Daily Archive: April 13, 2017

Apr

13

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This could be you before your fiery death

It’s 8 am and you hear the worst sound known to humanity: the unmistakable sound of the fire alarm. You’re not sure how to react to the drill, and you’re not even sure if it’s a drill in the first place! Bwog is here to help you with your dilemma of what type of person you should be in a fire drill.

1. Sleeping in: You were already planning on skipping your 8:40 and there’s no way some measly fire drill is gonna stop you from getting your eight hours. You crack one eye open to get a feel for your surroundings and drag yourself out of bed to shuffle around to find your headphones. You find the perfect soothing playlist on Spotify and snuggle back into bed for another few hours, only slightly worried that this could be your fiery death.

2. Take it seriously: You hear the blaring screeches of the alarm and you jump out of bed, struggle to find some clothes that aren’t dirty and run for your life because THIS IS NOT A DRILL. You know from all your years of mandatory safety class that one should never take the elevator during a fire, so you rush to the stairs, even if you live on the 16th floor of Schapiro (rip).

Find out your other options during a fire drill!

Apr

13

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Professor Adina Ciugureanu

Yesterday, Professor Adina Ciugureanu from Ovidius University in Constanta, Romania, gave a talk on the legacy of the Roman poet Ovid in the Black Sea. Bwog’s resident Classics majors, Youngweon and Finn, attended the talk and learned some things about Ovid.

The majority of the scholarship on Ovid, as Professor Gareth Williams commented, is centered around Western Europe and America, and his time in Rome; his time in exile in the Greek city of Tomis, present-day Constanta, Romania, doesn’t get as much attention. In this talk, Professor Ciugureanu gave an interesting perspective on Ovid in talking about his influence on the region that he was exiled to, as well as the influence that his exile in itself had on literature and philosophy.

Professor Ciugureanu started the lecture with a brief introduction on Ovid and his life; Ovid, known as Ovidius to Romans, was a poet who lived under the reign of Augustus. He was born to a well-to-do Roman family, and got an elite education in Rome. He traveled to Greece and Sicily as part of his education, as was customary during the time for the children of the Roman elite, and took a job in the public sector afterwards. However, to the disappointment of his father, he discovered that he didn’t like that very much, and instead dedicated his life to writing poetry. His first serious work was the Amores, which is a series of erotic poems about himself and Corina, his imaginary love interest. He then went on to write Epistolae Heroidium (or Heroides, as students of LitHum may know it as), a series of imaginary letters from mythological heroines to their lovers, Medicamina Faciei (“The Art of Beauty” – a book about cosmetics), Ars Amatoria (“The Art of Love” – sex advice for Roman lovers), and the Metamorphoses, an extensive collection of mythological stories all of which which involve a kind of metamorphosis, beginning with the creation of the world and ending with the chaos after Caesar’s death and the Augustan peace that followed.

What happened next in Ovid’s life?

Apr

13

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The weather is just right to play this sport!

Last week, Bwog decided what fake sports Columbia students would be good at. Sports Editor Ross Chapman took it to the next level and created an entirely new sport for you to play now that the weather is nice. Maybe Columbia can come first in the Ivies in this one?

So, this one is pretty simple. It’s half footrace, half frisbee golf, played in two teams of 5. The goal is to be the first team with every player on the Scholar’s Lion in front of Havermeyer. Every round begins at the top of the Hamilton stairs (West side, of course).

The first member of the team, playing the Parachute position, goes down the stairs. Sounds simple, right? The trick is, the Parachute must declare when they begin their descent a student walking down the stairs. They may not descend faster than said student – if they pass them, they will receive an offsides penalty, and be docked one flight of stairs in the race. Parachutes don’t have to pick the first student who walks by, so reading the student is a key element of the Parachute’s skill. Parachutes may re-declare once per game, but only when behind the other team’s Parachute. The Parachute role emphasizes a Columbia Student’s ability to swiftly and smartly navigate their class schedule.

Still curious how to play?

Apr

13

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So much text, so little Kate

Kate Gilmore, the United Nations Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights, spoke at the Law School yesterday afternoon on the transformative nature of human rights. Managing Editor Betsy Ladyzhets, a human with rights, gives her take on the speech and the discussion that followed.

Few things make me feel cooler than successfully getting into the Law Library without attracting suspicion. Once I found my way downstairs and into a lecture room, however, I soon felt that any coolness I may had acquired paled in comparison to that of the speaker, Kate Gilmore, a UN Deputy High Commissioner and wearer of [stunning] pink pants. Her introduction extolled her past accomplishments, as Assistant Secretary General and Deputy Executive Director Assistant Secretary General and Deputy Executive Director for Programmes with the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), and Executive Deputy Secretary General of Amnesty International.

Ms. Gilmore’s speech yesterday was a keynote address marking the end of a speaker series commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Her speech was a powerful rhetorical address challenging the nature of human rights discourse in the world right now, and calling the students in the room to action.

What did she say?

Apr

13

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Detroit is a beautiful city.

Happening in the World: Protests in South Africa continue for the second week against President Jacob Zuma, who has experienced a string of scandals recently.

Happening in NYC: Sheila Abdus-Salaam, the first African-American Muslim woman to serve as a judge on the New York State’s highest court, was found dead in the Hudson River on Monday.

Happening on Campus: The Jewish Activist Collective is hosting a screening of Detroit Minds Dying, a movie about the recent water crisis in Detroit.

Overheard: “I think all my homosexual tendencies just stem from the fact that I’m a narcissist.”

Bad Joke: “What do you call someone who derives pleasure from the bread of affliction?” “A matzochist.”

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