Apr

22

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If you need to get signed into someone else’s dorm tonight, there’s a pretty good chance you’ll forget to pick up your ID on the way out, then panic a few minutes (or hours, or days) later. So, how do you go about asking for it back from the desk guard? Managing Editor Betsy Ladyzhets has put together a handy flowchart to help you figure that out, based on way too much personal experience.

Every possible ID-forgetting scenario?

Apr

22

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Honestly, we put up with a lot of shit (weather-wise) as New Yorkers. Yet, between the time we’re bombarded by hail in 15ºF weather and baked by the summer humidity, there is a 2-month sliver of time (April-May) where we’re reminded by how pleasant nature can actually be.

In celebration of Earth Day, we asked Bwoggers to take pictures of campus and of New York City in all its springtime glory. Next time you walk to class, take a moment to appreciate how lucky you are to have such a gorgeous campus.

 

luscious lawns since 1754

 

 

Greek columns and chill

More aesthetic photos after the jump

Apr

22

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Art expresses the full range of human experience, in all its beauty and aspirations. No matter your interests or background, you are guaranteed to find in the city of New York art that speaks to you. Earlier today, Bwog posted arts events happening on campus. In this post, Bwog describes art exhibitions happening in Manhattan, most of them free to Barnumbia students.

For the fashionista: The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Rei Kawakubo / Comme des Garçons: Art of the In-Between

May 4 – September 4: FREE

The Met seems to have it all: Monets, Japanese calligraphy, even an Egyptian temple. However, most visitors don’t know that the Met has a constantly changing fashion exhibit, featuring the most important developments in fashion. In May, check out the Comme des Garçons exhibit, which “will examine the work of Japanese fashion designer Rei Kawakubo, known for her avant-garde designs and ability to challenge conventional notions of beauty, good taste, and fashionability.”

No need to fly halfway across the world to see these bad boys

For the history buff: The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Age of Empires: Chinese Art of the Qin and Han Dynasties

Through July 16: FREE

The Qin and Han dynasties witnessed the formation of the Chinese identity, consolidating the language, artistic traditions, and many of the values still present in Chinese society today. Here’s your chance to see some of the famed Xi’an terracotta warriors, as well as some works of art that have never before been displayed in the United States. Bwoggers who have been to this exhibit give the experience a 10/10.

For the activist: Whitney Museum of American Art: The 2017 Whitney Biennial

Through June 11: $17

Every two years, the Whitney Museum puts on an exhibition that highlights the current state of American art. This year’s biennial is especially poignant, as it “arrives at a time rife with racial tensions, economic inequities, and polarizing politics. Throughout the exhibition, artists challenge us to consider how these realities affect our senses of self and community.”

Click for Helen Frankenthaler and Joan Miró

Apr

22

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Bwog will be there. Will you?

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

Monday, April 24th

Wednesday, April 26th

  • Midday Music featuring Alec Hon and Dean Deng, cello and piano duo, 12:00 PM, Garden Room 2 at Faculty House – Alec Hon and Dean Deng will be performing a program D. Shostakovich: Sonata for Cello and Piano in d minor, Op. 40S and Prokofiev: Sonata for Cello and Piano on C Major, Op. 119 – Free and open to the public
  • Marco Fusi: violin, viola, viola d’amore, 7:00 PM, The Italian Academy – “Marco Fusi is an Italian violinist and violist and a passionate advocate for the music of our time. Among many collaborations with established and emerging composers, he has recently premiered works by Billone, Scelsi, Sciarrino, Eötvös, Cendo, and Ferneyhough.” – Free and open to the public
  • Klezmer Ensemble: Spring Concert 2017, 8:00 PM, 112 Dodge Hall – Free and open to the public

(more…)

Apr

22

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make everyone jealous by walking into class with this fabulous drink

Happening in the United States: The University of California, Berkeley reversed its decision to ban conservative author Ann Coulter from speaking on campus, rescheduling her talk on campus in early May. (The New York Times)

Happening in New York City: Check out the Met’s latest exhibition: The Age of Empires. Explore artwork from ancient China (Qin and Han dynasties), including various terracotta warriors and other treasures never before exhibited in the United States. (The Metropolitan Museum of Art)

Happening Near Campus: Celebrate Earth Day by participating in the March for Science between 10:30am and 4pm at 64th and Central Park West.

Overheard: “If I started a fraternity, it’d be Eta Omicron Epsilon. HOE for short.”

Treat Yourself: Wondering about all the hype surrounding the Unicorn Frappuccino at Starbucks? Check out this Buzzfeed video to learn more about this beverage.

Unicorn frappuccino via news.starbucks.com

Apr

21

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No guarantees MoHi spicy tuna rolls actually look like this

Like off-brand toilet paper and the John Jay rice bowls, spicy tuna rolls are really hit or miss. If you get one from the right place, they can serve as a perfect deli lunch, but if you hit up the wrong joint, they can also serve as a perfect disappointment. Bwog Bagel Amara presents you with a guide to MoHi deli tuna rolls. 

I’ve been you before. Your class releases at 2:25 but your recitation starts at 3, which is just not enough time for a sit-down lunch. You want to grab a quick sushi roll but you don’t want it to be nasty… where should you go?

1. Milano (<$8): Milano has very fresh ingredients and makes their rolls fresh throughout the afternoon. This means the rice will be pretty soft (not like refrigerator crunchy), and the spicy mayo they put on top has little red flakes in it. They don’t make the sushi extra spicy or anything, but they look hardcore.

2. Appletree (<$7): I honestly want to give Appletree the award for best deli in Morningside. Even though it’s a few blocks deep, their ingredients are really fresh and tasty. At first, I thought only their sandwiches were good, but then I learned their spicy tuna rolls are super good too! The rice is a little harder because they leave it in the fridge for longer, but it’s still super good. Definitely worth the hike; also pick up a cantaloupe cup (they sell one of the best in MoHi as well).

3. Morton Williams (<$8) (but only before 6pm): I know what you’re thinking– can Morton Williams do anything right, other than being overpriced and open 24 hours? Yes. When the sushi chef is there, the rolls are actually pretty quality. The tuna is a little spicier than the others, so if you’re looking for a kick, head to 116th!

spicy tuna rollage via stu_spivack on Flickr

Apr

21

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Uh, I love voting

Finally, after endless Facebook posts and candidates sliding into your DMs, the Spring 2017 CCSC Election has ended, and here are the results:

Senate: Omar Khan

Executive Board:

President: Nathan Rosin (Alliance)
VP of Policy: Nicole Allicock (Alliance)
VP of Finance: Adam Resheff (Low Beach Party)
VP of Communications: Sreya Pinnamaneni (Alliance)
VP of Campus Life: Alex Cedar (Alliance)

Your new At-Large Reps and Class Councils under the cut

Apr

21

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The four senior Directing theses

Four Theater majors are presenting their senior theses for the first of two installments of Barnard’s Senior Thesis Festival 2017. One of these theses is centered on Eugene Ionesco’s The Bald Soprano. There will be another showing of The Bald Soprano tonight at 8 pm in the Minor Latham Playhouse in Milbank Hall, Room 118. Admission is free. Bwog Staffer Gloriana Lopez reviews the performance. 

The Bald Soprano is a play by French-Romanian author Eugene Ionesco, in which Director Brittany Searles (BC’ 17) and Set Designer Ruth Hollander (GS/JTS ’17) presented their thesis. Part of the Theater of the Absurd, this play is full of witty commentary on the banality and senselessness of life (quite fitting for Columbia I must admit). Instead of the usual setting in London, England, the production team decided to set the play in the suburbs of Washington D.C. also updating certain aspects of the plot to the 21st century.

The play begins with Mr. Smith (James Ritchie CC’20) and Mrs. Smith (Bailey Coleman BC’19) sitting in their living room, which is covered in clocks. Mrs. Smith talks incessantly about the events that transpired during the evening (although Mr. Smith was also there), while Mr. Smith reads the newspaper. Then, their maid Mary (Madeleine Williams BC ’20) announces that their friends the Martins are waiting on the door. As Mr. and Mrs. Smith change their clothes to welcome the couple, Mr. Martin (Jackson Welles SEAS ’19) and Mrs. Martin (Angelique Nicole Dudley GS ’19) talk to each other as if they just had met and start revealing information that allows them to conclude that they are in fact married.  However, Mary comes in to let the audience know that Mrs. Martin’s and Mr. Martin’s daughters have a red eye and a white eye in different positions.

What happened next, and what did Bwog think about all this?

Apr

21

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Peter and Jerry, deep into their stressing and illuminating conversation.

In another foray into theatre, Internal Editor Finn Klauber attended the performance of three one-act plays written by playwright Edward Albee. Through the absurdity and confusion, he managed to pick up on some essential thematic substance at the core of performance. 

At no point in the CU Players production of “Both Houses, a Plague” did I ever lose a deep seated sense of bewilderment. The play, an adaptation of three one-act performances penned by American playwright Edward Albee, consistently seemed to mock the dramatic structures integral to theatrical performance, juxtaposing the absurdity of plotlessness with dialectics on meaning and purpose. Though the three acts were connected theatrically by Director William Sydney (CC ’19), whether through the manipulation of theatrical space or unstated thematic links, the pure absurdity of the performance in some parts muddled the deeper meaning—if such meaning even exists.

It’s simple to recount and summarize the plot elements present in the three acts, despite this. In the first act, “The Sandbox,” Mommy, played by Ariana Busby (BC ’18), and Daddy, played by Rowan Hepps Keeney (CC ’20), set down the doddering and seemingly senile Grandma, Mommy’s mother played by Lily Whiteman (CC ’19), in an onstage sandbox. A shirtless Young Man, Spencer Tilghman (CC ’20), performs vaguely wing-like calisthenics while standing rooted in place above her, and a Musician, Olivia Loomis (BC ’19), plays a cello softly. The brunt of the act seems to concern Mommy and Daddy grappling with some unstated but critical decision, while Grandma addresses the audience and flirts with the Young Man. After a night has passed, Mommy and Daddy are spiritually rejuvenated, and they leave the decrepit Grandma in the sandbox. In opposition to the Young Man’s prior confusion over his name and purpose in this performance—a meta conflation of the dramatic performance with the reality of the play—he now leans down, realizing he is the Angel of Death, and takes Grandma away.

Peter and Jerry are up next

Apr

21

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Chef Timmy Wu

It may have been 4/20 yesterday, but we don’t smoke. Bwog is already high all the time… on life! Bakers/staffers Sarah Dahl and Timmy Wu wanted brownies, and they made them. The safe way.

We decided to use an old/ancient family recipe from Sarah. After some initial texting confusion (Timmy: We need to bake. Sarah: Yes, before Surf and Turf. Do you have? Timmy: No… I meant actually bake. Baking with Bwog…) we got on our way.

Here’s the recipe, with additions courtesy Timmy and Sarah.

Deep Dish Brownie

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup butter or margarine, melted
  • 1 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • 3 eggs
  • 3/4 cup unsifted all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup cocoa powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Instructions

Blend melted butter and sugar, vanilla, in medium bowl. Add eggs, beat well with spoon. Combine flour and cocoa, baking powder, and salt; gradually add to egg mixture until well-blended. Spread in a greased 8-inch square pan. Bake at 350 F for 40-45 minutes (be careful if your dorm kitchen is salty af! It might be done sooner) or until brownie begins to pull away from pan. Cool, cut into squares.

Timmy via Bwogger Sarah Dahl

Apr

21

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Vaporwave

Happening in the world: This quarter, Barbie sales fell 13%, while Mattel sales overall fell 15.4%. Uh, they still have what I don’t — millions of dollars. (BBC News)

Happening in Nico (long for NYC): A lawyer from Queens was arrested yesterday for stealing around $600,000 from the estate of a client, who was a judge. This is a ton of judicial things criss-crossing at a time. (New York Times)

Happening on campus: Community Lunch will be hosting a dinner and discussion panel on hunger tomorrow at 6:30 pm in the Broadway Presbyterian Church (601 West 114th).

Overheard: “Bee-wog”

Health goth tip: Uh, eat veggies?

Barbie gurl via Pixabay

Apr

20

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Irin Carmon Reporting Live As An Athena Distinguished Fellow?

At the last Athena Power Talk of the semester, the Barnard’s Athena Center welcome Irin Carmon to discuss her career thus far. As one of the co-authors of The Notorious RBG and a ex-correspondent at MSNBC, specializing in gender in politics. Bwog Deputy Editor Mia Lindheimer covers the event.

When Ruth Bader Ginsburg is wearing her “dissent jabot,” Irin Carmon is taking notes. Carmon has been reporting on gender-based issues for most of her career, from riding in a van with pro-lifers to write a story about the historic vote against banning abortions after 20 weeks. Carmon was approached to partner with Shana Knizhnik to author The Notorious RBG: The Life & Times of Ruth Bader Ginsberg, a detailed account of just how RBG became so notorious.

Just how did it happen?

Apr

20

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Mitchell S. Jackson contemplates.

The last lecture of a series focusing on voice, Mitchell S. Jackson, someone who “nerds out” over prose and can’t have tea without honey, talked about finding an eloquent voice in creative writing. Bwogger Gloriana Lopez attended the event. 

As I entered Dodge 501, someone gave me a 19-page packet. After considering taking some wine, I wondered if I could actually get away with covering this event by just reading these pages. I would be proven wrong in the following hour.

Mitchell S. Jackson began his lecture by reading a paragraph from a handout that was provided to the audience. He talked about how the eloquence of a writer comes from their philosophies. Using the words of different authors’ opinion on voice, he gave the following advice on finding one’s voice:

What is his advice?

Apr

20

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A look from Broadway into the McIntosh Dining Room on the second floor of the Diana Center. It's a very orange building in its walls and carpets.

This room looks much orange-er in the daytime

It’s election season in all the undergraduate schools, and Barnard is no exception. The Student Government Association held a candidates forum last night, and Bwogger Ross Chapman went to review the forum. 

Barnard’s SGA is much nicer than Columbia’s CCSC. At the very least, the speakers at SGA’s Candidates’ Forum were much more polite than those at the CCSC debate. Tuesday night’s event in the McIntosh Dining Room in the Diana center were characterized more by snapping than shouting. In the last SGA event before polls opened at 11 pm, Fall 2017’s candidates gave two-minute speeches on their platforms and took questions from the audience.

Fourteen of the twenty-two positions up for election were uncontested, including three of the five positions on SGA’s executive board. Also uncontested were all of the President and Vice President positions for the class councils. Further downplaying the competitive nature of the night were about a half-dozen stand-in speeches, where abroad (or busy) candidates had their speeches read by confidantes.

Even those who ran unopposed still gave passionate speeches and took questions. Nominee for Campus Affairs Rep Mia Lindheimer, also a Deputy Editor for Bwog, advocated for “a technology overhaul” to fix the Barnard sign-in system and policies. Tamar Dayanim, Nominee for Junior Rep to the Board of Trustees, wanted transparency (a theme of the night) from the student reps who spoke to the trustees. Evie McCorkle, running for VP of finance, rattled off her impressive SGA track record and spoke of her partnership with Nominee for Sophomore President Rose Reiken to subsidize laundry costs. And one of the last speakers of the night, Nominee for VP of Campus Life Aku Acquaye, encouraged all nominees present of their success in student leadership, and expressed excitement for all of the women of color running for positions.

At the Representative level, battles were fought over the reps for Sustainable Initiatives, Inclusion and Equity, Food and Dining, Seven Sisters Relations, and Health Services. Both Food and Dining nominees called for better labeling of ingredients and more options for vegan and Halal diets. Kristen Akey demanded answers from Aramark on how local and sustainable Barnard’s ingredients are, while Sarah Bronicser advocated for better swipe sharing and meal donation while making a token appeal to food insecurity.

More SGA after the jump.

Apr

20

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The official event photo.

It’s time for one of Columbia’s most cherished dining traditions. That’s right: it’s Surf & Turf time. Enjoy the effing beatiful green lawns, the flourishing Spring weather with an outdoor dinner! Get excited for shrimp, steak, and lobster on the lawn, followed by an ice cream bar that’s sure to be delectable.

 

Though the event starts at 5:00, if you want to avoid really long lines, you’ll probably want to start lining up even sooner than that. It’s sure to be a highlight of your day, so enjoy!

Image via CU Dining 

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