Daily Archive: October 5, 2017

Oct

5

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On Thursday, a group of students walked into Columbia Professor Suzanne Goldberg’s undergraduate seminar in Gender Studies carrying signs and reading a list of their grievances aloud. They also handed out a modified version of her syllabus that discusses Title IX requirements, and how Columbia – and Prof. Goldberg herself – violate them.

In the video, Prof. Goldberg can be seen telling the students that they are interrupting her class and asking them to leave before returning to the board.

Although regarded as a leading expert in gender and sexuality law, Prof. Goldberg has been at the center of much controversy regarding her appointment as interim Title IX coordinator last year. No Red Tape, a University organization that “works to end sexual and domestic violence in our campus communities”, claims that she has a history of covering up sexual assault cases in favor of protecting Columbia’s image, and as the University’s Rules Administrator, has a “vested interest in discouraging or inhibiting students from exercising their Title IX rights.”

Oct

5

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Trying to figure out this mysterious combination of numbers like

Ever wondered why your friends’ UNIs are all super cool and yours is lame? Or vice versa? So have we. There’s not much rhyme or reason to the assignment process, it turns out. Senior staffer Sarah Dahl got the scoop from Chris Dowden, Directory of Identity and Access Management for the Columbia Information Security Office.

My UNI is sd3005–which is unique not only because it slyly refers to the Childish Gambino classic, but also because it’s only two letters, instead of three. Luckily, as I’ve learned through my investigation, UNIs only include three initials if your middle name is registered with the university. Thank god mine wasn’t, because my initials are SMD.

On to the facts!

UNIs are given out by a computer, according to Mr. Dowden. “When a new student, faculty member, or employee arrives at the University, their name/information is entered into either the Student or HR system which in turn is transmitted to the system that manages and creates UNIs (the “Identity Management System”). When the Identity Management System detects a new person, it generates a new UNI.”

U O E N O

Oct

5

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Schermerhorn Extension is frightening enough.

Science of Psych is a rite of passage for all potential psych majors and so are its psych studies that all students are subjected to. Having to to undergo 9 hours of testing, one is never fully in control of what one is subjected to. You hope that you might be participating in one relating to food, but most of the time you are sorely mistaken. 

Our story begins one chilly October evening as I made my way to the catacombs that are Schermerhorn Extension. The imposing, ugly structure cast a dark shadow as I ambled through its heavy, wood doors. With the location on my phone, I navigated the labyrinth to the psych study room. There is no one there. Then, I saw something that made my blood run cold.

A water bug, the size of a cinnamon bear, crawled out of a grate on the floor. Waiting impatiently, I wandered towards the water fountain for a drink. Pressing the button, brown liquid flowed out warmly across my cheek. I shuddered and backed into a wall of rusty push pins. Slightly bothered, I scurried back to the room, which I thought was the location of the study.

but I didn’t die

Oct

5

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World-renowned Bharatanatyam dancer Mallika Sarabhai and her performance troupe, The Darpana Dance Company, come to Barnard. New Bwogger Ana Rael attends.

Last night the Barnard Department of Dance and South Asia Institute of Columbia brought renowned Bharatanatyam performer and activist, Mallika Sarabhai and the Darpana Dance Company to the intimate Glicker-Milstein Theatre for a dance-lecture. Sarabhai is a highly acclaimed classical Indian dancer that has been in the spotlight since a very young age. Sarabhai is known for using dance and performance art as a medium for social change focusing on issues like violence against women, marginalized voices in India and global climate change. Tonight’s performance featured excerpts from the company’s current touring show Finding My Voice, with pieces written by both Sarabhai and her son, Revanta. Many of the dances also featured Pooja Purohit and Hemvati Bhaumik with music by Jayan Nair.

Sarabhai at a TED Talk in 2009.

The night opened with a warm greeting as the house lights came up and Sarabhai welcomed the slightly overfilled theatre with a smile. Sarabhai began with anecdotes attributing her origins in classical indian dance to her mother Mrinalini, the founder of The Darpana Academy of Performing arts and acclaimed Bharatanatyam dancer. Growing up watching and learning the language of the Bharatanatyam dance, Sarabhai discovered her passion for the art as well as its political, empathetic and spiritual power. The first piece of the evening was derived from the sound of the dance class. “Wood on wood,” explained Sarabhai referring to the sound of a wooden stick and board tool used for rhythm. Each of the four dancers played these instruments and spoke traditional sounds called bols in order to create the song. The piece was designed to be complicated and precise as many of the traditional moves require. The ensemble worked completely in unison keeping the pace of the song as well as moving together. It was beautiful to watch the artists connect with each other and the audience through smiles and looks of recognition. Despite the required precision and exactitude, the dancers never became robotic or cold. In some instances Sarabhai would smile at her son or a member of the audience and it no longer felt like a performance, but rather a conversation.

Mallika Sarabhai via Pinterest

But that’s not all…

Oct

5

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Happening Around The World: You know when you have to give a presentation in class, and it feels like something’s caught in your throat, and you just can’t talk right? Theresa May does too – yesterday, she gave a disastrous and oft-interrupted speech on Brexit, a disastrous and oft-interrupted venture. #justtorythings (BBC)

First the McBain bathrooms, and now this.

Happening In The US: Mean Girls Day may have been on Tuesday, but we’ve got some real Plastics in our government this whole week. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, whose ties to Russia are so big because they’re full of secrets, had to go on the record denying that he called President Trump a “moron”. Honestly, he’s not wrong. (CNN, BBC, NPR)

Happening In NYC: Mayor Bill De Blasio has been accused of being a “fake Italian” and has also been asked not to participate in the city’s annual Columbus Day parade, which takes place this Sunday. He eats pizza with a knife and fork, so I’m surprised it took this long. (Gothamist)

Happening At Columbia: Head to the Harriman Institute Atrium at 6:00 PM (IAB Floor 12) for a screening of the documentary film I Came to Testify (60 min) and a discussion with much of the film’s creative team. The film is the story of the war in the Balkans and how 16 Bosnian women who faced rape and imprisonment at the hands of the Serbs “broke history’s great silence – and stepped forward to take the witness stand in an international court of law.”

Overseen: A toenail in Noco. Whoever did this, you’re worse than those people who clip their nails/do their makeup/any sort of personal grooming on the subway.

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