Ad

Monthly Archive: April 2018

Apr

29

Written by

img April 29, 201811:14 amimg 0 Comments

Alternate opening line: “Tell me about a complicated Bwog.”

Move over, Emily Wilson and/or Richard Lattimore: Bwog is finally ready to uncover our own translation of the Odyssey. It’s a revolutionary version of the ancient poem that is sure to get the literary world talking; not only in its exacting attention to detail, but also the subtle ways in which we update the text for these modern times. Everyone on Bwog pitched in to write this most accurate of translations. The opening lines of this monumental effort, forthcoming from Columbia University Press in July 2018, are below.

 

Tell me, Muse, of the Bwog of many grapes, who was driven
far journeys, after he had sacked Lerner 510‘s sacred citadel.
Many were they whose pitches he heard, whose minds he learned of,
many the meetings he attended in his spirit on the MoHi campus,
struggling for his own finals and the procrastinating of his companions.
Even so they could not concentrate on Sunday at 9:00 pm, hard though
they strove to; they were destroyed by their own wild recklessness,
fools, who did not come to Bwog’s last Open Meeting of the semester,
and lost the grapes of their homecoming. From some point
here, goddess, daughter of Bwog, speak, and begin our story.

Opening lines via Wikimedia Commons.

 

Apr

29

Written by

img April 29, 201810:51 amimg 0 Comments

This is a painting by Étienne Terrus… OR IS IT????

Happening in the world: A French museum dedicated to painter Étienne Terrus, a close friend of Henri Matisse, has discovered that over half its collection consists of fakes. Apparently, some paintings featured buildings built after Terrus’ death. Yikes! (BBC)

Happening in the US: Here’s a recap of the exciting news that, earlier this week, Joseph DeAngelo was arrested in Sacramento, CA, as the suspected East Area Rapist/Original Night Stalker (EAR/ONS), also known as the Golden State Killer. Warning for lots of mentions of sexual assault and general violence. (NY)

Happening in the city: A cat that spent a week roaming JFK Airport after escaping from its owner has been captured. We can finally breathe easy knowing Pepper’s back in loving hands. (NBC)

Happening on campus: From 1:30 to 2:30 pm today, go to either John Jay Lounge or McBain Lounge for a dog study break! More information at the Facebook event page.

Sunday song suggestion:

Maybe a painting by Terrus via Wikimedia Commons

Apr

29

Written by

img April 29, 20182:06 amimg 0 Comments

We found this pic of Tom’s outdoor seating from God knows when

This is not a drill. Tom’s Diner takes cards now. We are not kidding. Betsy’s friend is paying with a debit card right now. Idris has been paying with card since a few weeks ago. First Koronet’s, and now Tom’s. Will Hungarian be next?

Tags: , ,

Apr

28

Written by

img April 28, 20186:55 pmimg 6 Comments

I wish I could be as happy as John right now.

Needing inspiration to get through studying for finals? Here’s a fresh perspective on the Columbia experience from John Avendano. 

Name, School, Major, Hometown: John Avendano, Columbia College, Psychology, Colts Neck, New Jersey

Claim to fame: Proud member of the Carman 10 and Carlton Arms 9C families. Deantini once challenged me (amongst others) to a snowball fight via email, and proceeded to best me in a one on one duel. I’ll be back, Deantini. I’m also Senior Class President, lead for COÖP, am on the fencing team, went on a life-changing Global Brigades trip to Honduras in 2016, and couldn’t choose a time for 40’s on 40 so everybody consequently hated me. I’ve probably messaged you about voting for CCSC elections at some point over the past few years. I apologize for how #extra I was and how #extra I am on social media (and in general).

Where are you going? Taking some time to work at a hospital in New Jersey, travel, spend time with my 91 year old grandma, and apply to medical school!

What are 3 things you learned at Columbia and would like to share with the Class of 2022?

1. Say hi to people and smile at them when you’re walking around on campus – even if you vaguely know them. Whether you met someone at Mel’s in the midst of a large, stuffy crowd, or you met someone because you were randomly assigned to be in a group with them for a class project, don’t be afraid to say hey. It’s up to us to make Columbia the warm, friendly community that people hope to see. And given that there are a lot of friendly people at Columbia, don’t hesitate to ask for help if you need it – people are generally willing to lend a hand!

More wise words after the jump

Apr

28

Written by

img April 28, 20185:33 pmimg 0 Comments

Self-care during finals is just as important as regularly taking care of your skin!

It’s that time again: finals. You’re likely feeling extra stress, and that stress might be exhibiting itself very boldly on your face. Fear not! Bwogger and skincare aficionado Lucy Danger has these skincare for finals tips ready to prepare you for your exams and those stress-free days after finals final-ly end.

Skincare isn’t a one-stop shot, even during finals season. Doing one face mask won’t make a difference if you still don’t take off your makeup after long nights at Butler. These tips are quick, easy ways to incorporate good skincare habits into your routine when you really have no time, but they’re always useful.

Masking
It’s around this time that you’ll start hearing RAs, Stressbusters, and other campus de-stressors bring up face masks as relaxation techniques, along with massages, ice cream, and who knows what else! Here are some best face mask habits.

Don’t mask too often. Face masks are certainly a great skincare habit to get into – but it’s key to remember that masking too often can actually have detrimental effects. It’s safe to say that you shouldn’t mask more than 3 times per week, no matter how stressed you are.

Work with what you have. Especially when you’re already busy and stressed out, you don’t need to go out of your way to buy fancy products or spend hours and hours trying to figure out how to use gimmicky masks. Sheet masks are great when you’re in a rush because you can use them anywhere – including Butler at 4 am, if that’s what your life is like! Tub masks are good too, but generally take a little bit longer and require water and a towel. And DIY masks, which only work the way they’re supposed to about half the time and take way longer than you have every time, aren’t the best choice.

More skincare tips after the jump!

Apr

28

Written by

img April 28, 20183:35 pmimg 6 Comments

Save them. Please.

This Friday, Bwog staffers attended the 124th Annual Varsity Show, a student-written and directed musical about life at Columbia. The verdict: a talented cast bogged down by mediocre writing and a lack of specificity.

If Alma Mater came to life one day, stretched her iron legs and dusted off her crown, turned her metal eye on the parade of students down College Walkwhat would she say? Would she be proud of this generation of Columbians? Would she understand our struggles? What would she do if an over-ambitious CCSC campaign promise led to massive embezzlement and a campus-wide power outage?

Luckily, this year’s Varsity Show, Lights Out on Broadway, is here to tell us. The play revolves around two candidates in a neck-and-neck race for CCSC president: Chelsea Shaw (Genevieve Joers, CC ’20), a hyper-competent, aspiring law student; and William Schermerhorn VIII (Talmage Wise, CC ’18), who wants to live up to his ancestors’ legacy by creating some name recognition. With the correct pronunciation.

To Chelsea’s dismay, William wins the election by promising an unlimited budget for all clubs. In order to fulfil his promise, William steals the key to the “Columbia vault” from his trustee uncle and embezzles massive amounts of money. Clubs are overjoyed, but the lack of budget leads to housing cutbacks. The dorms’ power goes out during reading week. Finally, Chelsea and her friends uncover William’s crime and successfully impeach him. Chelsea, for some reason, becomes president.

Read more after the jump

Apr

28

Written by

img April 28, 20181:38 pmimg 1 Comments

Alex, your future is as bright as your smile.

Can’t get enough of Bwog’s Senior Wisdoms? Good news: we’re just getting started. Here with his tips to best enjoy your Columbia experience is our next senior, Alex Swanson. 

Name, School, Major, Hometown: Alex Swanson—or Alexan der Swanson according to Columbia, CC’ 18, Classics, London

Claim to fame: I dispense terrible advice and incompetently-run organizations when the need arises. They also call me Tigerman.

Where are you going? Eternal and ongoing education, temporarily based next year in the U.K., since my job prospects are dimmer than a February sunset over a frosted Hudson. It’s as Abelard obscurely said: there is always salvation in unnecessarily niche academia.

What are 3 things you learned at Columbia and would like to share with the Class of 2022?

1. It’s very easy to drift out of friendships so make an effort to stay in touch! I have not been as active as I wish I had been in maintaining friendships with those I’ve enjoyed spending time and conversing with over the years. I very much regret not staying close to friends who I’ve met in the odd class or two. Nothing’s more depressing for the human soul than the awkward drive-by “hey” done at just the right moment with someone you used to be close to and really got on with. I endure too many of those moments.

2. Don’t develop an addiction taste for coffee. Oh, the time and money wasted on the Devil’s Elixir over my four years—it pains me. Don’t let the media fool you: alcohol ain’t the real danger, kids; it’s caffeine!

3. There’s no point studying for 20 hours a day if you aren’t being productive. If it’s 4AM in Butler and your pace of work has grinded to a slow and dejected trudge, you’re better off calling it a night and starting “fresh” in the morning. If you aren’t working efficiently, go outside, take a break. Take the night off if you have to. Perhaps it’s a fool’s tactic, but I’ve found that it’s really helped me not get dragged down in the middle of rough patches.

Is Alex as wise as Teiresias?

Apr

28

Written by

img April 28, 201812:00 pmimg 1 Comments

Eating in Hewitt? She’s Barnard Bold.

Bwog is kicking off our Senior Wisdoms with Barnard’s very own Ali Fraerman! She may not have known that she would be graduating, but she does have some pretty good advice to give. 

Name, School, Major, Hometown: Ali Fraerman, Barnard, Human Rights and Political Science, Chicago suburbs

Claim to fame: Graduating a year early by surprise, taking grad pictures in Hewitt, being the Roosevelt Institute’s resident advocate for “human rights do exist.”

Where are you going? Working for a civil rights firm downtown (will be migrating back to Morningside frequently) before my inevitable return to school.

What are 3 things you learned at Columbia and would like to share with the Class of 2022?

1. Go to office hours. They can only help, and sometimes professors will read your papers and tell you exactly what they want.

2. Pare down your schedule. Cut out activities that do not make you happy, leave time for naps but also do leave ample time to pace yourself on big assignments.

3. Always be fulfilling your Columbia/Barnard bucket list! In other words, if there’s something you’ve always wanted to do on campus, in New York, or with your friends, or someone you’ve always want to get to know better, do it now! You could find yourself with a year until graduation one day and two months the next.

But would she rather give up oral sex or cheese?

Apr

28

Written by

img April 28, 201810:07 amimg 0 Comments

We hope today’s Bwoglines will make you as happy as this slightly terrifying cookie!

Happening in the World: After a historic summit between North Korean leader Kim Jong-un and South Korean leader Moon Jae-in, Kim Jong-un has agreed to work toward denuclearization and an eventual peace treaty to end the Korean War. The two briefly stepped into North Korea, while holding hands, after returning to the South, followed by a tree-planting ceremony at the DMZ. (BBC)

Happening in the US: On the second day of the Arizona teachers’ walkout, Governor Doug Ducey has announced a plan to raise teachers’ salaries by 20 percent by 2020, also hoping to restore funding for schools that were previously cut. The legislature plans to release and approve a budget early next week. (Reuters)

Happening in NYC: Meek Mill has arrived in NYC for the first time since getting released from jail, where he reportedly had sushi with Philadelphia 76ers co-owner Michael Rubin. (NY Daily News)

Happening on Campus: The Caribbean Students Association is closing out Caribbean Heritage Week with Final Fete tonight in Roone Arledge Auditorium from 10 pm to 2 am. Tickets are $2 and available at TIC for CUID holders, while non-CUID holders must register on the guest list to guarantee a ticket. Check out the Facebook event here.

Bop of the Day:

Image via Wikipedia

Apr

27

Written by

img April 27, 20188:00 pmimg 1 Comments

Marcellus is awesome.

Shakespeare nerd and Senior Staffer Abby Rubel couldn’t resist checking out KCST’s spring production of  Hamlet

Editor’s note, 4/28 2:15 pm: One line in the review about Hamlet and Horatio’s relationship and the caption of the photo depicting these two characters have been changed; this line and caption utilized a homophobic trope.

Anyone who knows any line of Shakespeare knows at least part of Hamlet’s famous soliloquy: “To be, or not to be, that is the question,” goes the speech. As powerful as it is written on the page, it’s somehow even more compelling delivered on the steps of Earl Hall, with Hamlet, played by Bailey Coleman (BC ’19), lit dramatically from below.

Every year, the King’s Crown Shakespeare Troupe puts on a production of Shakespeare using Columbia’s campus as the set. Ensemble members lead the audience from location to location. This year’s show, Hamlet, is much more well-known that last year’s As You Like It, and there’s baggage that comes with that. After all, how could you possibly deliver the same lines as Kenneth Branagh?

Hamlet is the story of a prince of Denmark whose uncle, Claudius, kills his father and marries his mother. Hamlet’s father’s ghost appears to him and asks that Hamlet revenge him. Hamlet agrees. What follows is, of course, a tragedy. Hamlet pretends to be mad and kills Polonius (the king’s advisor), which drives Ophelia (his lady-love) insane. In revenge, Ophelia’s brother, Laertes, conspires with Claudius to kill Hamlet in a fencing match. As backup, Claudius poisons a glass of wine. Unsurprisingly, the whole scheme goes wrong and everyone dies except Horatio, Hamlet’s best friend. But you already knew that.

Read more about ghosts, gays, and color theory after the jump.

Apr

27

Written by

img April 27, 20186:36 pmimg 7 Comments

Classical Whines is back for whines about the classics and a wine rec. This time, it’s about Ovid’s Metamorphoses; a work that was once on the LitHum syllabus but has since been eviscerated from the Core. As a disclaimer, we are aware that LitHum syllabi may differ slightly between sections, but for our intents and purposes, this article will discuss the standard syllabus from the Core website. Also, Bwog does not endorse underage drinking; the wine recommendation is only for readers who are of legal drinking age.

Dr. Lake, who was my Latin teacher in high school, once said that Ovid’s Metamorphoses is the second most influential piece of literature for western art, after the Bible. I haven’t taken Art Hum yet, so I can’t vouch for this myself, but Dr. Lake said it, so it must be true. But you don’t even need to take Art Hum to see the range of influence that Ovid had on western art. If you’ve ever seen any of the paintings in the gallery below, you have Ovid to thank for the inspiration. (Botticelli’s Birth of Venus isn’t a story that is actually in the Metamorphoses, but this article from the Uffizi Gallery in Florence cites the work as an inspiration for the theme.)

Why is the Metamorphoses so important?

Apr

27

Written by

img April 27, 20185:24 pmimg 5 Comments

In addendum to the ongoing strike and with no clear end in sight, a petition has been drafted to extend the strike. Student workers predict, should the strike be extended, it will continue until the end of the term. 

Graduate and undergraduate students march in solidarity on Low Plaza

A petition has been circulating among graduate student workers which calls for a vote on extending the graduate students’ strike until the end of the semester.

The petition argues that the strike has gained enough momentum to continue, and that ending it on Monday “risks turning our strike into a symbolic protest.” It calls for graduate workers to instead “send the union-busting machine that is Columbia a clear message: time is up.” It cites the struggle of NYU graduate workers and the West Virginia teachers’ strike as examples that prove that an extended strike is the only way to force Columbia to the bargaining table.

The petition clearly lays out what an extended strike would mean for the university: “As TAs, that means while we will agree hand over all relevant teaching materials, we will refuse to proctor exams and refuse to grade any course materials. As RAs, we will continue to withhold twenty hours of work as we are doing right now, affirming that the quality of our research depends on our living conditions and the level of respect given to us by the administration.”

Although the petition argues vehemently in favor of extending the strike, its stated purpose is calling a vote on the matter. “In the interest of democracy and collective power, we as rank and file members call on the union to facilitate a vote on extending our strike until the end of term.”

According to a tip, a vote will be called if the petition gets 916 votes. Right now, it has 183 signatures from graduate workers, seven from professors, and 365 from “allies.”

The text of the petition is below.

Apr

27

Written by

img April 27, 20184:00 pmimg 0 Comments

Ready for anything

Classes are almost over, the strike is (maybe) almost over, and most Columbia teams are finishing up their regular season! 

Men’s Tennis: If Columbia (16-4, 5-1 Ivy) wins at Cornell (10-10, 3-3 Ivy) on Saturday at 1 pm, they’ll split the Ivy title with Dartmouth (20-5, 6-1 Ivy). Dartmouth, however, has already clinched the Ivy’s automatic berth to the NCAA championships thanks to a victory over Columbia on April 15, which snapped the Light Blue’s 22-match conference win streak. Columbia has won the Ivy title for the past four years, although it was shared with Cornell and Harvard last year. Dartmouth hasn’t won a title since 1997 and has only ever won three titles. Columbia and Cornell both dominated last weekend, winning both matches.

Softball: The Lions (19-18, 11-7 Ivy) will face off against Cornell (12-21, 7-8 Ivy) this weekend to determine if they’ll head to the Ivy League Championship Series. Right now, the Lions are in third place behind Harvard and Dartmouth. Only the top two teams go to the series. Harvard also ends its regular season this weekend, while Dartmouth will also play a series against Brown next weekend. The Light Blue will need to have a better record than at least one of those teams to go to the series; they lose a head-to-head record tiebreaker. Regardless of what happens this weekend, the Lions are guaranteed their first winning record in program history.

Lightweight Rowing: The crew team will row its last race of the regular season on Saturday with a home race against Drexel. Following last weekend’s victory over Dartmouth, the varsity eight has won all official cup races this season for the second time ever, and the first time since 2003. Drexel’s varsity eight lost to both Temple and Saint Joseph’s last weekend in the Bergen Cup race. They also lost to Columbia last season in the first two varsity races, but were triumphant in the third.

Another sports photo via gocolumbialions.com

Apr

27

Written by

img April 27, 20183:27 pmimg 0 Comments

IT’S HERE.

Friends, countrymen, Columbia students, lend me your ears. I come to raise awareness of the Varsity Show, not to praise it.

You’ve probably heard of the Varsity Show already. After all, the characteristic yellow T-shirts, water bottles, and sweatshirts have been all over campus in the past few weeks, to say nothing of the endless promotion on Facebook and enormous banner hanging in Lerner. You’ve probably already made plans to go, gotten a ticket, and even figured out how you’ll sneak some libations into Roone. But just in case you’ve been laid low by a mysterious illness or holed up in Butler, here’s the spiel:

It’s here! It is time once again for Columbia’s oldest performing arts tradition: The Varsity Show. The 124th Annual Varsity Show is an original student musical that lampoons this year at Columbia. Come to Roone Arledge Auditorium on April 27th, April 28th, and April 29th to join in a beloved Columbia tradition and laugh at this year and all that came with it.

Check out the Facebook event for more info and ticket links to each show. And if you’re in the balcony tonight, keep your ears out for the Bwog contingent’s inevitable laughter whenever Spec gets mentioned.

That sounds kinda ominous? via the V124 Facebook event

Apr

27

Written by

img April 27, 20182:33 pmimg 0 Comments

The Barnard Academic Award recipients were announced on Tuesday, April 24th. Over 175 students were awarded this year from a number of disciplines. The recipients are as follows:

  • Abigail Feinberg: Faculty Recognition Prize for Distinguished Achievement in Psychology
  • Abigail Kempf: B.G. Segal Intern Fund
  • Aining Ma: CJC Grant
  • Alana Taub: Foundations of Neuroscience Prize for Outstanding Research Achievement
  • Alexa Pinsky: Foundations of Neuroscience Prize for Outstanding Research Achievement
  • Ali Oshinsky: Howard M. Teichmann Writing Prize, Peter S. Prescott prize for Prose Writing
  • Aliza Isaacs: Sylvia Kopald Selekman Prize
  • Allison Emmet: Lucyle Hook Travel Grant
  • Alya Al Sager: Intellectual Frontiers Prize for Distinguished Accomplishment in Psychology
  • Alyssa Furber: German Scholarship Fund prize
  • Amara Jaeger: Margaret Kenney Jensen Prize
  • Amarelis Raudales: Faculty Recognition Prize for Distinguished Achievement in Psychology
  • Ambar Kleinbort: Foundations of Neuroscience Prize for Outstanding Research Achievement
  • Andrea Jo: Helen Prince Memorial prize
  • Andromeda Urquilla: Barnard Chemistry Dept. Award for Excellence in Research
  • Angela Montero: American Chemical Society’s Division of Analytical Chemistry Award
  • Anisa Tavangar: CJC Grant
  • Anni Wen: Fulbright Scholarship
  • Aubri Juhasz: Ann Barrow Hamilton Memorial Prize
  • Audrey Crane: Lucy Moses Award
  • Ayana Renoldi Bracco: Bettina Buonocore Salvo Prize

Discover who the other recipients are after the jump.

© 2006-2015 Blue and White Publishing Inc.