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Daily Archive: February 25, 2018

Feb

25

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We’ve all gotten drunk texts from friends, exes, and sleazy fuckboys. But what would those texts look like if they were coming from the president of Columbia himself? Bwog has imagined a few possibilities, and… they aren’t pretty.

Screenshots via fake itext message

Feb

25

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Betsy on Low the next time it’s warm out

At last week’s meeting, one Barnard Bwogger came to the pitch table with an honest question: how does one make guy friends at Columbia? EIC and fellow Barnard student Betsy Ladyzhets (who has made some very good guy friends at CU) is here to answer that question. Note: some pieces of this advice are more serious than others.

1. Join a student group with guys in it. This tactic is most successful if the group is a. related to something you’re passionate about and/or b. a group that has a significant time commitment, such as long field trips or frequent rehearsals. The first will help you make friends because other people in the group will have similar interests to you (always good grounds for friendship), and the second will help because spending a significant amount of time with someone always leads to bonding.

2. Hang out in Ferris a lot. Don’t just eat in Ferris. Study in Ferris. Nap in Ferris. Live in Ferris. Camp out at one table for an entire Saturday, and wait for guys to ask if they can sit with you when peak hours hit. When they do, strike up a conversation — by the end of the day, you’ll have befriended at least one.

3. Follow Columbia guys on Twitter. You can tell a lot about someone from their Twitter account, including whether or not they’re friend material. Because most Columbia students are proud enough of going here to include that information in their bios, it’s not too difficult to find a few potential friends with a quick search. Like a few tweets, DM a couple of vaguely Columbia-relevant memes, and soon you’ll be getting invites to their Carman parties.

More advice after the jump

Feb

25

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“Branch” out and go to these events!

Bucket List represents the intellectual privilege we enjoy as Columbia students. We do our very best to bring to your attention important guest lecturers and special events on campus. Our recommendations for this extremely busy reading week are below. If you notice any events that have been left off the list, or have a correction to make, please leave them in the comments.

Recommended:

  • Jerusalem Lives: At the Palestinian Museum and Beyond. A conversation with Reem Fadda, Emily Jacir, and Beshara Doumani, 6:00 PM, International Affairs Building, Monday
  • The Counterrevolution: How our Government Went to War Against its Own Citizens – Bernard Harcourt
  • AWAKENING OUR DEMOCRACY: Beyond#MeToo, 12:00 PM – 1:15 PM, Wednesday
  • The Desacralization Of Revolution And Anti-Revolution Consensus: The 2017 Anniversary And Its Political Use / Non-Use, 12:00 PM – 2:00 PM, International Affairs Building, Thursday

Monday, Feb 26:

  • Jerusalem Lives: At the Palestinian Museum and Beyond. A conversation with Reem Fadda, Emily Jacir, and Beshara Doumani, 6:00 PM, International Affairs Building

Tuesday, Feb 27:

  • Book Talk: “The Peacenik and the Spook as the Diplomatic Avant-Garde”, 12:15 PM – 2:00 PM, International Affairs Building
  • The Counterrevolution: How our Government Went to War Against its Own Citizens – Bernard Harcourt

Wednesday, Feb 28:

  • Islamic Education and the ‘Diaspora’: Religious Schooling for Senegalese Migrants’ Children with Dr. Hannah Hoechner, Visiting Scholar IAS / Postdoctoral research fellow, University of Antwerp, 12:10 AM – 2:00 AM, Knox Hall
  • AWAKENING OUR DEMOCRACY: Beyond#MeToo, 12:00 PM – 1:15 PM
  • Exhibition From Da Ponte to the Casa Italiana: A Brief History of Italian Studies at Columbia University, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM, Casa Italiana
  • Lynnette Regouby – Threshold: Generations of Change in Botanical Practice at the end of the Ancien Regime, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM, Fayerweather Hall

Thursday, March 1:

  • Queer Disruptions II, March 1 – March 2, Jerome Greene Annex
  • Turkey and Thailand: Unlikely Twins Revisited, 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM, International Affairs Building
  • The Desacralization Of Revolution And Anti-Revolution Consensus: The 2017 Anniversary And Its Political Use / Non-Use, 12:00 PM – 2:00 PM, International Affairs Building
  • SEAS Colloquium in Climate Science (SCiCS), 2:45 PM – 3:45 PM, Mudd Hall
  • Energy, Economics, and Geopolitics in the Gulf Arab States, 4:30 PM – 6:00 PM, Low Library
  • Rhetoric and Evidence in a Polarized Society, 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM, The Diana Center

Friday, March 2:

  • Learning From Romantic Poetry: Njegoš For Beginners, Or The Limits Of Interdisciplinarity In Area Studies, 5:45 PM – 7:45 PM, International Affairs Building

 

Leaves of Grass via Pexels.

Feb

25

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as interdisciplinary as it gets!

We’re back with Science Fair, Bwog’s weekly curated list of interesting STEM-related talks, symposiums, and events happening on campus. For science and non-science majors alike, our list will bring you events that will satisfy your scientific curiosity for everything from astronomy to zoology, and everything in between.

For anyone, related-majors and non-majors alike:

  • House for King and Slave: Patients and Medical Practice in the Medieval Islamic Hospital” (Monday, February 26, 6pm, Heyman Center for the Humanities)
    • “This lecture series will explore the enigma of how what we write relates back to the experience of bodies in different stages of health and disease. Our speakers will explore how the medical humanities build on and revise earlier notions of the “medical arts.” At stake are the problems of representation and the interpretation of cultural products from the past and present through medical models.”
  • Film Screening: “A Dangerous Idea” (Tuesday, February 27, 7:45pm, 501 Schermerhorn)
    • “A documentary about genetics, eugenics, and the American Dream,” film screening organized by the Research Cluster on Science and Subjectivity (RCSS), free snacks!
  • Transparency, Fairness, and Privacy challenges with targeted advertising in social medias” (Tuesday, February 27, 2:30pm, CS Conference Room)
    • “In this talk, we present three key challenges with social media advertisement platforms: (i) Transparency: how can users learn what data is known about them and how it is being used? (ii) Fairness: can advertisers target users in a discriminatory manner and if so how can we detect that? (iii) Privacy: does the advertisement platform leak personal information of users? For each of these challenges, we present initial solutions and discuss remaining open questions.”
  • Women in Sustainability: Navigating Your Career” (Tuesday, February 27, 5-6pm, Faculty House) – RSVP at link
    • “This event focuses on how women navigate careers in sustainability, exploring the female perspective on professional development and advancement in this growing field. The panel features an impressive group of women working in diverse sustainability roles, including sustainable finance, corporate sustainability, and green building.”

But wait, there’s more!

Feb

25

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Justin Vernon of Bon Iver, here pictured in the depths of heterosexual angst.

The weather’s been sad and gray for the past few days, and Bwog’s been feelin’ so gosh-darn blue. We were trying to come up with a way to channel this Big Sadboi Mood™, when someone got the idea to pool all of our loose change together and use it to hire Bon Iver to write us a sad song. Below is the result of that $10.32, perfect for listening to whilst staring out of a window and wondering where it all went wrong. Without further ado: “Skinny Bwog.”

Come on, skinny Bwog, just last the year
Pitch to us tonight, meeting time is here
My my my, my my my, my, my
Staring at the table of snacks and WordPress gear
I tell my Bwog to write it all
Quit the job at Spec that you got last fall
My my my, my my my, my, my
Right in this moment, don’t have to stall

And I told you: Lerner 510
And I told you it’s at 9
And I told you we have snacks too
And I’ll tell you just what kind:
And in the evening we’ll eat green grapes
Oh so crisp and fresh and fine
And I’ll be holding all the pitches
And you’ll be writing your bylines…

Come on, skinny Bwog, what happened here?
A campus publication without peer
My my my, my my my, my, my
Sullen load is full, so slow on the ramps

And I told you: Lerner 510
And I told you it’s at 9
And I told you we have snacks too
And I told you just what kind
And now all your humor’s wasted
And then who the hell was I?
And I’m shouting for your pitches
And at the end of the headline…

Who will rush Bwog?
Who will write?
Who will edit what comes from your mind?

(Up next: a Butler-themed remix of “Re: Stacks“)

Sadboi Iver by Moses Namkung via Wikimedia Commons.

Feb

25

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If you don’t want this on all trees, never speak to me again

Happening in the world: Italy’s gearing up for an election on March 4; protests by both anti-fascist and far-rights groups have spread across the country in advance of the vote. Former Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, leading the right-wing Forza Italia party, seems to be in the lead, per polling. (BBC)

Happening in the US: Two weeks ago, President Trump refused to declassify the Democratic rebuttal to the now-infamous “Nunes memo,” which essentially baselessly alleged widespread corruption within the FBI. Yesterday evening, the House Intelligence Committee released that rebuttal, which attempts to take down the Republican memo’s “point-by-point.” (New York Times; soft paywall)

Happening in the city: Today in “no fun allowed,” the Parks Department wants handmade tree sweaters to be removed from West Village trees. The creator of the project, fiber artist Suzanne Tidwell, seems to be okay with their removal, but oi, bureaucrats: let people enjoy things! (NY Post)

Happening on campus: The Athena Film Festival continues its lineup of events today, with the full schedule available here. Highlights include screenings of Moana and The Post (Oscar-nominated!) and a fascinating-sounding panel titled “Revising the Canon.”

Overheard: “Let’s just live in Ferris instead of dealing with housing this year.” (Room Selection Registration opens March 2nd, folks! This Friday!)

Sunday Song Suggestion(s): First, go listen to the two new Janelle Monáe songs (“Make Me Feel” and “Django Jane”). Heard ’em? Good. Now listen to this new Margaret Atwood-quoting, feminist JAM by monotone indie rockstar Courtney Barnett.

Yarn bombing by Smirkybec via Wikimedia Commons.

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