Daily Archive: December 1, 2017

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This Thursday, the Alexander Hamilton Society hosted a debate on the Iran nuclear deal featuring panelists David Phillips, Director of the Program on Peace-building and Rights at Columbia’s ISHR and a former UN and US State Department adviser, and Danielle Pletka, a Vice President for Foreign and Security Studies at the neoconservative think-tank American Enterprise Institute. Free Five Guys was offered as well.

With the event advertised as a “very fiery debate,” perhaps the fieriest aspect of this debate was the unexpected amount of bad jokes. Phillips opened the discussion by conceding that while the event was conceived as a debate, his “training and temperament [was] in conflict resolution,” drawing sustained guffaws from the audience. Nevertheless, this “conflict resolution” later proved unnecessary as the event went on and Phillips and Pletka both realized they held similar views.

Asked to comment on topics like President Trump’s simultaneous non-certification and non-termination of the JCPOA deal, as well as what their ideals of a better yet still realistic situation looked like, both panelists came to the conclusion that they agreed on many points: that Trump’s current handling of the affair is a non-strategy, that the deal is better than no deal but still holds many flaws, and that while Iran’s nuclear capabilities are disabled in the short run, they still possess much of the infrastructure needed to develop nuclear weapons in the long run.

More jokes, quotes, and actual policy viewpoints after the jump

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Deputy Editor Youngweon ranks frat houses on how ugly they are based on her own arbitrary standards. This list goes from least ugly to most ugly.

8. Delta Sigma Phi: The exterior looks surprisingly clean. Nothing about this building is particularly ugly. It’s really unremarkable. The little alcove (for lack of a better word) thing that sticks out on the first and second floors is cute, so bonus points for that. The windows are not highly ornamented but rather decorated with simple lintels. Someone who didn’t know that this was a frat house may even call it elegant. The more intricate cornice keeps it from being too boring. The plain cement base that makes up the first floor and the metal bars of the windows are a little off-putting, but all things considered, that’s a small defect. The fact that the building is comprised of three different materials (the cement base, the whiter, larger stones of the second story alcove, and the narrow bricks of the rest of the building) can either be annoying or exciting, depending on how you look at it. The cornice above the door is also a nice little addition.

They get worse and worse from here

Dec

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“Please don’t make me read and review a journal article you wrote in high school.” – The professor

It’s finals time, and the inevitable panic that sets in when you look at your lax notes will probably lead you to beg for mercy during office hours. While waiting for those 5 minutes you have to discuss everything that has been taught in class, you will face some human obstacles. Staff writer Megan Wylie warns you of one of the most dangerous archetypes: the ‘try hard.’

The ‘try hard’ is unfortunately not a rare character at Barnumbia. A frequent voice in class, they have a unique skill that gives them the confidence to ask a question in a 100 person lecture and turn it into a full-on conversation. Despite this tactic, they choose to arrive a full thirty minutes early to office hours in order to sit themselves down in front of their professor’s door. The bleak two hours that your professor holds office hours is your chance to butter them up before they grade your research paper, or maybe you just want to learn a bit about them.

The try hard goes to office hours, however, for a different reason. They trek to SIPA and bother their tenured professor just to make sure their busy educator knows about their knowledge of early German literature and how it relates to the curriculum. Plot twist: it doesn’t. Despite the uselessness of their visit, they make sure to spend a solid 45 minutes babbling on about how they disagree with their professor who has a doctorate in the field. They hold a conversation with the professor for as long as they can, however, it’s not so much a conversation as it is a one-sided critique of what historical academia deems to be true.

So what else do they do?

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An Econ student, probably, hard at work on his Gulati problem set (2017, Colorized).

If you’ve crawled out of Butler isolation recently to check the news, you might have seen this rather interesting in-depth NYT profile of an American Nazi. In fact, the article inspired us here at Bwog to take a deeper look into one of the everyday faces of Columbia University: a Columbia Econ major. Bwogger Zack Abrams investigates

Eric Johnson arrived at Columbia University this fall. He got in early. On his shopping list were a Canada Goose jacket, a lint brush, and a set of sharpened pencils.

Ms. Johnson, his mother, was worried about activist groups protesting his arrival. Going to college is hard enough to plan when your son is not an expected econ major.

But Eric, in the days leading up to his arrival, was somewhat less anxious. There are times when it can feel toxic to openly identify as a center-right economist in the Columbia of 2017. But not always. He said the election of President Trump helped open a space for people like him, demonstrating that it is not the end of the world to be attacked as the free-market idealist he surely is: “You can just say, ‘Yeah, so?’ And move on.”

It was a weeknight at the local steakhouse in Scarsdale, a town in Westchester, a few weeks before move-in day. The Johnsons were shoulder to shoulder at a table, a family in love. He was in a gold-buttoned blazer, she in a Moncler puffer. She ordered the salmon. The going-away party would be small. Some of Ms. Johnson’s friends were going to be there. “A lot of girls are not really into the writings of Keynes,” she said.

At Columbia, amid the manicured lawns and vaping students, the pizza places and Shake Shacks, Mr. Johnson’s presence can make hardly a ripple.

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Barnard has joined as an affiliate of labor rights organization Worker Rights Consortium (WRC), which will help Barnard create a code of conduct ensuring that collegiate apparel is not produced in sweatshop conditions.

Nearly 200 colleges are currently part of WRC, including Columbia University since the 90’s. Since September, Student-Worker Solidarity (SWS) has been fighting for Barnard to join WRC, a goal that it brought up in its visit to SGA. This process has passed relatively quickly and without the drama accustomed to bureaucracy, with SWS’s proposal being converted to administrative action within a few months.

Read the full announcement on the website or below:

President Sian Beilock announced that Barnard College will join more than 190 other colleges and universities nationwide as an affiliate of the Worker Rights Consortium. The WRC is an independent organization devoted to helping colleges and universities improve the conditions of workers around the globe who produce their apparel. The affiliation will assist Barnard in implementing a manufacturing code of conduct, with which apparel vendors contracting with Barnard will be asked to comply.

The decision to affiliate with the WRC arises from semester-long conversations with Barnard’s Student Government Association and the student organization Student Worker Solidarity. Chief Operating Officer Rob Goldberg, who will oversee implementation efforts, has worked with students since September to discuss the benefits of joining WRC and how best to enforce fair labor standards as part of Barnard’s vendor agreements.

“Joining the WRC is consistent with Barnard’s commitment to the ethical purchasing of goods and services,” Goldberg said. “We appreciate students’ willingness to work with us on this important issue.” Barnard’s vendor code of conduct is nearly final.

Once complete, it will be integrated into The Barnard Store’s apparel practices, as well as shared with any group planning to purchase Barnard apparel.

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Because we know you can never get enough of sexual empowerment and creativity, come make a Zine to express your sexual self at an AllSex x Zine Club event today!

The Zine making will take place from 3-5 pm at Lefrak Library. More information can be found at the Facebook event here.

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All I want for Christmas are some goddamn berries in the dining halls.

Happening in the World: Japan’s Emperor Akihito will step down from his position on April 30, 2019, making Akihito the first Japanese monarch in two centuries to voluntarily leave his position – a decision announced by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Friday. (CNN)

Happening in the US: After reports of extramarital affairs, Rep. Joe Barton of Texas has declared Thursday that he will not run for another term to represent the Dallas-Fort Worth District. (Washington Post)

Happening in NYC: A Snickers survey has found that New York is the hangriest state of the United States, with New Yorkers’ hanger (hangriness?) peaking at 2:15 pm on Mondays. (The Week)

Happening on Campus: A public lecture by Jill Tarter and a stargazing session is taking place from 7-9 pm today in Pupin, hosted by Columbia Astronomy Public Outreach. If the 7-9 pm time window seems daunting, the hosts say you may “stay only as long as you want.” More information can be found at the Facebook event here.

Overseen: 

 

A stapler in a Wallach elevator. I get the socks and even the underwear, but like….a stapler? Why?

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