May

26

31 Comments

  1. wait

    but I thought the economy was getting better....?

    • who'd you hear that from?

      obama?


      BAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

      - pissed off, feeling betrayed democrat / naive 19 year old who cast the first vote of his life to Obama

      • Oh for fuck's sake  

        You're fucking 23. You have nothing to feel betrayed about. You goddamn fetus.

        Signed: A 22-year-old with perspective

      • Anonymous

        Guess you haters were right... I shouldn't have spent upwards of 200k to study Art History. Yet there is a happy ending to this fairy tale where the joke is on the students who actually toiled to earn a degree in a useful field. See, the incumbent and future president from 2012-2106 will dig deeper and deeper into your pockets to re-purpose your cash into my bank account.

        So all those well-deserved, long hours in Butler instead of drinking in revelry with your friends will be more in more in vain with every tax increase!! Why work towards finding a cure for cancer when you can learn about why foucault was secretly a feminist and get schwasted with football players (so hawt omg!). Why incentivize the productive class with tax-breaks when the rest of us sane people can just sap their (admittedly diminishing) returns and not even work! GObama!!

        • CS Major

          There are three times as many students graduating every year as there were 30 years ago, yet fewer CS grads. It used to be 40,000 a year — that's about where it is now, but a few years ago it was only 25,000 a year.

          I'm not confused because of the money difference. I'm confused because I feel like CS is getting much cooler and humanities is pretty much the same: art history hasn't changed that much, except there's another 30 years of art and a few more layers of impenetrable theory before you're allowed to actually deal with the thing itself. Thirty years ago we were programming with punchcards, now we have internet watches.

          Even if Art History was payed twice as CS I wouldn't do it, because I happen to think robots are fucking awesome. I just don't understand how no one wants to study CS.

          • Anonymous

            CS is hard. Art history is much more approachable. We need to change that.

          • Well fuck  

            Guess columbia students are just stupid...shoulda gone to harvard

          • Anonymous

            I'm the OP and a CS major. I can tell you are too since you didn't detect the sarcasm of my prose :P

            My point was that the world does not need the humanities majors as much as it needs STEM majors. No number of papers about the extent of social stratification in the Early Dynastic Period will ever balance the budget, find clean/sustainable energy sources, cure AIDs/cancer/heart-disease/blindness/deafness, treat mental illness, increase longevity, decrease crime, end world hunger, improve communications, and make life easier and better.

            All ships rise with the rising tide. Today, the average middle class American probably lives at LEAST as comfortably as King Louis XIV of France. Technology tangibly improves the general public's quality of life.

            That is why I get so angry when I see my supremely-talented and undoubtedly brilliant peers studying comparative ethnicities. Given our privilege, it is our responsibility to take advantage of our extraordinary resources at Columbia to improve the world.

          • Alum

            It doesn't matter...everyone goes to work for banks and makes shits ton of money and forgets about the issues that they were so passionate about at Columbia...It's so sad :( People, don't ever leave Columbia!

          • WTF  

            Columbia sucks they hate us undergrads you just forgot about that since you have been away for so long.

          • Anonymous

            I don’t think you understand the privilege and comparative ethnic studies that you talk about. Actually, it’s obvious you don’t understand a lot of which you speak. It’s a bold and ignorant rhetorical move to lump humanities majors together and claim that they all study “social stratification in the Early Dynastic Period.” It’s ignorant to think that people in STEM fields can accomplish all (if any) the things you describe on your ridiculous list. It’s just as ignorant to imply in your earlier post that anthropology and women’s and gender studies majors don’t work hard and use their free time to get drunk and try to sleep with football players. It leads me to ask if you’ve ever taken the time to learn what any of these disciplines are about, or if you’re too busy rolling your eyes when you realize they’re not STEM fields. Given your attitude, you might be surprised to hear that some of your CS professors have earned degrees in the humanities. Amazingly enough, the choice of college major doesn’t permanently relegate anyone to unemployment and papers on Archaic Egypt and Foucault.

            You say that “All ships rise with the rising tide.” (It’s more eloquently and normally said “A rising tide lifts all boats” but whatever.) Is that really true in this country? There’s the statistically disproportionate incarceration of black males, for one. Hey, there’s Trayvon Martin and numerous cases like his. We can “decrease crime” if we can just study something in a STEM field, but not investigate the racial elements that played into Martin’s murder and the initial release of Martin’s killer. Why don’t we look at your chosen field, computer science? Why might 91% of software developers be male? Why is it that women earned fewer than 15% of bachelor’s degrees awarded in 2011? Why were only 3.2% of bachelor’s degrees in CS awarded to black students? Surely it can’t be the overtly white and male representations of computer scientists and programmers (brogrammers, The Social Network, etc.), nor the attitudes of classmates like you, who react with anger and ignorant stereotyping when Columbians pursue comparative ethnic studies or women’s and gender studies. (Just a note, the quality of life of the “average middle class American” is appallingly better than many of those who live in other countries. Colonialism and slavery sort of fucked things up for other people and places.)

            If you think a major in computer science precludes you from knowing any of this or talking about the humanities less ignorantly, then you’re wrong. Case in point, I just graduated as a CS major.

            (To the other CS major on this thread, there has been an increase in bachelor’s degrees given in CS. It doesn’t seem to be a maligned field and is definitely growing in popularity. That’s probably due to students realizing that the unemployment rate and median salary are pretty great for those who graduate with a CS major. That, or a lot of them watched The Social Network.)

          • Look at what you did, Bwog

            This is the result of not enough Bwog posts and a summer break.

            Columbia kids writing essays of their own volition after going cold turkey after the spring semester.

          • Anonymous

            So I thought a lot about it, and I think it boils down to this: Why do we teach math to people who aren't going to become mathematicians? In order to give them a certain set of thinking skills. Why do we have humanities majors? Because it's good for a society to have people who have a different set of thinking skills, the set gained by studying the humanities.

            It's not about the job your major prepares you for; it's about the skills you develop through your coursework. Anyone who's worked with other human beings for more than five minutes knows that thinking skills are as important as specialized technical skills, and that life skills (like the capacity not to be a jerk) are probably more important than anything you'll learn in school. Some people are designed to learn one set of thinking skills and life skills by studying Computer Science; some people can better learn thinking skills and life skills by studying Philosophy. Why should the two hate on one another unnecessarily?

            Also, if it takes educating 300000 junk humanities majors to get one Matthew Weiner (creator of Mad Men) or Mitchell Hurwitz (creator of Arrested Development), then by god, let them eat Sophocles! Otherwise, what will all of the computer science majors do with their bundles of disposable income and envy?

          • Anonymous

            lol I agree but the best examples of humanities majors you could come up with are the creators of two (albeit great) comedies?

          • Anonymous

            sorry, meant T.V. shows. Obviously Mad Men is not a comedy.

          • Anonymous

            Also, persuasion balances budgets, not math. Persuasion makes people lose weight and get healthier, not math. For that matter, talk therapy helps reduce mental illness (often in combination with drugs, but all drugs and no talk makes johnny continue to be an unhappy boy). The humanities teach you to persuade people, not STEM fields.

            Also also, easier =\= better. Science is great at making life easier. Whether or not science is great at making life better is harder to tell, and far outside the realm of scientific study. Honestly, questions like that are usually left up to humanities majors.

  2. Anonymous

    This bar is what I will miss most this summer.

  3. PhotoShoped

    how come i can't see the camera's reflection in the window, but i can see other people? CONSPIRACY THAT'S WHY!

  4. Anonymous

    Man, Bwog goes crazy during the summer. Are your internships/jobs/chilling out times that boring?

    • HardCoreCC  

      Yeah man I have full time internships this summer at Goldman, JP, Google and Facebook. So easy....Hell without taking my 50 credits a semester(easy 4.0 lolz) I don't even need to wake up before 2pm. What, you think that is a lot of work? It is the only hope I have of being employed in a few years and having a successful and happy life. GET AT ME BRO!

  5. dear lord  

    only on Bwog would a post about a silly sign posted at a bar turn into a STEM vs humanities debate.

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