current process of receiving free tampons and pads in the Columbia Health offices on the third floor of John Jay. The next twenty minutes were dedicated to small breakout groups for brainstorming ways to help students with mental health. Specifically, they wanted to talk about suicide. CCSC did not shy away from the word, which rarely appears in statements from Dean Valentini or President Bollinger. When the general body reconvened, they went 70 rows deep into a spreadsheet listing possible solutions, which will be made available along with the meeting’s minutes.

Many representatives believed that increasing the availability of trained assistance would help the student body. Increased CPS and Nightline hours, additional training for RA’s and academic advisers, and the introduction of wellness advisers and peer counselors all came up as possibilities. Others wanted to eliminate stressors: reduced penalties for unexcused absences (especially in Core classes), a larger grace period than 24 hours for moving out after your final exam, and a reduction of required graduation credits were just some ideas floated at the meeting. Increasing the credit count of classes, one representative noted, would make the four-class semester a practical reality for students who did not have abundant access to AP exams, easing the course load on students who also have to work jobs to attend Columbia. None of these mentioned plans, nor any other ideas proposed Sunday night, were acted upon. Nicole Allicock referred to this as an “incubator-style meeting,” which will assist a task force in figuring out exactly what to do.

Check out more details and updates after the jump.

Jan

30

Written by

img January 30, 20179:03 amimg 0 Comments

"Big Brother is literally watching you." -Robert Trump, Donald Trump's younger brother

“Big Brother is literally watching you.” -Robert Trump, Donald Trump’s younger brother

Gooooood morning, Columbia! Rise and shine! I know everybody is just as excited about this week as I am. And by that I mean I’m not excited at all, dear God let me sleep, I just want some peace and quiet, etc. Here are today’s top announcements.

Happening in the nation: 1984, a dystopian novel written by George Orwell in 1949, is currently at the top of Amazon’s Books Bestseller List. It appears as though the general public has finally made the association between Orwell’s fraudulent, manipulative, and horrifying state known as Oceania and Trump’s America. (Amazon)

Happening in NYC: Yesterday, thousands filled Battery Park in a mass protest against President Trump’s immigration ban. New York Senators Chuck Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, along with New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, all spoke at the rally, emphasizing their opposition to President Trump’s new policy. (CBS New York)

Happening on campus: Happy Bid Day! Today, hundreds of Barnumbria girls will receive bids from their favorite sororities after a long recruitment weekend. So, if you hear endless screaming and crying coming from Lerner Satow while you’re trying to enjoy your Ferris lunch in peace, you’ll know why. They’re just celebrating their newfound bestsisterfriendsforeveromgalphadeltaomegapibetaforever.

Overseen/Overheard: “You come up quite a bit in our ESC groupme.” Hmmmm… I wonder who the lucky individual is.

To kick off your week: 

 

Photo via Open Culture. 

Jan

29

Written by

img January 29, 20173:49 pmimg 0 Comments

cropped-taichi-1-2While the US and the world go to shxt, less than a fifth of the population on Earth celebrates the coming of a brand new year. While there is darkness and horror, there will always be light. While there is evil, there will be benevolence. While rumors about Spec’s business practice circulate, Bwog will be in Lerner 505 tonight at 7 pm. Come to us, bring your pitches, write, make grammatical mistakes, read heinous comments and do it all over again.

Jan

29

Written by

img January 29, 20172:00 pmimg 0 Comments

Girl power

Girl power

Bucket List represents the intellectual privilege we enjoy as Columbia students. We do our very best to bring to your attention important guest lecturers and special events on campus. Our recommendations for this week are below, and the full list is after the jump. If you notice any events that have been left off the list, or if you have a correction, please let us know in the comments.

Recommended

  • “Gender Justice Reform in Tunisia” Monday, January 30, 1:20 – 2:40pm. Jerome Greene Hall. Yadh Ben Achour.
  • “Challenges and Opportunities of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals” Tuesday, January 31, 6:00 – 8:00pm. Cristina Gallach (MIA ’86), Tegegnework Gettu (MIA ’83), Navid Hanif (MIA ’91).
  • Film Screening and Discussion: “An Aquarium in the Sea: The Story of the New York Group of Poets” Tuesday, January 31, 7:00 – 9:30pm. IAB. Oleksandr Fraze-Frazenko.
  • “POWER TALK with Athena Distinguished Fellow Shiza Shahid” Tuesday, January 31, 7:00 – 8:30pm. Sulzberger Parlor. Shiza Shahid.

(more…)

© 2006-2015 Blue and White Publishing Inc.