Author Archive

Apr

22

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Bwog will be there. Will you?

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

Monday, April 24th

Wednesday, April 26th

  • Midday Music featuring Alec Hon and Dean Deng, cello and piano duo, 12:00 PM, Garden Room 2 at Faculty House – Alec Hon and Dean Deng will be performing a program D. Shostakovich: Sonata for Cello and Piano in d minor, Op. 40S and Prokofiev: Sonata for Cello and Piano on C Major, Op. 119 – Free and open to the public
  • Marco Fusi: violin, viola, viola d’amore, 7:00 PM, The Italian Academy – “Marco Fusi is an Italian violinist and violist and a passionate advocate for the music of our time. Among many collaborations with established and emerging composers, he has recently premiered works by Billone, Scelsi, Sciarrino, Eötvös, Cendo, and Ferneyhough.” – Free and open to the public
  • Klezmer Ensemble: Spring Concert 2017, 8:00 PM, 112 Dodge Hall – Free and open to the public

(more…)

Apr

15

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The warm weather makes us want to dance, but the pollen makes us want to stay inside (and check out the arts)!

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

Saturday, April 15th

  • CoLab Spring 2017 Showcase, 7:30 PM, Glicker-Milstein Theatre – “CoLab Performing Arts Collective is a student dance group focused on creating, developing, and workshopping multi-disciplinary projects. The group provides an outlet on campus to showcase process-based works that challenge current genre distinctions and promote creative collaboration amongst university peers. CoLab’s Spring Showcase will present nine new pieces created by students of the Barnard and Columbia community.” – Free and open to the public (RSVP here)

Wednesday, April 19th

  • Midday Music featuring Lydia Van Der Swaagh and Cindy Liu, 12:00 PM, Garden Room 2 at Faculty House – Lydia Van Der Swaagh and Cindy Liu will be performing a program featuring Sonata in G Major by Bach, Sonata in A Major by Franck, and Le grand tango by Piazzolla. – Free and open to the public
  • Creative Writing Lecture | Mitchell S. Jackson, 7:00 PM, Room 501 in Dodge Hall – “Mitchell S. Jackson’s debut novel, The Residue Years, was praised by publications including The New York Times, The Paris Review, and The Times of London. Jackson is the winner of a Whiting Award. His novel also won The Ernest J. Gaines Prize for Literary Excellence and was a finalist for the Center For Fiction’s Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize, the PEN/ Hemingway award for first fiction, and the Hurston / Wright Legacy Award. Jackson’s honors include fellowships from TED, the Lannan Foundation, the Bread Loaf Conference, and the Center For Fiction… He serves on the faculty of New York University.” – Free and open to the public

Click for more culture!

Apr

1

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Take some time this week to get your sketch on!

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

Tuesday, April 4th

  • From Heaven to Hell: The Drama of the French Baroque, 7:00 PM, East Gallery, Buell Hall – “This program presents the rich, sublime, sometimes terrifying extremes of French music in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. Soprano Marguerite Krull is joined by period instrumentalists Dongmyung Ahn (baroque violin), David Bakamjian (baroque cello), and Rebecca Cypess (harpsichord) in performing little-known cantatas and instrumental music with spoken commentary. The program includes works by Elisabeth-Claude Jacquet de la Guerre, Johann Jacob Froberger, Jean Bodin de Boismortier, and Louis-Nicolas Clérambault.” – Free RSVP here

And Wednesday and Thursday and Friday

Mar

25

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Edward Albee might be dead, but this original play about Virginia Woolf is giving us life.

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

Wednesday, March 29th

  • On Translating Clarice Lispector with Katrina Dodson, 7:00 PM, Room 501 in Dodge Hall – “The monumental Complete Stories of Clarice Lispector in Katrina Dodson’s much-lauded translation exploded on the U.S. literary scene in 2015. Dodson will speak about the Lispector phenomenon and the joys and challenges of translating her work in conversation with Minna Proctor of The Literary Review and Literary Translation at Columbia (LTAC) Director Susan Bernofsky, Writing.” – Free and open to the public

Thursday, March 30th

  • Silent Matinees: American Slapstick, 12:00 PM, Room 501 in Dodge Hall – “Professor Vito Adriaensens presents a five-part silent cinema matinee series with live music by Belgian jazz musician Adriaan Campo and friends. The fourth part is dedicated to the pitfalls and pratfalls of four of America’s best silver screen comedians. Buster Keaton outdoes Mary Pickford by performing not one but all roles in The Play House. Harold Lloyd conquers skyscrapers and death in Never Weaken. Charley Chase and his wife cheat on each other with each other in Mighty Like a Moose. And the outlandish genius Charley Bowers tells a tall tale with stop motion in Now You Tell One.” – Free and open to the public
  • Liam Young: New Romance, 6:30 PM, Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery (1172 Amsterdam Ave.) – “The Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery presents Liam Young: New Romance, the first U.S. solo exhibition of speculative architect, artist, and filmmaker Liam Young. The exhibition features three recently completed film projects – In the Robot Skies (2016), Where the City Can’t See (2016), and the debut of Renderlands (2017) – as well as a selection of props, materials and research that helped shape the fictional worlds encompassed in each film.” – Free and open to the public; gallery runs from March 30th to May 13th, 2017
  • Barnard Columbia Ancient Drama Group presents “Troades”, Seneca’s “Trojan Women,” 8:00 PM, Minor Latham Playhouse – “The Barnard Columbia Ancient Drama Group is proud to present Seneca’s “Troades” (Trojan Women) – a resistance piece composed around the middle of the first century CE during the reign of Emperor Nero by his tutor. . .This spring’s production applies contemporary symbols and movement to Seneca’s protest in poetry. (This production is in Latin with English supertitles.)” – Tickets available here; additional shows Friday, March 31st at 8:00 PM, and Saturday, April 1st at both 2:00 and 8:00 PM.
  • NOMADS presents West, 8:00 PM, Glicker-Milstein Theatre in the Diana Center – “NOMADS presents West, an original play by Antonia Georgieva and a window into the life and relationships of Virginia Woolf, especially her affair with Vita Sackville-West. The play follows the Leonard and Virginia Woolf as they host a dinner party for their friends Harold Nicolson, Vita Sackville-West and T.S. Eliot. The Woolfs’ maid, Nellie Boxall, provides a humorous foil to the authors’ heavy discussions of life and love. ” – Tickets available here; additional shows Friday, March 31st and Saturday, April 1st at 8:00 PM.

Image used under Creative Commons license,  via Wikimedia Commons

Mar

4

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what beats shakespeare and good conversation on a saturday night?

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

Monday, March 6th

  • People, Place, Purpose | Francine Houben, 6:30 PM, Wood Auditorium in Avery Hall – “With People, Place, Purpose, Francine Houben will present Mecanoo’s designs based on these three fundamental elements. Each project is carefully considered in terms of its cultural setting, place and time, amounting to a unique design statement embedded within its context and orchestrated specifically for the people who use it.” – Free and open to the public

Tuesday, March 7th

  • Pop-up Concert | Miranda Cuckson, 6:00 PM, Miller Theatre – “Miranda Cuckson returns to Miller Theatre’s stage with a solo concert. A favorite of audiences for her great range of repertoire and styles, she’s become one of the most sought after performers of contemporary music. Cuckson is passionate about the role of the performer/interpreter in the creative process, which she has proved at concert halls and festivals, galleries and informal spaces alike. Her Pop-Up Concert offers several new violin works by important contemporary voices, including a premiere by Steve Lehman.” – Free admission, concerts starts at 6 PM, doors open at 5:30 PM

Student theater and more after the jump!

Feb

25

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the original Broadway playbill

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

Saturday, February 25th

  • Naach Nation XV, 7:00 PM, Roone Arledge Auditorium – “Naach Nation is an annual South Asian fusion dance charity showcase hosted by Columbia Taal – Columbia’s South Asian classical fusion dance team. Naach Nation XV will be held on Saturday, February 25, 2017 at Roone Arledge Auditorium. This year’s show will feature performances by Adelphi Sapna, Binghamton Masti, Brown Badmaash, Boston University Khatarnak, Queens College Fanaa, University of Chicago Bhangra, University of Massachusetts Dhadak and Columbia Taal.” – Tickets here; $5.00 with CUID, $8.00 day of
  • The Loving Story, 7:30 PM, Teachers College – “Oscar-shortlist selection THE LOVING STORY is the definitive account of Loving v. Virginia—the landmark 1967 Supreme Court decision that legalized interracial marriage.” – Tickets here; $11.00 with student and senior, $13.00 other

Thursday, March 2nd

  • Silent Matinees: A Star is Born, 12:00 PM, Room 511 in Dodge Hall – “Professor Vito Adriaensens presents a five-part silent cinema matinee series with live music by Belgian jazz musician Adriaan Campo and friends. In this third screening, come marvel at the talents of one of the world’s first international super stars, Mary Pickford. Modern technology is put to shame in Stella Maris, as Pickford tackles not one but two main roles in this touching pictorial drama. Be sure to bring your hankies!” – Free
  • The Mystery of Edwin Drood, 8:00 PM, Lerner Black Box – “The Mystery of Edwin Drood is a musical based on Charles Dickens’ unfinished murder mystery novel of the same title. This show is a hilarious, interactive whodunit mystery musical that allows the audience to enter the action and become the ultimate detectives by having them decide who the murderer is and how the show ends. Staged in a meta-theatrical manner by the Music Hall Royale, a traveling Victorian theater troupe full of just as many colorful characters as the roles they play, this charming and inventive musical is sure to intrigue and entertain any musical or mystery lover.” – Tickets here; additional shows on Friday, March 3rd and Saturday, March 4th, both at 8:00 PM
  • CU Players Presents: The Fairytale Lives of Russian Girls, 8:00 PM, Glicker-Milstein Theatre – “CU Players presents The Fairytale Lives of Russian Girls intertwining reality with classic Russian folklore, and seamlessly placeing them within a single world where we face evil witches, angry bears, and potatoes with minds (and eyes) of their own. This show is about magic, movement, fantasy, and the dark twisty bits of the mind. But more than that, this is theatre that begs to be done in a post-inauguration world: we have found witches where we were expecting grandmothers and bears where we were expecting boyfriends. This show imbues courage that tells people this is not the time for running away or hiding. This is the time to stand up and fight. This is a show about taking action.” – Tickets here; additional shows on Friday, March 3rd and Saturday, March 4th, both at 8:00 PM
  • Pericles, Prince of Tyre, 8:00 PM, Minor Latham Playhouse – “Incest and intrigue, pirates and prostitutes, bitter revenge and providential reunions: Shakespeare’s collaborative Pericles was popular in its day, scorned by Shakespeare’s great rival Ben Jonson, and mysteriously omitted from the 1623 collected edition of his plays. Shakespeare’s first, experimental foray into stage tragicomedy, Pericles embodies the attractions of early-modern popular theatre, and provides a uniquely challenging work for contemporary performance. ” – Tickets here; additional shows on Friday, March 3rd at 8:00 PM and Saturday, March 4th at both 3:00 PM and 8:00 PM

Shakespeare via Philip Chetwinde

Feb

18

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New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musibwogcally/theatrically-inclined on campus.

Saturday, February 18th

  • Bhangra in the Heights X, 7:30 PM, Roone Arledge Auditorium – “Columbia University Bhangra is proud to announce our tenth annual Bhangra performance showcase on Saturday, February 18, 2017. Bhangra is a dance form native to Punjab, a state in northern India, and Bhangra in the Heights has a commitment to showcasing the best Bhangra dance teams in the tri-state area. Get ready for a night of stunning routines, vibrant colors, and dazzling energy!” – Tickets here; $5.50 with CUID, $7.50 day of

Monday, February 20th

  • An Evening with the Monochord: Global Perspectives in Music, Math, and History, 6:15 PM, Second Floor Common Room in the Heyman Center – “Music theorists Guangming Li, Joon Park, and David Cohen each examine how early philosophers used the monochord to address musical and mathematical problems from the sixth century BCE to the fifteenth century. Relying on archeological evidence and music-theoretical texts, Li will discuss the derivation of a chromatic scale in the Warring-States Period (475-221 BCE). Park will compare insights in ancient Greek and 15th century Korean court music to show how the monochord shaped conceptions of musical space as relating to motion. Cohen will examine the role of the monochord in research on harmonics from Pythagoras through Ptolemy.” – Free
  • Modern Design Education: An Epistemological Account, 6:30 PM, Wood Auditorium in Avery Hall – “Zeynep Çelik Alexander is the third annual Detlef Mertins Lecturer on the Histories of Modernity. . . Her work focuses on the history of modern architecture since the Enlightenment. After being trained as an architect at Istanbul Technical University and Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design, she received her PhD from the History, Theory, and Criticism Program at MIT. . . The Detlef Mertins Lecture on the Histories of Modernity is an annual lecture in honor of the life and work of Detlef Mertins (1954-2011). The series is organized by Keller Easterling, Felicity Scott, Barry Bergdoll and Dean Amale Andraos. Previous speakers include Lucia Allais and Craig Buckley.” – Free and open to the public.

More Art

Feb

13

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Earlier today, Columbia University, along with sixteen other academic institutions, jointly filed an amicus brief detailing their position on the recent executive order on immigration from President Trump.

The institutions include all of the members of the Ivy League, as well as Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Chicago, Duke University, Emory University, Johns Hopkins University, MIT, Northwestern, Stanford University, and Vanderbilt University. Each of the universities included statements explaining their specific interests as institutions that have “a global mission, and each derives immeasurable benefit from the contributions of diverse students, faculty, and scholars from around the world.” These individual statements emphasize the scholarly interests, but also allude to the importance of ideals such as free speech and equality, which are specifically mentioned in a number of the statements of interest.

The core of the argumentation of the brief falls under one distinct heading, that “International Students, Faculty, and Scholars Are Vitally Important to Amici, the United States, and the World More Generally,” which is then addressed in four more explicitly stated elements of argument; these are:

  • Each Amicus is Home to a Significant Number of Students, Faculty, and Scholars who are Citizens of Other Nations
  • These International Students, Faculty, and Scholars Contribute to Amici’s Campuses in a Variety of Ways
  • The Enrollment and Employment of International Students, Faculty, and Scholars at Amici Universities Benefits the United States and the World More Generally
  • Amici Endeavor to Attract the Best Students, Faculty, and Scholars from Around the World

The argumentation is then emphasized by statements under the heading that “The Executive Order Harms Students, Faculty, Scholars, and Universities” before the concluding sentiment of the brief is offered. The universities that filed the brief, in their joint conclusion, point to the decision by the Ninth Circuit appellate court and reference it specifically in stating why the included universities “support the relief sought by the Petitioners and Intervenor-Plaintiff” in maintaining the stay on the executive order.

You can find the full text below:

Full text is after the jump

Feb

11

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New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

Monday, February 13th

  • East of Venice: La Serenissima as seen from its eastern frontiers, 5:30 PM, The Italian Academy – “Viewing the history of the Venetian Republic through the lens of its neighbors in the Balkans and its Mediterranean frontiers, this international panel of specialists examines the various exchanges—cultural, linguistic, and religious, among others—between the Ottoman and the Venetian worlds, between East and West.” Panel includes Patricia Fortini Brown of Princeton, Larry Wolff of NYU, Molly Greene of Princeton, and Daphne Lappa of the University of Crete. – Free registration, here
  • An Organized System of Instructions | Martin Beck, 6:30 PM, Wood Auditorium in Avery Hall – “Martin Beck will speak about his two-year exhibition project, titled Program, that manifested through a sequence of interventions, installations, events, and displays at the Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts at Harvard University between 2014 and 2016. Program focused on the institution’s modes, formats, and sites of communication with its various constituencies and drew upon the exhibition histories, academic pursuits, and institutional development of the Carpenter Center during its founding period in the 1960s. Beck’s exhibition pulled that history into the present, and then reflected the institution’s aspirations back onto its contemporary self.” – Free and open to the public.

More events after the jump!

Feb

4

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New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

Saturday, February 4th

  • Marcus Roberts Trio, 8:00 PM, Miller Theatre – “The long-running Marcus Roberts Trio makes their Miller debut, shining a light on their unique and virtuosic style. Each member of the Trio shares equally in leading and changing, displaying their innate connection to the music and each other.” – Tickets $7-$30, here

Monday, February 6th

  • Virgil Abloh | “Everything In Quotes”, 6:30 PM, Wood Auditorium in Avery Hall – “A lecture, “Everything In Quotes” by Virgil Abloh with a response by Michael Rock. Virgil Abloh is a longtime creative consultant to Kanye West and the founder of the award-winning luxury fashion label Off-White™. . . He was nominated for a Grammy Award for Album Packaging for his creative direction of the 2011 album Watch the Throne by Kanye West and Jay Z.” – Free, open to the public
  • NYSAF Reading Series: WHAT A SHAME ABOUT ME by Eric Bogosian, 7:00 PM, Glicker-Milstein Blackbox Theater in the Diana Center – “Cara, a single mom in her 50’s, is surprised to find an old boyfriend in her yoga class. She must deal with the proverbial fork in the road.” – A free reading, but RSVP here

Click for more art!

Dec

3

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Even though there's no snow outside, let the arts bring you holiday spirit!

Even though there’s no snow outside, let the arts bring you holiday spirit!

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

Sunday, December 4th

Tuesday, December 6th

  • Curtis on Tour Chamber Ensemble, 6:00 PM, Miller Theatre– “The orchestral nature of Brahms’s G minor piano quartet, No. 25, along with its irresistible Gypsy-style final movement, makes it one of the finest of the genre. Emerging stars from the Curtis Institute of Music perform alongside their mentor, Ayane Kozasa, as they take on this multifaceted piece in our final Pop-Up Concert of 2016.” – Free tickets here.

What about the rest of the week?…

Nov

19

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macys-parade-1979

Turkey Day is coming quickly, but first, some arts events!

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

Sunday, November 20th

Tuesday, November 22nd

  • Columbia/Barnard V-Day Presents “PENDULUM”, 5 PM, Sulzberger Parlor on the 3rd floor of Barnard Hall – “P E N D U L U M is a multimedia sensory exhibit swinging you between depressive and manic states. Through photography, music and sound, video, performance art and dance, this space immerses you in artists’ experiences of mental disorder. The Barnard V-Day Collective invites you to experience the exhibit on November 22, 5-8pm in Sulz Parlor, Barnard Hall. Visitors are welcome to come at any point during the exhibit to experience the work. There will be a talk back held at 7:30pm where viewers are invited to dialogue with the artists.” An auction of selected pieces will follow the exhibit. Tickets are $5.50 with CUID
  • loadbang at the Miller Theatre, 6 PM, Miller Theatre – “Each member of the unparalleled ensemble loadbang is a double threat, composing or arranging every piece on the program for this Pop-Up Concert. Their unique lineup of baritone voice, bass clarinet, trumpet, and trombone makes for a one-of-a-kind contemporary music experience, as each selection they perform must be composed just for them.” Admission is free, and doors open at 5:30.

Picture via Wikimedia Commons, by Jon Harder

Nov

12

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the_creation_of_adam

“God, is that you? Columbia needs you.”

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

Saturday, November 12th

  • A Night of Sufi Music and Love, 7:30 PM, Lerner Party Space – “The night will be opened by Chris Janigian and Chris Atamian, performing Armenian Poetry with English translations. The evening will feature Amir Vahab, one of New York’s most distinguished composers and vocalists of Sufi and folk music. He will be joined by his ensemble for a performance of Rumi poetry and Sufi music, in Persian with English interpretations.” Tickets here.

Sunday, November 13th

  • Middle Eastern Dance Conference (MEDC), 3 PM, Lerner Party Space – “The 9th Annual Middle Eastern Dance Conference will feature collegiate bellydance troupes from all over the East Coast and two world-renowned bellydancers, Maki Moves and Laura Propenko.” – Tickets here – $5 with CUID

Tuesday, November 15th

  • Poetry Reading: Dawn Lundy Martin & Anne Waldman, 7:00 PM, Sulzberger Parlor – “Dawn Lundy Martin is the author of three books of poetry, including Life in a Box Is a Pretty Life. . . She is a founding member of the Black Took Collective, a group of experimental black poets, and teaches at the University of Pittsburgh. Anne Waldman is the author of more than 40 collections of poetry and poetics, including the recent Voice’s Daughter of a Heart Yet to Be Born. . . She is a co-founder, with Allen Ginsberg, of the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at Naropa University.”

Maybe God can save us. Until then, we have the arts.

Nov

9

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Honestly, what the fuck.

Honestly, what the fuck.

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

Wednesday, November 9th

  • Mid-Day Music with Kira Daglio-Fine on Jazz Saxophone, 12:00 PM, Garden Room 2 in Faculty House – Kira Daglio-Fin will be performing a program of unannounced selections. This event is free.
  • Opening Reception: residues, 6-8 PM, Louise McCagg Gallery on the 4th floor of the Diana Center – “Of childhood, sexuality, process, and corporeality—residues index activity. The exhibition features works that are linked not by textual but by textural references to hybrid materialities and states of becoming.”
  • Creative Writing Lecture: Ottessa Moshfegh, 7:00 PM, 501 Dodge Hall – “Ottessa Moshfegh is the author of McGlue, Eileen, and a forthcoming collection of short stories, Homesick for Another World. She lives in California.” – Enter through the 3rd floor entrance on Columbia’s campus

Let art heal you. Click for more events!

Oct

29

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Halloween Costume-Wearers or just Art Majors? The world may never know.

“Be safe this Halloweekend, so you can check out all the arts happening next week!”

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/ theatrically-inclined on campus.

Sunday, October 30th

  • Center for the Core Curriculum presents “Bacchae,” 4:00 PM, Miller Theatre – “Euripides’ Bacchae, produced in 405 B.C., dramatizes the introduction of the religion of Dionysus to Greece. . . A central text of the Literature Humanities curriculum, the Bacchae brings to life the tension between the rational and the irrational in Ancient Greek culture, and in our own.” Free and open to Columbia University students and staff.

Tuesday, November 1st

  • A Fresh View: Primo Levi’s Complete Works, 5:30 PM, The Italian Academy – “Best known as an Italian Jewish survivor of the Auschwitz concentration camp who wrote lucid testimony about wartime, Primo Levi (1919–1987) also published essays, poetry, commentary, and fiction. His unforgettable work will be presented by editor Ann Goldstein and professor Marco Belpoliti.” Free, but register on the event page.
  • Openings and Archives: Art-Making & Movement-Building, 12:00 PM, 302 Barnard Hall – “Artist, writer, and activist Sabra Moore reads from her forthcoming memoir Openings and shares original archival materials now housed in the Barnard College Archives and Special Collections. The collection and memoir feature over 180 different art works and 79 individual artists, covering a fascinating range of topics, from the documentation of WAR (Women Artists in Revolution) Women’s Services (the first legal abortion clinic in NY), and the Heresies Collective, to the 1984 demonstration against MoMA’s lack of inclusivity in its collections.” – Register here.

Are there any spooky arts events later in the week?

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