Daily Archive: February 25, 2017

Feb

25

Written by

img February 25, 20176:40 pmimg 1 Comments

Jerome Greene Hall, meeting place of the University Senate

Jerome Greene Hall, as usual, was the place to be yesterday afternoon. The place was packed with both senators and literary references, which was the perfect mix for Bwogger Nadra Rahman. 

February’s University Senate session was brief, centering mostly on faculty initiatives and concerns. While the Student Affairs Committee (SAC) updated the Senate on student space and mental health initiatives, no new proposals were introduced on their end. The star of the event had to be the letter written by Faculty Affairs Committee (FAC) co-Chairs Robert Pollack and Letty Moss-Salentijn, in response to PrezBo’s email on President Trump’s refugee and immigration policy.

“We Know No One at Columbia Who Is Not Upset”
PrezBo’s letter, sent on 1:00 am on January 29, positions the University as a defender of core American values, and in particular, of students affected by the so-called Muslim Ban: “It is also true that the University, as an institution in the society, must step forward to object when policies and state action conflict with its fundamental values, and especially when they bespeak purposes and a mentality that are at odds with our basic mission.” He added, “We have learned that generalized fears of threats to our security do not justify exceptions to our founding ideals.”

In response to these sentiments, Pollack and Moss-Salentijn crafted a letter “from the heart,” which was endorsed unanimously by FAC last month. The letter begins with references to 1984 and Fahrenheit 451 (of course), but eventually meanders to the thesis, which is that faculty members need space to assuage their anxieties and to express themselves in this uncertain political climate:

What’s up with this letter, huh

Feb

25

Written by

img February 25, 20174:06 pmimg 0 Comments

Imagine an opera but like in Barnard Hall.

Although he doesn’t often go to arts events, Internal Editor and Late Nite Extraordinaire Finn Klauber last night tried his hand out going to a “real” arts event. Although he had only been to Barnard four or five times in recent memory, he found his way to Sulzberger Parlour and the symphonic recital that was awaiting him in that lacquered and effeminate den.

Up until the minute I entered Sulzberger Parlour in Barnard Hall, I had no idea what exactly a “heteronormative to homoextraordinary recital” would actually consist of. The event description seem to just be a smattering of artistic buzzwords interspaced between the names and works of Romantic composers and poets—for all I knew, of course. Entering Sulz Parlour didn’t help to orient me in any way, unfortunately, as the patterned walls illustrated with decorous songbirds, the pseudo-realistic portraits of Barnard presidents, and the Gilded Age furniture all clashed with the modern femininity which Barnard so effortlessly projects.

As I silently pondered whether a broken grandfather clock being placed directly in the cold stare of portrait-Debora Spar were some sort of political statement, the star of the evening, Brenda Patterson, began her introduction. Patterson, an acclaimed mezzo-soprano opera singer and alumna of Juilliard and Barnard, was to perform three different cycles of music: an adaptation of Schumann’s “A Woman’s Love & Life,” with new lyrical poetry adapted from Emily Moore, a performance of a selection from Berlioz and Gautier’s Les Nuits d’Eté, and a new performance of a selection from American songwriter Ricky Ian Gordon.

What was the thematic push in Patterson’s singing?

Feb

25

Written by

img February 25, 20172:18 pmimg 0 Comments

Beef soup noodle personified

Staff Writer Timmy Wu reviews Zuo Jie, one of the Chinese food trucks on Broadway, just outside of College Walk. 

For most of the Southeastern/East Asian student population, the Chinese/Thai Food Cart and M2M on Broadway are both indispensable parts of their college life in Morningside Heights. Of course, there is a multitude of authentic and wonderful eateries in K-Town, Chinatown, and Flushing, but amidst the already-cumbersome school work, there really isn’t any reasonable justification to spend four hours to-and-fro for a sudden bout of gastronomical gratification. This is where Chinese Food Cart comes into the picture. Being 7000 miles or so away from home, these food carts are temporal portals through which thousands of soy-sauce-acquainted taste buds may taste their homeland and find solace. However, do these food trucks live up to their 7-dollar-a-banton responsibility?

I will admit that the weather yesterday was so nice that it felt like a treat, rather than a nuisance, to be standing in line for 15 minutes for the Zou Jie (左記)food cart. Being a significantly smaller cart than, say, the Luo Yang Uncle (洛陽大叔) Food Cart, the owners of Zuo Jie have to compromise their efficiency. Their workstation seems rather awkward but not without a system of their own. As I saw the couple (I presume) crossing over or interlacing with each other every 20 seconds, I couldn’t help but pry: “How long have you been here?” “Three years,” the wife reluctantly answered after a few moments of gauging my intention. I wondered what it would be like to work skin-to-skin in, essentially, a metallic box about the size of one-and-a-half bathroom stalls. More importantly, how does that kind of experience factor into Zuo Jie’s flavors?

vicariously eating after the jump

Feb

25

Written by

img February 25, 20171:07 pmimg 2 Comments

We love NYU, and we think they’re great, but sometimes our NYU friends like to remind us that we live in an area of town where you can find half of the school’s population in exactly 2 bars on a Saturday night, while they’re downtown roaming around Greenwich Village. (At least my NYU friends do. Is this just a me phenomenon?) I was curious to see if NYU students really have more fun than us, so I asked a few real-life NYU students what they do on a typical Saturday night, and actually spent last Saturday night with a few of them.

First, here’s how last Saturday night went. I took an Uber to West Village with my friend, got my left frontal helix pierced at a tattoo shop on Bleecker Street, and sat in a dorm room in University Hall drinking beer, gin, and tequila and watching basketball with a few boys. Then we met up with their friends and PAID to get into Bar 13 ($5 for girls, $10 for boys: sexism at work?), and left almost immediately because it was very unlit. We stopped by Duane Reade to get a 12-pack of beer, then finished them off on our walk to The Jane. There was a line around the corner, and the NYU friends told my friend and me that it would be worth it, but I was skeptical. When we finally made it to the front, our fakes got denied, and we were asked to leave the building. We Ubered back to West Village? Greenwich Village? and went to some sweaty bar called Pourhouse, which was pretty much exactly like an EC party except bigger than an EC suite, and you had to pay (a lot) for drinks. I lost everyone when I went to the bathroom, so I walked to my friend’s dorm and crashed there.

Read first-hand NYU accounts of downtown nightlife

Feb

25

Written by

img February 25, 201711:20 amimg 0 Comments

the original Broadway playbill

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

Saturday, February 25th

  • Naach Nation XV, 7:00 PM, Roone Arledge Auditorium – “Naach Nation is an annual South Asian fusion dance charity showcase hosted by Columbia Taal – Columbia’s South Asian classical fusion dance team. Naach Nation XV will be held on Saturday, February 25, 2017 at Roone Arledge Auditorium. This year’s show will feature performances by Adelphi Sapna, Binghamton Masti, Brown Badmaash, Boston University Khatarnak, Queens College Fanaa, University of Chicago Bhangra, University of Massachusetts Dhadak and Columbia Taal.” – Tickets here; $5.00 with CUID, $8.00 day of
  • The Loving Story, 7:30 PM, Teachers College – “Oscar-shortlist selection THE LOVING STORY is the definitive account of Loving v. Virginia—the landmark 1967 Supreme Court decision that legalized interracial marriage.” – Tickets here; $11.00 with student and senior, $13.00 other

Thursday, March 2nd

  • Silent Matinees: A Star is Born, 12:00 PM, Room 511 in Dodge Hall – “Professor Vito Adriaensens presents a five-part silent cinema matinee series with live music by Belgian jazz musician Adriaan Campo and friends. In this third screening, come marvel at the talents of one of the world’s first international super stars, Mary Pickford. Modern technology is put to shame in Stella Maris, as Pickford tackles not one but two main roles in this touching pictorial drama. Be sure to bring your hankies!” – Free
  • The Mystery of Edwin Drood, 8:00 PM, Lerner Black Box – “The Mystery of Edwin Drood is a musical based on Charles Dickens’ unfinished murder mystery novel of the same title. This show is a hilarious, interactive whodunit mystery musical that allows the audience to enter the action and become the ultimate detectives by having them decide who the murderer is and how the show ends. Staged in a meta-theatrical manner by the Music Hall Royale, a traveling Victorian theater troupe full of just as many colorful characters as the roles they play, this charming and inventive musical is sure to intrigue and entertain any musical or mystery lover.” – Tickets here; additional shows on Friday, March 3rd and Saturday, March 4th, both at 8:00 PM
  • CU Players Presents: The Fairytale Lives of Russian Girls, 8:00 PM, Glicker-Milstein Theatre – “CU Players presents The Fairytale Lives of Russian Girls intertwining reality with classic Russian folklore, and seamlessly placeing them within a single world where we face evil witches, angry bears, and potatoes with minds (and eyes) of their own. This show is about magic, movement, fantasy, and the dark twisty bits of the mind. But more than that, this is theatre that begs to be done in a post-inauguration world: we have found witches where we were expecting grandmothers and bears where we were expecting boyfriends. This show imbues courage that tells people this is not the time for running away or hiding. This is the time to stand up and fight. This is a show about taking action.” – Tickets here; additional shows on Friday, March 3rd and Saturday, March 4th, both at 8:00 PM
  • Pericles, Prince of Tyre, 8:00 PM, Minor Latham Playhouse – “Incest and intrigue, pirates and prostitutes, bitter revenge and providential reunions: Shakespeare’s collaborative Pericles was popular in its day, scorned by Shakespeare’s great rival Ben Jonson, and mysteriously omitted from the 1623 collected edition of his plays. Shakespeare’s first, experimental foray into stage tragicomedy, Pericles embodies the attractions of early-modern popular theatre, and provides a uniquely challenging work for contemporary performance. ” – Tickets here; additional shows on Friday, March 3rd at 8:00 PM and Saturday, March 4th at both 3:00 PM and 8:00 PM

Shakespeare via Philip Chetwinde

Feb

25

Written by

img February 25, 201710:03 amimg 0 Comments

Columbia Housing lottery number for the Waldorf Astoria: 90/0001

Happening in the Nation: Many major news organizations, including CNN, The New York Times, and BBC, were barred from a White House press briefing on Friday. This move by the Trump administration struck journalists as unprecedented. (CNN)

Happening in New York City: The Waldorf Astoria, arguably New York’s most famous hotel, is shutting down on Wednesday for remodeling, to be reopened in a few years as a much smaller hotel with more residential apartments. (The New York Times)

Happening on Campus: To continue observance of Black History Month, Teachers College is hosting a film screening of The Loving Story, “the definitive account of Loving v Virginia – the landmark 1967 Supreme Court decision that legalized interracial marriage.” The film screening will happen tonight at 7:30pm. Tickets may be purchased here for $11.

Overheard: “… and that’s why I deleted my Grindr.”

Your New York 4-day forecast (sponsored by Spring, your favorite season):
Saturday (Scattered thunderstorms) – High: 58, Low: 36
Sunday (Sunny) – High: 46, Low: 35
Monday (Sunny) – High: 57, Low: 44
Tuesday (Showers) – High: 56, Low: 48
(Disclaimer: weather prone to changes, obviously)

The Waldorf Astoria via Hennem08 

© 2006-2015 Blue and White Publishing Inc.