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Daily Archive: February 13, 2018

Feb

13

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There is nothing that staff writer Jake Tibbetts loves more than cafeteria-style buffets, and there is nothing that he despises more than unreliable technology. Like any rational human being, Jake believes that the best way to address Columbia Dining’s failure to keep its online menus updated and accurate is to air his grievances online. He’s got a lot of problems with the Dine@CU app, and now you’re going to hear about it.

Expectation vs. Reality

For me, an unabashed carnivore who has pledged himself to #teamjohnjay, Meatless Mondays have never been easy. Regardless, I’ve always been willing to do whatever it takes to get by. Because I’m a stubborn man who refuses to accept the constraints that Big Veggie seeks to impose on college students, I often find myself strolling into enemy territory (i.e., Ferris Booth Commons) on Monday evenings in order to load up on something that at least somewhat resembles poultry. When I woke up on February 12th, 2018, I opened the Dine@CU application to see what was going to be served for dinner in Ferris, and I was genuinely excited by what I saw. I surprisingly couldn’t wait to stop at Ferris in between evening classes to dine on herbed chicken, plantains, sautéed kale, baked yams, and rice pilaf. When I arrived later that evening, though, I was confronted by a terrible sight. Fifty or sixty hungry Columbia students were standing in line to fill their plates, but there was neither any chicken nor any plantains nor any kale nor any yams in sight. Instead, the dinner station was occupied by trays full of pork Italian sausage with peppers, beef meatballs in marinara sauce, “cous cous” pilaf, spaghetti with parsley, and broccoli with olive oil and garlic. Disappointed, I rushed over to the soup station, hoping to find the split pea with ham soup that Dine@CU promised me. Once again, I discovered that I had been lied to: Ferris was serving a chili and a chowder, but the soup in question was not being offered.

If this were an isolated incident, I would take it in stride. Crying over one instance of missing soup is, after all, equivalent to crying over spilled milk. Sadly, however, the Dine@CU application is so ridden with incomplete and faulty information that I have come to expect to be disappointed every time I walk into a dining hall.

Read more about about food-related disappointment here

Feb

13

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Once again, Barnard Bureau Chief Dassi Karp sat in on Barnard’s Student Government Association meeting. This week, she reports on University Senate updates, endowment proposals, and the ever-present technological difficulties.

We all know how to use these, so please do so.

The main focus of the evening was a presentation by Barnard University Senator Kira Dennis, joined by one of Columbia College’s University Senators, Josh Schenk CC’19. They were there, according to Kira, because “a lot of the time my job seems a little sketchy,” and they wanted to fill in the non-Senator plebeians. The University Senate is made of 108 representatives of students, faculty, administration, and staff from across the University. Barnard has three representatives: one student, Kira, and two faculty: Lisa Northrop, Chair of the Physical Education Department, and Professor Mignon Moore of the Sociology Department. The representatives sit on various committees to discuss University-wide decisions and policies. The committees cover a wide range of issues. Kira sits on the student affairs committee and the committee on diversity.

Schenk described some of the Senate’s recent initiatives, which include discussions about mental health, disabilities, and grad student unionization; a reorganization of space in Lerner Hall to provide more casual spaces for students to build community; and the recent vote to affirm the University’s current policy on academic freedom. Fascinatingly, the Senate has also been considering changes to the University’s relationship policy. Currently, all students are permitted to have romantic relationships with professors, as long as they are not their direct supervisors. Of peer institutions, only Cornell and Penn have similar policies. Students have proposed a policy which bars undergraduates from these romantic relationships but, as Schenck explains, “it’s still very controversial. Not all faculty members support the change.”

Kira apologized for the amount detail provided, because “that was a lot of Columbia lingo for us Barnard students,” but our brilliant representatives were familiar with concepts like “Lerner Hall” and “academic freedom” despite their insular Barnard ways. It’s almost like the University Senate discusses University wide issues and Barnard is a college in the University.

Laundry, Mealshare, and more votes

Feb

13

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With the dreaded Vday right around the corner, those of us without an S.O. might be feelin’ kinda down (or not, since contrary to popular belief, not everyone here is a sad boi/sad girl). But if you’re curled up in bed watching the Bachelorette and wishing that were you, fear not, because Galentine’s Day is the real holiday we should be looking forward to. A night out with the girls is always the best time, and there’s plenty to do in Morningside Heights this February 13th (Or any other day, really. Who needs a special occasion to love yourself?). So, Bwog has come to the rescue and compiled a list of the best things to do around Morningside Heights this holiday season.

Image result for treat yo self gif

1) Have a spa day with the ladies in your dorm room. Nothing like face masks and manicures, and maybe some Netflix on this cold winter day.

2) Go catch a movie at the Magic Johnson theater with your best friends. Guaranteed to be a fun time; the theater is usually pretty empty and the tickets are significantly cheaper than at the 84th street theater.

3) Go ice skating at Lasker Rink in Central Park (108th street)! Just look away from the giant Trump signs while you’re there.

4) Go for a nice dinner out at Le Monde or Marlow Bistro: just some fan favorites in the local area.

5) Hit up Yoga to the People on 103rd street for a pay what you wish yoga session. Totally worth the 12 block walk.

6) If you’re into jazz, SMOKE has some amazing shows. Though it can be a bit pricey, Galentine’s day is the perfect time to splurge on the things you love.

7) Last, but not least, my personal favorite. Treat yourself to some junk food (and maybe some edibles) and enjoy a nice night in with your gals watching a rom com… or a superhero movie. Whatever floats your boat.

Feb

13

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All of us here at Bwog, when ESC faced yet another impeachment motion this week.

Every Tuesday, Bwog brings you a recap of the previous night’s Engineering Student Council (ESC) meeting. Deputy Editor Jenny Zhu stepped in to report on this week’s ESC meeting, which oversaw some classic ESC hits like Eweek plans, emergency contraception updates, and (e)mpeachment of the president.

President Aida Lu

After her meeting with Scott Wright, Facilities’ VP for Campus Services, President Lu introduced the plan to allow individual students to reserve rooms in campus spaces like Lerner and academic buildings, via University Event Management (UEM). Ideally, these rooms would be bookable for individuals or small groups of 5 to 10 people in the same way Butler study rooms are. She also let ESC know that since Lerner rooms were updated with new technology, the council has been charged for using the Satow Room’s projector, but members will probably be able to eventually just operate the projector “by themselves.” President Lu’s updates on her meeting with COI were kept off-the-record.

VP Policy Zoha Qamar

VP Qamar provided updates on the joint initiative she’s spearheading, alongside CCSC 2021 Rep Aja Isabel and CCSC 2020 Rep Danielle Resheff, to supply free pads and tampons in campus bathrooms and increase accessibility for those in need. As established at yesterday’s CCSC meeting, the initiative’s pilot program last year found that 30 products were being used a day, but Facilities argued for a less-accessible vending machine of menstrual products instead. VP Qamar urged ESC to sign and share a petition backing the original plan.VP Qamar also suggested rolling out the long-discussed emergency contraception vending machines in John Jay lobby, which wouldn’t require swipe access.
Political intrigue and impeachment motions after the jump.

Feb

13

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Angelica GLOWS!

Name, Year, School, Major:
Angelica Lagasca, Sophomore, Columbia College, Bio
Preference:
dudette for dude
Hometown:
duuuuuuuuuuuval
Your nightmare date in seven words or fewer:
he venmo requests
What redeems you as a human being?:
i get trail mix in bulk
Library room of choice:
business library. In this house we turn profits
Beverage of choice:
oatmeal
Which dating apps have you been active on? (Be honest.)
bumble
Where can you usually be found on a Saturday night?:
confusing myself
Historical Hottie:
Trotsky. Surviving an assasination attempt by ice pick is kind of hot

Name, Year, School, Major:
Rose Z., 1998, The Barnyard, Who fuckin’ knows, bitch
Preference:
Girl for girl
Hometown:
I’m omnipresent, actually
Your nightmare date in seven words or fewer:
Anywhere I have to dress fancy
What redeems you as a human being:
I’m gay
Library room of choice:
Altschul atrium
Beverage of choice:
Jasmine green tea
Which dating apps have you been active on? (be honest):
None. It’s physically impossible to take pictures of me so I can’t make any profiles.
Where can you usually be found on a Saturday night?
Playing Dungeons and Dragons
Historical Hottie:
They’re all too old for me

 

Images via Bwogger Angelica and Rose Z

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Feb

13

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France post-liberation, signaling the near end of World War II in Western Europe.

Despite the fact that she had a history class until 5:25, Bwogger Victoria Arancio was ready for another dose of modern European History by 6. Not only did she learn the name of “that weird orange house next to Low,” but she learned more about how historians treat political transparency. 

After a nice leisurely stroll around campus, I found my way into Buell Hall for the a panel discussion and book talk centered on Stefanos Geroulanos’ recent book, Transparency in Postwar France: A Critical History of the Present. Geroulanos, an Associate Professor of European History and the Director of the Center for International Research in the Humanities and Social Sciences at NYU, focused on Europe’s  political atmosphere in the 20th century with input from other panelists: all Columbia professors. Professors Ayten Gundogdu, Turkuler Isiksel and Thomas Dodman helped bring the discussion into the American sphere, directing questions towards global historical context during the Cold War. With political transparency seen as a national issue today, the panel drew its own conclusions on the Trump Administration.

Geroulanos began the discussion with modern examples of what transparency has become in the 21st century. At the beginning of President Barack Obama’s first term in 2009, one of the first things that he aimed to accomplish was to make the federal government more transparent, following a loss of faith in the Bush Administration and foreshadowing challenges with what would be the Great Recession. Similarly, former Prime Minister David Cameron of Great Britain made transparency his priority back in 2010, making the government more accountable, responsible, and open. Geroulanos argues that there is an “apparent use of transparency as a political tool” that attempts to celebrate the ideal while doing the opposite. Today, it is difficult to find examples of transparency that aren’t politically motivated.
Hit me with the hard facts

Feb

13

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What’s Happening In The World: People born in the 2000s are doing better than literally all of us at the Olympics: Snowboarders Red Gerard and Chloe Kim, both 17, took home gold medals for Team USA this week. This is when I start wishing my parents had gotten me into sports. (NBC)

Hardly what I was doing at 17.

What’s Happening In The US: Have you ever written a paper, realized it was totally insane and didn’t make any sense, but handed it in anyway? That’s what Trump just did with his new budget plan, which would add $7 trillion to the deficit and cut billions from public broadcasting and the EPA. And just like your shitty paper, it has little to no chance of passing. (NY Times)

What’s Happening In NYC: I thought there couldn’t be a more irrelevant Trump than Tiffany, but apparently someone else found one, and maybe tried to poison her? Donald Trump Jr.’s wife Vanessa was rushed to an NYC hospital yesterday after opening an envelope filled with white powder, which turned out to be nonhazardous. Um, ok. (NBC New York)

What’s Happening At Columbia: It’d be really cool if Migos performed at Columbia (@ bacchanal), but until that happens, we’ll settle for homophones: The Mivos quartet is playing at the Miller Theatre tonight from 6-7:30 pm at an event that promises to showcase original works by the musicians themselves.

Feb

13

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Early Monday afternoon, the Graduate Workers of Columbia-UAW (GWC-UAW) released an open letter to President Bollinger, in which it declared to hold a strike authorization vote if the university did not honor the union’s existence.

As part of graduate students’ 3-year-long struggle to unionize on Columbia’s campus, this letter comes as a response to Columbia’s January announcement that it would not recognize GWC-UAW, and instead would take the case to a federal court. In its call for Columbia’s recognition, GWC-UAW cited its broad-based support from students, faculty, RAs, student councils, TAs, and alumni alike.

If Columbia continued refusing to recognize graduate student unions, GWC-UAW stated that it would “hold a strike authorization vote.” While this act does not necessarily directly constitute a strike, it is a significant step in, and an indicator of GWC-UAW’s willingness for, organizing a strike that would greatly impact campus operations.

 

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