Feb

27

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The sea of chairs is coming in handy

The sea of chairs is coming in handy

For once, reporters weren’t the only audience members in the room—join Bwogger Nadra Rahman in the Satow Room, where CCSC got a little heated last night. 

Last night’s meeting of the Columbia College Student Council (CCSC) was “the most populated student council meeting” seen by USenator Jay Rappaport in two years—for once, the audience seats were packed. The audience was mostly motivated by the proposal that CCSC co-sponsor Israeli Apartheid Week at Columbia (described by its organizers as “a week of programming meant to educate about Palestine, its history and struggles, as well as how it intersects with other indigenous struggles around the world”). The audience, which included members of Columbia/Barnard Hillel and Aryeh, were against any CCSC involvement in the controversial event series. The other main event of the night was the brief question and answer session with Deantini and Dean Kromm, which addressed the usual themes: student wellness and space.

“Zionists are Racist” or “Complete Content Neutrality”?
Columbia University Apartheid Divest (CUAD) had asked CCSC to cosponsor Israeli Apartheid Week, which is to take place from Monday, February 27 to Friday, March 3. This cosponsorship could be nominal only or financial ($10-30) and could be for the entire week or a single event.

How did they vote?

Feb

27

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Columbia is home to many different perspectives regarding the Israel-Palestine conflict.

Besides the demonstration that will take place on Low Plaza between 11 am to 4 pm, a few events will be happening every day this week relating to Israel and Palestine. Check them out to hear the voices of Columbia students and prominent activists on both sides of the issue. 

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

  • 7:30 to 9:30 pm: 50 Years of Occupation: The 1967 Naksa with Prof. Rashid Khalidi (Roone Arledge Cinema, Lerner Hall) ~ CU Apartheid Divest

Thursday

  • “Everything You Wanted to Know about the Israel-Palestinian Conflict and were Too Afraid to Ask” ~ Aryeh (Details and Facebook Event to come)
  • 6 to 9 pm: Natives & Colonists: Pasts & Futures of Palestine with Prof. Joseph Massad (Broadway Room, Lerner Hall)
  • 8 to 10 pm: Trump & Israel at 50 Days: Taking Stock of U.S.-Israel Relations (614 Schermerhorn) ~ Institute for Israel and Jewish Studies

Friday

  • 3 to 5 pm: Teaching Palestine: Scholarship and Resistance (Hamilton 702) ~ CU Apartheid Divest

Photo via Wikipedia

Feb

27

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Good morning, Columbia! Only two more weeks until Spring Break! We can do it! Just keep pushing on!

Happening in the nation: In case you didn’t notice, the Oscars were last night… And there was one hell of a Steve Harvey moment. Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty got caught in an envelope mix-up and accidentally announced La La Land as Best Picture, when the real winner was Moonlight. A day that will live in infamy.

Happening in NYC: If you’re anything like me, you spent this beautiful weekend looking to get cocktails and grub from everyone’s favorite upper west side joint, Jacob’s Pickles. But alas! A fire on Saturday in the apartment buildings above has left Jacob’s Pickles closed indefinitely for repairs. I know, I know, we’re heartbroken too.

Happening on campus: Tonight, Columbia University Women in Law and Politics is hosting New York City Councilman Corey Johnson for a discussion on minority rights under the Trump administration. They’ll be in Lerner 569 tonight from 5:30 to 7:00 pm.

Overseen/Overheard: We found a little ode to the Bwog Slackbot on Saturday night at Beta on the DJ table.

Hey man, rush Beta.

 

Unexpected Party Playlist: Looking to shake up your go-to party playlist? No worries, Bwog is here with some suggestions. Check out these unexpected party classics that will get your pregame rockin’ at a whole new level.

Photo via me.

Feb

26

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artist's rendition of Ivy playoff scenarios

artist’s rendition of Ivy playoff scenarios

If you haven’t heard, this year is the inaugural Ivy League Basketball Tournament, in which four teams will compete in a bracket to determine who will represent the Ivy League in the NCAA tournament. Since the regular season now has a responsibility to assign the top four seeds, instead of just the top one, there are a lot of new tiebreaker scenarios which the Ivy League has to keep track of, especially on the men’s side.

Some of these edge scenarios are downright terrifying.

This morning, the @Ivy_Basketball Twitter account clarified a ruling on tiebreaker rules, sending the league’s team of analysts into a frenzy. Basically, the tweet says that one parameter for breaking ties, the tied teams’ records against other Ivy teams, will refer not just to teams in the tournament, but all eight teams in the league. However, most statistical models were imagining that only the teams who made it into the tournament would matter, so those models became wrong. The league’s tiebreaker incompetence, for its devoted followers, is nothing new.

Here are the rules, per the Ivy League, on who wins a tiebreaker if, for instance, Penn and Columbia end the season tied at 6-8:

  1. Compare the head-to-head record between the tied teams. If one team swept the other, they win.
  2. If still tied, compare the record of each team against the top-ranked team in the league. If that is tied, continue down the list of teams in the league, all the way down to the very last team in the league. Whoever has the better record wins.
  3. If still tied, compare an average of the rankings given to the tied teams by several analytical systems (BPI, RPI, KenPom, Sagarin). Whoever has the better record wins.
  4. If still tied, go to a coin flip.

This new ruling opens up some outs for Columbia. Because of Columbia’s weak out-of-conference performance, they don’t stand a chance to win Tiebreaker 3. But there are scenarios in which Columbia can make the 4-seed, or even the 3-seed, thanks to the new rules. For instance, if the Lions and Penn Quakers both go 2-0 next weekend, and the Yale Bulldogs secure the 3-seed, then Columbia can make the tournament with a Brown win against Cornell. (If you don’t trust me, I encourage you to check out my horrifyingly complex (and poorly formatted) chart of how every scenario works out.)

Here are the basic playoff scenarios that matter to Columbia. For playoff odds not accounting for slightly undefined edge cases, refer to @YaleSportsGroup’s odds:

  • If Columbia does better than Penn this weekend, they’re in the tournament.
  • If Columbia goes 2-0, Penn does not go 2-0, and Yale goes 0-2, the Lions will lock in the 3 seed thanks to their Tiebreaker 2 against Harvard.
  • If Columbia goes 2-0, Penn goes 2-0, and Yale goes 1-1, Penn gets the 4 seed with a Cornell win over Brown, and Columbia gets the 4 seed with a Brown win over Cornell.
  • If Columbia goes 2-0, Penn goes 2-0, and Yale goes 0-2, both Columbia and Penn make the tournament, while Yale falls out. Penn gets the 3 seed unless Dartmouth beats Princeton and Brown beats Cornell (very unlikely).
  • If Columbia beats Brown and loses to Yale, they secure the 4 seed if Penn loses to Harvard, but do not make the tournament if Penn beats Harvard.
  • If Columbia beats Yale and loses to Brown, they secure the 4 seed if Penn loses to Harvard. If Penn defeats Harvard while losing to Dartmouth, things get complicated. Penn gets the 4 if Cornell goes 2-0, and Columbia gets the 4 if Cornell goes 0-2. If Cornell goes 1-1 in this scenario, Penn gets if Princeton beats Dartmouth (likely), and Columbia gets in if Dartmouth beats Princeton.
  • If Columbia and Penn both go 0-2, Dartmouth can secure the 4 seed by beating Princeton. Otherwise, Columbia gets the 4 seed, unless Cornell goes 2-0.

tl;dr – Neither Columbia nor Penn truly control their own destiny. Columbia should try to win, obviously. Beyond that, they want Yale and Penn to lose, they want Brown to beat Cornell, and they want Dartmouth to do well.

But what about some even more confusing scenarios?

Feb

26

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Sick pics.

Bucket List represents the intellectual privilege we enjoy as Columbia students. We do our very best to bring to your attention important guest lecturers and special events on campus. Our recommendations for this week are below, and the full list is after the jump. If you notice any events that have been left off the list, or if you have a correction, please let us know in the comments.

Recommended

  • “Anatomy of the NBA Ecosystem” Tuesday, February 28, 7:00 – 8:00 pm. Lerner Hall. Evan Wasch.
  • “Other Russias: Victoria Lomasko’s Graphic Journalism” Tuesday, February 28, 6:30 – 8:00 pm. IAB. Victoria Lomasko.
  • “Nietzsche 13/13: Irigaray and Nietzsche” Thursday, March 2, 6:15 – 9:15 pm. Jerome Greene Annex. Penelope Deutscher, Marianne Hirsch, Kelly Oliver.
  • “POWER TALK with Loretta J. Mester ’80” Thursday, March 2, 7:00 pm. Sulzberger Parlor. Loretta Mester.

More events after the jump!

Feb

26

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Not a castle, but close

In the interest of contrasting her industrial-modern experience from the other day, Bwog Bagel Amara Banks visited The Burke Library at Union Theological Seminary. Below are some useful stats as well as her opinion of the library. 

Location: 3041 Broadway, New York, NY, 10027. Right on the corner of 121st and Broadway

Hours: Typically 9am-10pm on weekdays; 10am-5pm on Saturdays; 2pm-10pm on Sundays; check the full schedule here

Contact: (212) 851-5606; [email protected]; Twitter @BurkeLibraryUTS

Seats: ~200 seats total, ~20 computers, 20 comfy chairs, 0 seats for talking

Amenities: 

  • Printers: 2 black & white Paw-Print stations
  • Scanners: 3 scanners
  • Chairs: Classic wooden chairs
  • Computers: multiple computer locations throughout the library’s three levels
  • Bathrooms: single-use, gender-neutral bathrooms are located on the first floor
  • Windows: The library’s walls are filled with windows, filling the study spaces with lots of natural light
  • Smoking: The library is located out of Columbia’s main gates so you don’t have to worry about finding a designated smoking area; just go like 20 feet away from the building
  • Books: This is one of the largest Theological libraries in North America. It houses includes the Bonhoeffer Collection, the Gillett Collection of American History and Theology, the Missionary Research Collection, the Sacred Music Collection, and more.

more about Burke Library after the jump

Feb

26

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Ceelo as Oscar golden man at the Grammy’s

The Oscars are important, yes. But, not as important as Bwog, amirite? Who needs the red carpet when you can stomp the zigzagging ramps of Lerner to 505 and meet all the A-listed, definitely-relevant superstars that are Bwog staffers?

Come to Lerner 505 at 7 pm tonight, wear a Valentino full gown, Paul Smith tuxedo or a Givenchy potato sack, and, most importantly, bring your pitches!

Feb

26

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Happening in the world: Long Zhengyang, former assistant chief editor of the Hong Kong Commercial Daily revealed that he was “persecuted” for being supportive of the pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong. (BBC)

Happening in the city (or the state): Rockland County sheriff’s bomb squad removed 2 WWII-era grenades from Tappan Zee Manor Nursing Home. (NBC New York)

Happening on campus: Taiwanese American Student Association and Outreach for Taiwan is holding an interactive workshop on the topic of cross-strait relations under the Trump and Tsai presidencies tomorrow at 2:00 pm in Lerner Broadway Room.

Overheard: *At 116th bus station* “Yeah, it was a good weekend, I’m just glad I don’t go to school here.” *looked up and realized that she was surrounded by Columbia students* “Sorry…”

photo via NBC New York

 

Feb

25

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Jerome Greene Hall, meeting place of the University Senate

Jerome Greene Hall, as usual, was the place to be yesterday afternoon. The place was packed with both senators and literary references, which was the perfect mix for Bwogger Nadra Rahman. 

February’s University Senate session was brief, centering mostly on faculty initiatives and concerns. While the Student Affairs Committee (SAC) updated the Senate on student space and mental health initiatives, no new proposals were introduced on their end. The star of the event had to be the letter written by Faculty Affairs Committee (FAC) co-Chairs Robert Pollack and Letty Moss-Salentijn, in response to PrezBo’s email on President Trump’s refugee and immigration policy.

“We Know No One at Columbia Who Is Not Upset”
PrezBo’s letter, sent on 1:00 am on January 29, positions the University as a defender of core American values, and in particular, of students affected by the so-called Muslim Ban: “It is also true that the University, as an institution in the society, must step forward to object when policies and state action conflict with its fundamental values, and especially when they bespeak purposes and a mentality that are at odds with our basic mission.” He added, “We have learned that generalized fears of threats to our security do not justify exceptions to our founding ideals.”

In response to these sentiments, Pollack and Moss-Salentijn crafted a letter “from the heart,” which was endorsed unanimously by FAC last month. The letter begins with references to 1984 and Fahrenheit 451 (of course), but eventually meanders to the thesis, which is that faculty members need space to assuage their anxieties and to express themselves in this uncertain political climate:

What’s up with this letter, huh

Feb

25

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Imagine an opera but like in Barnard Hall.

Although he doesn’t often go to arts events, Internal Editor and Late Nite Extraordinaire Finn Klauber last night tried his hand out going to a “real” arts event. Although he had only been to Barnard four or five times in recent memory, he found his way to Sulzberger Parlour and the symphonic recital that was awaiting him in that lacquered and effeminate den.

Up until the minute I entered Sulzberger Parlour in Barnard Hall, I had no idea what exactly a “heteronormative to homoextraordinary recital” would actually consist of. The event description seem to just be a smattering of artistic buzzwords interspaced between the names and works of Romantic composers and poets—for all I knew, of course. Entering Sulz Parlour didn’t help to orient me in any way, unfortunately, as the patterned walls illustrated with decorous songbirds, the pseudo-realistic portraits of Barnard presidents, and the Gilded Age furniture all clashed with the modern femininity which Barnard so effortlessly projects.

As I silently pondered whether a broken grandfather clock being placed directly in the cold stare of portrait-Debora Spar were some sort of political statement, the star of the evening, Brenda Patterson, began her introduction. Patterson, an acclaimed mezzo-soprano opera singer and alumna of Juilliard and Barnard, was to perform three different cycles of music: an adaptation of Schumann’s “A Woman’s Love & Life,” with new lyrical poetry adapted from Emily Moore, a performance of a selection from Berlioz and Gautier’s Les Nuits d’Eté, and a new performance of a selection from American songwriter Ricky Ian Gordon.

What was the thematic push in Patterson’s singing?

Feb

25

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Beef soup noodle personified

Staff Writer Timmy Wu reviews Zuo Jie, one of the Chinese food trucks on Broadway, just outside of College Walk. 

For most of the Southeastern/East Asian student population, the Chinese/Thai Food Cart and M2M on Broadway are both indispensable parts of their college life in Morningside Heights. Of course, there is a multitude of authentic and wonderful eateries in K-Town, Chinatown, and Flushing, but amidst the already-cumbersome school work, there really isn’t any reasonable justification to spend four hours to-and-fro for a sudden bout of gastronomical gratification. This is where Chinese Food Cart comes into the picture. Being 7000 miles or so away from home, these food carts are temporal portals through which thousands of soy-sauce-acquainted taste buds may taste their homeland and find solace. However, do these food trucks live up to their 7-dollar-a-banton responsibility?

I will admit that the weather yesterday was so nice that it felt like a treat, rather than a nuisance, to be standing in line for 15 minutes for the Zou Jie (左記)food cart. Being a significantly smaller cart than, say, the Luo Yang Uncle (洛陽大叔) Food Cart, the owners of Zuo Jie have to compromise their efficiency. Their workstation seems rather awkward but not without a system of their own. As I saw the couple (I presume) crossing over or interlacing with each other every 20 seconds, I couldn’t help but pry: “How long have you been here?” “Three years,” the wife reluctantly answered after a few moments of gauging my intention. I wondered what it would be like to work skin-to-skin in, essentially, a metallic box about the size of one-and-a-half bathroom stalls. More importantly, how does that kind of experience factor into Zuo Jie’s flavors?

vicariously eating after the jump

Feb

25

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We love NYU, and we think they’re great, but sometimes our NYU friends like to remind us that we live in an area of town where you can find half of the school’s population in exactly 2 bars on a Saturday night, while they’re downtown roaming around Greenwich Village. (At least my NYU friends do. Is this just a me phenomenon?) I was curious to see if NYU students really have more fun than us, so I asked a few real-life NYU students what they do on a typical Saturday night, and actually spent last Saturday night with a few of them.

First, here’s how last Saturday night went. I took an Uber to West Village with my friend, got my left frontal helix pierced at a tattoo shop on Bleecker Street, and sat in a dorm room in University Hall drinking beer, gin, and tequila and watching basketball with a few boys. Then we met up with their friends and PAID to get into Bar 13 ($5 for girls, $10 for boys: sexism at work?), and left almost immediately because it was very unlit. We stopped by Duane Reade to get a 12-pack of beer, then finished them off on our walk to The Jane. There was a line around the corner, and the NYU friends told my friend and me that it would be worth it, but I was skeptical. When we finally made it to the front, our fakes got denied, and we were asked to leave the building. We Ubered back to West Village? Greenwich Village? and went to some sweaty bar called Pourhouse, which was pretty much exactly like an EC party except bigger than an EC suite, and you had to pay (a lot) for drinks. I lost everyone when I went to the bathroom, so I walked to my friend’s dorm and crashed there.

Read first-hand NYU accounts of downtown nightlife

Feb

25

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the original Broadway playbill

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

Saturday, February 25th

  • Naach Nation XV, 7:00 PM, Roone Arledge Auditorium – “Naach Nation is an annual South Asian fusion dance charity showcase hosted by Columbia Taal – Columbia’s South Asian classical fusion dance team. Naach Nation XV will be held on Saturday, February 25, 2017 at Roone Arledge Auditorium. This year’s show will feature performances by Adelphi Sapna, Binghamton Masti, Brown Badmaash, Boston University Khatarnak, Queens College Fanaa, University of Chicago Bhangra, University of Massachusetts Dhadak and Columbia Taal.” – Tickets here; $5.00 with CUID, $8.00 day of
  • The Loving Story, 7:30 PM, Teachers College – “Oscar-shortlist selection THE LOVING STORY is the definitive account of Loving v. Virginia—the landmark 1967 Supreme Court decision that legalized interracial marriage.” – Tickets here; $11.00 with student and senior, $13.00 other

Thursday, March 2nd

  • Silent Matinees: A Star is Born, 12:00 PM, Room 511 in Dodge Hall – “Professor Vito Adriaensens presents a five-part silent cinema matinee series with live music by Belgian jazz musician Adriaan Campo and friends. In this third screening, come marvel at the talents of one of the world’s first international super stars, Mary Pickford. Modern technology is put to shame in Stella Maris, as Pickford tackles not one but two main roles in this touching pictorial drama. Be sure to bring your hankies!” – Free
  • The Mystery of Edwin Drood, 8:00 PM, Lerner Black Box – “The Mystery of Edwin Drood is a musical based on Charles Dickens’ unfinished murder mystery novel of the same title. This show is a hilarious, interactive whodunit mystery musical that allows the audience to enter the action and become the ultimate detectives by having them decide who the murderer is and how the show ends. Staged in a meta-theatrical manner by the Music Hall Royale, a traveling Victorian theater troupe full of just as many colorful characters as the roles they play, this charming and inventive musical is sure to intrigue and entertain any musical or mystery lover.” – Tickets here; additional shows on Friday, March 3rd and Saturday, March 4th, both at 8:00 PM
  • CU Players Presents: The Fairytale Lives of Russian Girls, 8:00 PM, Glicker-Milstein Theatre – “CU Players presents The Fairytale Lives of Russian Girls intertwining reality with classic Russian folklore, and seamlessly placeing them within a single world where we face evil witches, angry bears, and potatoes with minds (and eyes) of their own. This show is about magic, movement, fantasy, and the dark twisty bits of the mind. But more than that, this is theatre that begs to be done in a post-inauguration world: we have found witches where we were expecting grandmothers and bears where we were expecting boyfriends. This show imbues courage that tells people this is not the time for running away or hiding. This is the time to stand up and fight. This is a show about taking action.” – Tickets here; additional shows on Friday, March 3rd and Saturday, March 4th, both at 8:00 PM
  • Pericles, Prince of Tyre, 8:00 PM, Minor Latham Playhouse – “Incest and intrigue, pirates and prostitutes, bitter revenge and providential reunions: Shakespeare’s collaborative Pericles was popular in its day, scorned by Shakespeare’s great rival Ben Jonson, and mysteriously omitted from the 1623 collected edition of his plays. Shakespeare’s first, experimental foray into stage tragicomedy, Pericles embodies the attractions of early-modern popular theatre, and provides a uniquely challenging work for contemporary performance. ” – Tickets here; additional shows on Friday, March 3rd at 8:00 PM and Saturday, March 4th at both 3:00 PM and 8:00 PM

Shakespeare via Philip Chetwinde

Feb

25

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Columbia Housing lottery number for the Waldorf Astoria: 90/0001

Happening in the Nation: Many major news organizations, including CNN, The New York Times, and BBC, were barred from a White House press briefing on Friday. This move by the Trump administration struck journalists as unprecedented. (CNN)

Happening in New York City: The Waldorf Astoria, arguably New York’s most famous hotel, is shutting down on Wednesday for remodeling, to be reopened in a few years as a much smaller hotel with more residential apartments. (The New York Times)

Happening on Campus: To continue observance of Black History Month, Teachers College is hosting a film screening of The Loving Story, “the definitive account of Loving v Virginia – the landmark 1967 Supreme Court decision that legalized interracial marriage.” The film screening will happen tonight at 7:30pm. Tickets may be purchased here for $11.

Overheard: “… and that’s why I deleted my Grindr.”

Your New York 4-day forecast (sponsored by Spring, your favorite season):
Saturday (Scattered thunderstorms) – High: 58, Low: 36
Sunday (Sunny) – High: 46, Low: 35
Monday (Sunny) – High: 57, Low: 44
Tuesday (Showers) – High: 56, Low: 48
(Disclaimer: weather prone to changes, obviously)

The Waldorf Astoria via Hennem08 

Feb

24

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Mike Smith drive's to the basket for a layup against Brown.

Slow down, you’re doing fine

After crying over the Lions’ consecutive 4 losses, basketball fan and guest writer Gloriana Lopez decided to crunch more numbers than she ever did when she was in SEAS in hopes of finding a way to stop suffering and make the Lions win their games this weekend against Penn and Princeton. She figured out that maybe Mike Smith might be the key to that.

Mike Smith has quickly become one of the best players in the Men’s Basketball team. As a freshman, he has become the second leading scorer, just behind senior Luke Petrasek, and has racked up the 82 assists. But while Smith takes even more shots than Petrasek (30% of all shots in the last four games, compared to Luke’s 19%), he scores significantly fewer points. There’s no doubt that he knows how to put the ball in the basket, since he leads the offense with Petrasek and junior Nate Hickman… but could he be doing better?

Could he?

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