Sep

6

Classes We Wish We Could Take, Installment #1

Written by


captain
Bwog found this review while browsing classes on CULPA, and was shocked to discover that the class discussed actually exists. Shocked, and envious of the lucky six who enrolled.

“On the first day you realize that this class is not a normal Columbia seminar. The class is broken up into two watches, and each student is given a rank—depending on his or her maritime knowledge and experience. Prof. McCaughey becomes the Captain.” 

Complete text of the review, with class description, after the jump…

Early American Maritime Culture

2 December 2003

I really enjoyed this class. It was one of the best courses I’ve taken at Columbia. On the first day you realize that this class is not a normal Columbia seminar. The class is broken up into two watches, and each student is given a rank–depending on his or her maritime knowledge and experience. Prof. McCaughey becomes the Captain. Unlike the authoritarian captains of our past Bob is extremely friendly offering a great sense of humor, his extensive knowledge, and the best Socratic management style(more listening than talking) I’ve seen at this school. Early on work is done within watches. As the class deals with learning unfamiliar material–such as sailing equipment, methods and how to navigate before GPS, the team structure is very helpful. After watch projects everyone begins to make websites on topics that touch on what is learned in class. This process is pretty easy, I never had made a website before(I’m not very good with computers at all) but I managed to learn how to quickly, and am coming out of a history course with a powerful new skill. After the first site everyone is given the option of working solo, in pairs or teams to make the next two. Overall this class was great, I learned a lot of new material, in a refreshing new way. Classes are fun, and much more casual than any other course I’ve taken. Work is not very bad, you really have the option of putting as much time as you want into the course. I highly recommend taking this course

Workload: Three websites, read two books: Two Years Before the Mast, and Moby Dick

HIST BC4410x Approached By Sea: Early American Maritime Culture 4 pts. The Atlantic Ocean in the sighting, settling, and formation of three American colonial cultures; the early U.S. as an international maritime presence; and the decline of the Atlantic in the material and imaginative development of mid-19th-century America. Approach will be interdisciplinary and will use the Internet.

 

Autumn 2006

Call Number: 04970

Tu 2:10p – 4:00p

805 Altschul Hall

R. McCaughey

 

Tags:

3 Comments

  1. he also teaches  

    the social history of columbia. also a very great class but in retrospect a little too much navel-gazing

  2. helen of troy

    mccaughey is tha bomb -- Deep Sea Thought might be his best

© 2006-2015 Blue and White Publishing Inc.