Daily Archive: March 3, 2017

Mar

3

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Is this brutalism or am I just being an idiot again

Once upon a time, the Glicker-Milstein Theatre was just a nice old theatre living the rest of its retired life in peace and service. However, that has all come to change — the Glicker-Milstein’s position in the landed gentry is now challenged. Barnard has announced that their new learning center will be named The Cheryl and Philip Milstein Teaching and Learning Center, in honor of alumni/a Trustee/a Trustee emeritus. It is becoming ever clearer that only one Milstein can live. Who will it be?

Name
The Cheryl and Philip Milstein Teaching and Learning Center: Named after Board of Trustees vice chair and alumna Cheryl Glicker Milstein BC ’82 and trustee emeritus and alumna Philip Milstein ’71, this so-called Center has a lot to live up to. Not to mention it’s not just a Center, it’s the Center.
Glicker-Milstein Theatre: I was just about to say that I have no idea where the name Glicker-Milstein came from (and I can’t find it on Google), but now that I think of it, it came from Cheryl. Or both Philip and Cheryl. In other words, the theatre is probably named after the same people the Center is named after. Not sure where I was going with this.

Winner: Glicker-Milstein Theatre because it is more fun to type.

The TLC tries to make a comeback with a jab, cross, jab, uppercut combination after the jump

Mar

3

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Loretta Mester & Belinda Archibong in Sulzberger Hall

Let me tell you something about the economy…

As the latest in a series of Power Talks with successful Barnard alumnae, the Athena Center invited Loretta Mester, BC ’80, to talk about her experience as the President and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. The talk, introduced by Athena Center Director Kathryn Kolbert and moderated by Assistant Professor of Economics Belinda Archibong, hit some common talking points of female empowerment, but spent much of its Q&A time mired in the details of economic policy.

Despite her current job in economics, Mester came to Barnard with an interest in math, which she picked up in her Baltimore-area public school. She credits Watergate, which occurred the summer before her first year at Barnard, with giving her an interest in policy. Seeing Econ as a mixture of math and policy, and noticing that the Barnard economics major was only eight courses (compared to today’s 12), Mester double majored in Economics and Mathematics. She applied to graduate school for mathematics, but was convinced by a few letters from Princeton University to apply her math skills in economics. From this serendipity, which led her to her current success, Mester drew the first lesson she imparted on the evening – “Be open  to things that you’re not expecting to come.”

More Mester and her views on her experience as a woman in the Fed after the jump

Mar

3

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Yeah, this is the whole library

In the last installment of our library review series, Bwog reviews Journalism Library, the smallest library on campus. This library might be considered a “hidden gem”, or it might be considered too small to bother with – you decide.

Location: Pulitzer Hall, first floor. Go inside the Student Center and turn left.

Hours: 10 am to 8 pm Monday through Thursday, 10 am to 6 pm on Fridays, closed on Saturdays and Sundays.

Contact: (212) 854-0390; [email protected]http://library.columbia.edu/locations/journalism.html.

Seats: Five total; four at a circular study table, and one a computer desk.

What amenities does this smallest library ever have?

Mar

3

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When it is neither quite reality nor digital

Happening in the world: After an agreement to share power with the U.K. did not go through in January, Northern Irelanders voted yesterday to elect a new 90-seat assembly. However, this move may not be enough to fend off U.K. direct rule. (Bloomberg)
Happening in the Big Appz: The 23rd Armory Show features a work that uses Microsoft’s HoloLens to “merge the virtual and physical worlds in order to create something real, yet digital” (I mean, no shit!). You can view the work from March 2-5 at Piers 92 & 94 in Manhattan. (Fortune)
Happening on campus: Tomorrow from 7 to 9 pm at Barnard, the Black History Month Committee of CU will be hosting a panel of professional Black women called BlackGirlMagic and will also provide a networking hour and free giveaways.
Overheard: “Now, this is something Joan Miró gave me when I interviewed him.”
Shitty horoscope of the day Today, ingenious Uranus faces off with growth-oriented Jupiter. While new ideas might seem contrary to your well-being, get some goddamn sleep. This also applies whether or not Uranus is facing off Jupiter.

Tenor Trombone in B-Flat via The Met

Mar

3

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Everyone loves hugs. That’s a fact. If you think you don’t love hugs, you’re wrong. You probably just don’t like hugs from strangers or something. Or people around you just don’t know how to give good, proper hugs.

I saw the perfect hug outside of Butler 209 the other day. It made me feel happy for a straight week afterwards from just witnessing it, it was that good of a hug. A girl who was slightly taller than me (she looked to be about 5’6″) and a guy who was a full head taller than her were hugging each other, and the guy was leaning into her, putting his entire body weight on her. Their arms were tightly wrapped around each other: a real intimate hug, not a formality hug. The serene, happy expression on his face gave me the feeling I get when I eat a big bowl of really good pasta. Although I had hundreds of pages of reading to do, and it was fairly late at night in Butler, I was perfectly joyous from just looking at that goddamn hug and I couldn’t stop smiling like a fool! Now imagine; if that hug had that kind of effect on me, a mere bystander, no more than a longing witness, how happy would the actual participants have been?

Further analysis after the jump

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