Search Results for: Hawkmadinejad

Sep

24

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img September 24, 201112:01 pmimg 2 Comments

Last night, Hawkma was spotted on the John Jay 10 terrace. Quick-witted freshpeople snapped a few gorgeous pictures of the bird contemplating his/her existence. If Hawkma really is a she, her theme song would probably be Queen of the Night.

Nighthawk(s) by David Brann.

Sep

6

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img September 06, 20117:30 pmimg 19 Comments

Self-appointed Chief Hawkmadinejad Biographer Sameea Butt sings of gender identity and incorporeality for the benefit of 2015.

Hawkma puffed up with Columbia pride

It all started with SIPA’s decision to make the annual World Leader’s Forum a smidge more interesting in 2007. They extended an invitation, with PrezBo’s blessing, to the President of Iran, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, to speak on campus was met with a wide spectrum of reactions: some shouted for dialogue and perspective, while others tried to build an impenetrable human barrier between AJ and Lerner. There must have been free food on South Lawn that day, because he made it safe and sound to Roone to an event that was more or less tame given the insanity his presence precipitated.

A few months later, a hawk was spotted swooping down on its lunch of poor, unsuspecting city pigeon. A call for names was sent out, noting that hawks are territorial, “so he/she might be around for a while.” We had no idea. A short discussion in the comments section later, the notorious bird of prey and predator of the press became one: the red tailed petty dictator of city pigeons was christened Hawkmadinejad.

Contrary to her reputation, Hawkma wasn’t always the fear-mongering bird of prey we know today. It was a long and difficult ride up to the top of the Pantheon of Columbia animals, which to date includes, according to tipsters and commenters, Nathaniel the peregrine falcon, Goose Robbins, a bull named Moo Bullinger, a peacock, and a Morningside Park turkey.

When we first met Hawkma in 2007, she was just a juvenile red tailed hawk having a bit of a tough time settling into the neighbirdhood. She is reported to have frequently gotten into skirmishes with the local birds who, wary of her plans for campus takeover, would try to drive her out. She stood her ground though, boldly defending her new territory against aggressive squirrels and bullying crows.

The feisty little bird’s constant reminders (in the form of bloody massacres) that she wasn’t going anywhere prompted a little research on her family tree, revealing that Hawkma was the abandoned son (sex change or different bird, we discuss ahead) of Pale Male, “the first raptor bird of NYC, who nested on the most expensive piece of property on 5th Avenue a few years back and somehow “lured” a female to his nest with magical pheromones and now has many offspring nesting all over NYC.”

But what gender is Hawkma actually?

Sep

24

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img September 24, 20103:30 pmimg 15 Comments

Hawkma has returned! Big ups to Steve Welsh for the sweet close-ups. Doesn’t Hawkma look regal?

Photos by Steve Welsh

Nov

9

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img November 09, 200912:53 pmimg 21 Comments

Hawkmadinejad made a glorious return yesterday, shredding a pigeon in the trees near John Jay while dropping feathers and guts onto the passers-by below.

 

More gore after the jump!

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Nov

8

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img November 08, 20091:39 pmimg 7 Comments

Ornithology Apprentice Eliza Shapiro insists that Hawkmadinejad has returned to campus. 

 

We, for one, welcome the return of the talon-wielding overlord.

Jun

18

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img June 18, 20097:08 pmimg 10 Comments

Ornithologist-about-town Jon Hill sends along the remains of the meal.

But we’re left asking: where’s the beef?

 

May

21

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img May 21, 20091:58 pmimg 13 Comments

A student project at Temple reveals that our fearsome bird is now terrorizing Philadelphia.

Dec

3

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img December 03, 200811:19 amimg 9 Comments

(Hi Gothamist!)

After spending much of the day on upper campus, Hawkmadinejad finally caught her lunch on the South Lawn. The catch was not quite so dramatic as the last time we saw her dine at Columbia, but the pictures are still pretty excellent. The creature was too small to be a squirrel, and hawkmadinebwog struggled to get a clear picture of her prey. Hawkmadinejad dropped some of the critter’s organs into the hedge below her. Help us identify the annihilated critter from its organs, or prophecy for us if you are a haruspex.

Plenty more pictures after the jump, and on Douds’ facebook page.

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Nov

17

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img November 17, 20082:42 pmimg 22 Comments

Avian tipster extraordinaire Courtney Douds has sent along the following absolutely insane photos of your Hawkmadeinjad ruthlessly tearing into her* prey outside Math today. 

* Douds also points out that “this red-tail is of a size that makes her more likely to be female, since female raptors tend to be about a third larger than their male counterparts.”

Hawkmadinejad is a crazy person. More evidence after the jump and on Douds’ Facebook page.

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Nov

14

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img November 14, 200810:15 amimg 8 Comments

Hawkmadinejad has decided to become more camera-friendly – photographer Samantha Greenberg brings us some photos from outside Earl Hall. More after the jump.

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Oct

29

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img October 29, 200810:02 amimg 25 Comments

Bwog tipster Tipper Austin, CC ’11, alerted us of the presence of a Bird Relocation Expert on campus.  Worried that Our Hero may be in danger, we scurried out to College Walk and saw this van.

bid 

Oct

21

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img October 21, 200811:33 amimg 7 Comments

Last week, campus welcomed the heroic return of its illustrious talon-wielding raptor mascot and friend, Hawkmadinejad. Bwog got so excited at the prospect of an extended stay by our friend at Columbia this fall that we jumped in on all of the hooplah by creating a Hawkmadinejad 1977 Prom Photoshop Contest in his honor.

This is just a friendly reminder to send along any renderings of the winged wonder and perhaps a special friend at their 1977 prom to us here at Bwog.  So, if Butler’s got you a little woozy or you can’t bear studying for that final midterm any more, take a quick break, procrastinate a bit, and send us your favorite likeness of Hawkmadinejad and friend!

All submissions are due by this Wednesday at 11:59 PM to bwog@columbia.edu, and Bwog continues to rack its collective brain to decide on an exciting and creative prize for the winner of this affair, one of our favorite Photoshop contests.  

Oct

19

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img October 19, 20081:30 pmimg 12 Comments

A few days ago, when campus welcomed the returned of local hero Hawkmadinejad, Bwog couldn’t help but notice how handsome your Hawk looked!

Bwog Culinary and Sciences Bureau Chief Jon Hill agreed, but asked, somewhat rhetorically, “More handsome than even in his 1977 prom photo?” Hill had gone back into the Hawkmadinejad family archives and sent along a photo of said prom photo (right).

Which brings us to our newest contest: Photoshop Hawkmadinejad’s 1977 Prom Photo Contest. Send along a rendering of Hawkmadinejad (and hot date!) at their 1977 prom to bwog@columbia.edu. All submissions due by this Wednesday at 11:59 PM. Winner will receive an exciting as-yet-to-be-determined prize!

Oct

16

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img October 16, 20081:54 pmimg 29 Comments

Hawkmadinejad, Winged Hero of Morningside, appears to have returned to campus. O, glorious return! Your bird has been spotted outside of Hamilton (correction: where he promptly devoured a pigeon), Butler (where he promptly devoured a pigeon) and Riverside and 109th. More photos of his fearfulness and sublimity below! Saakashtweety, prepare thyself.


 Photo by Lauren Weiss

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Sep

3

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img September 03, 20087:40 amimg 12 Comments

It’s time to get the story straight. Our Hero Hawkmadinejad, christened and courted with gads of sightings over the course of last school year, proved pervasive and rather uncanny. Commenters squinted at his tail feathers as they seemed to shift from brown to red and then to brown again – rather strange for a red-tailed hawk that only molts in its red retrices once. Something was up with our fair feathered friend.

So here we have it: the truth. From birder and blogger Bruce Yolton,

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