Daily Archive: March 8, 2017

Mar

8

Written by

img March 08, 20178:00 pmimg 1 Comments

It’s that time of the year again: major declaration. For those of you who can’t wait until your entry on the all-knowing Directory is updated, and thus put weight on your studies—this one’s for you. Choose your own adventure below, and see if it matches up to the major that you (hopefully) have declared by now.

Mar

8

Written by

img March 08, 20176:00 pmimg 0 Comments

Reverend Vivian Nixon

The Community Scholars Lectures are the product of a partnership between the Columbia School of Professional Studies and the Office of Government and Community Affairs. In their second lecture of the year, which took place on March 7th at Low Rotunda, Reverend Vivian Nixon, Executive Director of the College and Community Fellowship, Columbia University Community Scholar and formerly incarcerated woman, delivered her talk “ Voices From Inside America’s Mass System of Punishment: The Freeing Power of Higher Education.” Staff Writer Gloriana Lopez surrounded herself with real adults and decided to not write about basketball for once in her life.

“The United States makes up less than 5% of the world population and yet comprises 25% of the prison population. Incarceration rates are higher even though crime rates are down, and a study by the NAACP states that black people are 6 times more likely to end up in prison than their white counterparts. If the trend continues 1 out of 3 Black children born now will end up in prison.” Dean Jason Wingard of the School of Professional Studies preceded Vivian Nixon by stating these facts. There is no justifiable reason for these numbers, according to Wingard, and he explained that Carter, Reagan, and Clinton’s “War on Drugs” might have contributed to such a phenomenon. Education, Wingard continued, plays a crucial role in stopping these patterns; as Victor Hugo said, “he who opens a school closes a prison.” Mass incarceration has been proved to not have any benefits, so why keep it? These are the issues that Reverend Nixon would tackle in her lecture.

Education is a freeing activity that can lead to the decarceration movement. People talk about the relationship between the system of punishment and race, class, gender, political suppression, and religion, yet they only do so by talking about each of these factors separately. Doing so, Reverend Nixon said, does not give a full understanding of the complexity. She explored these ideas through the unconventional research of experience, in which her story and those of the people she encountered in prison as well as in her work were the basis of her argument.

She began her explanation with the story of her life. Vivian Nixon grew up in a wealthy community in North Shore Long Island and was from a working class family, whose jobs consisted of being laborers for the wealthier people. Her grandmother was a midwife for the Rockefeller and the Guggenheim families and her parents were involved in the Civil Rights Movement. For them the Civil Rights Movement meant finally achieving equality whereby they had the “bootstrap mentality,” and they thought that success meant having a good job that provided benefits. Nonetheless, Nixon mentions, the rhetoric of bootstrapping is based on privilege: the privilege of having boots and that those boots have straps.

More about bootstrapping and mass incarceration after the jump

Mar

8

Written by

img March 08, 20173:00 pmimg 0 Comments

All these saved, empty seats

You did everything right to mark your territory and make sure you have a reserved space in the always-full ButRef (a.k.a. Butler 301, The Reference Room, or “the big room on the third floor”), but some self-righteous selfish asshole one-upped your own self righteous selfish assholery, moved your things to the side, and took your seat. Even though it says all over Butler that you should not mark your territory as you did, and you probably really should not leave your stuff for more than 2 hours to reserve your spot, you are still enraged at this person’s audacity. So we present you with a guide on how to get your seat back, depending on who took your precious ButRef seat.

  1. Anyone with a pile of books including the Iliad, Aeneid, Don Quixote, Inferno, etc.: This person is obviously a freshman or the occasional transfer sophomore in LitHum. Hold out a scary, advanced-looking, big, thick textbook that asserts your upperclassman status (if you are also a freshman, do this regardless to pretend you are an upperclassman) and nicely but firmly ask for your seat back. If you can intimidate them while being polite enough, they will probably give you back your seat. If they don’t leave, tell them there’s a party at Beta right now and they should go check it out.
  2. The obviously tired and hassled engineer: You honestly can’t help but feel bad for them. They probably have multiple problem sets, calculator(s), and formula sheets in front of them. Offer them a coffee or a Red Bull and a cookie, and nicely ask for your seat back.
  3. The English major with a pile of James Joyce-related books: Look up their books. Find out they’re overdue. Report them to the circulation desk (which just so happens to be right next to the Ref Room for your convenience) and get them kicked out.
  4. The Philosophy major with Sartre/Kant/Mill-related books: Wait until they leave for a smoke, and reclaim your seat. Your wait time will be inversely proportionate with the size of the stack of books, and with the number of Sartre-related titles.
  5. Person on social media: Politely tell them that you could make much better use of that seat than them. Overwhelm them with the guilt of procrastination and lack of productivity. Point out your pile of books and papers that scream “WORK! ACADEMICS! PRODUCTIVITY!” until they leave.
  6. Obvious grad student who looks like they are at least 26 and only go to Arts and Crafts because they’re too good for every other MoHi bar: Start by politely asking for your seat back. If they point out that you left your stuff there for 6 hours, start talking more and more loudly until they decide they’re too old and mature to be arguing with some undergrad about a stupid seat in Butler and leave.
  7. Person who is sleeping: They’ll be disoriented when they first wake up, so take advantage of that. Wake them up and tell them it’s current-time-plus-five-hours-o’clock, and add that this is your seat. Create an atmosphere of distracting disorder, as you flit around the person and pack and unpack your own things. This will prompt them to subconsciously gather their own things and leave.
  8. Someone with a Canada Goose/Moncler/similarly expensive coat: Grab their coat and run. They’ll chase after you. Drop their coat in a place that’s far enough that they can’t outrun you back to ButRef, run back faster than them, and reclaim your seat.
  9. Yellow Sweatshirt Butler Guy (his name is actually Daniel): He lives in Ref. You can’t get your seat back.

Many empty, claimed seats via Youngweon Lee

Mar

8

Written by

img March 08, 201712:00 pmimg 0 Comments

Can Bwog come to gala? Just kidding the tickets are sold out.

GSSC Bureau Chief Romane Thomas provides the scoop on what GSSC talked about in this week’s meeting, which includes gala ticket confusions and mental health issues.

Last night, General Studies Student Council met in the Lerner Satow Room to clear up confusion about gala tickets and announce some upcoming events.

Silin Chan and Raisa Flor, with the help of Nicole Rodgers, announced the creation of a Friend to Friend training program. This program is meant to train council members on stress management and suicide prevention and will take place on March 23. The policy team also spoke about the recent well-being and mental health workshop organized by the mental health task force. This workshop led to some productive conversation about “challenges and opportunities to increase mental well-being” said Flor. A report will compile the conclusions from this workshop. Lastly, the policy team announced that constitutional review was well under-way and that they would be meeting every Tuesday at 6:30pm after spring break to continue the progress. Raisa Flor invited all who were interested to come and give their input.

MilVets, gala tickets, and more after the jump

Mar

8

Written by

img March 08, 201710:58 amimg 0 Comments

The Barnard SGA Campus Life Committee and Barnard McAC are hosting a farewell event for the late Maggie the Magnolia today from 11am to 3pm outside of Liz’s Place. There will be pink candles, buttons, and a magnolia-themed photobooth. The event is also meant to honor Maggie’s long legacy at the school on International Women’s Day. Come out and say goodbye to Maggie before she leaves campus!

 

Rip Maggie via Barnard Campus Life Committee

Mar

8

Written by

img March 08, 20179:00 amimg 0 Comments

Happening in the world: Poachers killed a beloved 4-year-old male white rhino, Vince, who was kept in the Thoiry Zoological Park in France. There is a very high demand for rhino horns especially in southeast Asia and China, where they are considered status symbols, an aphrodisiac, and a miracle drug. (Chicago Tribune)

Happening in NYC: NYC Public Advocate Letitia James proposed a plan that would ban companies involved with Trump’s southern border wall construction from doing business with NYC. James also said that she would request the city’s employee pension board to look at the possibility of divesting from firms participating in the project. (Newsday)

Happening on campus: Columbia is working on expanding resources for mental health and suicide prevention, but students remain mostly unsatisfied, because many students, including University Senator Sean Ryan, think that Columbia’s efforts and proposals are not enough. (Gothamist)

Overseen: 

A sad, abandoned crutch outside of Hamilton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An old celeb tweet: 

me too

© 2006-2015 Blue and White Publishing Inc.