Daily Archive: February 4, 2018

Feb

4

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The wings that go with the sauce are probably INTJ. Just think about it.

JJ’s sauces – they make or break a JJ’s meal, don’t get the credit they deserve, and also have a lot more personality than the majority of guys I’ve met on campus. Being the avid psycho-analyzer that I am, I decided to cast the JJ’s sauces as their perfect Myers-Briggs personality representations. Here’s what I came up with.

Carolina Tangy = ESFJ. Popular, reliable, depends on established laws and traditions. Usually studies in Ref. Indoor voice is very loud, but doesn’t realize it. Everyone likes them.

Garlic Parmesan = ENTP. Sounds promising, but actually kinda annoying. Will switch it up/taste weird depending on what you put it with. Lowkey a narc.

Chipotle Mayo = ISFJ. Grossly underrated. Secretly the best, but doesn’t receive the same recognition as Carolina Tangy/ESFJ. At first seemingly quiet, but substantively good, especially when chicken is involved. Gets stuff done. Full of love.

Mango Habanero = INFP. You either love or hate them. Spread too thin most of the time. Not that great, but is often misunderstood. Personality is very niche. Possibly does drugs.

Barbecue = ESTJ. The foundation of all sauces. Brings everything together; goes well with everyone and everything.Works very hard and never procrastinates; completes all the Lit Hum reading. Represents tradition and order within the JJ’s sauce family. Kinda boring, though.

Thai Chili = ENFP. Wild, but like, in a fun way. Really great at parties. The hype man friend. Sometimes can be a little much. Actually very emotional, but internalizes these emotions.

Feb

4

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If you try this in a computer lab… why?

If you’re worried about hanging on to all of the files from your academic past, Bwog is here to help. Senior Staff Writer Ross Chapman gives the full breakdown on electronically clinging onto those precious college memories.

If you’re a graduating senior who wants to make the most out of your Columbia resources, or if you want to use one class’s slides to study for another exam, you might want to take files from Courseworks and Canvas and download them onto your computer. If you want to make an archive of your Columbia resources like PDF’s and slides, you shouldn’t have to dig through the last four years of your downloads folder. Here’s a quick guide on how to efficiently archive all of your Courseworks materials.

Downloading from Canvas

All classes from the 2017-18 academic year are on Canvas, as well as a few miscellaneous classes from before then. Thankfully, Canvas has an easy mass download feature. Log on to Canvas, press “Account” on the navigation bar, and then select “Files.” This brings you to a list of files. The first folder up should be “My Files,” which includes your Canvas submissions. You can save these, but you might already have them on your computer from when you submitted them.

Click to enlarge.

The rest of the parent folders are the classes you’ve taken. Select a folder, and then hit Ctrl-A or ⌘-A to select all of that class’s files. The top bar will then show a “Download as Zip” button next to the search bar at the top of the page. Canvas will take a bit of time to prepare the download, and will then provide “course_files_export.zip.” Extract the files to wherever you keep your Columbia class documents.

If you don’t yet have anywhere to store your class files, create a new folder! You can organize it however you want, but I would create subfolders for easy navigation, such as “Core Classes,” “Major Classes,” and “Electives.” However you organize, make a unique folder for each class and extract your Canvas .zips to your class folders.

Figure out how to download from Courseworks proper after the jump.

Feb

4

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Russia’s presidential candidate is visiting Columbia!

Bucket List represents the intellectual privilege we enjoy as Columbia students. We do our very best to bring to your attention important guest lecturers and special events on campus. Our recommendations for this sparsely populated reading week are below, with no specifically recommended events. If you notice any events that have been left off the list, or a correction, please leave them in the comments.

Recommended:

  • “Director of Experiments: The Science Behind Democracy and Political Campaigns”, 1 – 2:00 PM, International Affairs Building, Monday
  • Indigenous Peoples and Cultural Freedoms: Implementing the UN Declaration on Indigenous Rights, 7:30 PM – 9:30 PM, Faculty House, Tuesday
  • Spaces and Geographies of Concentration Camps: How to Preserve the Memory of Discrimination, 5 – 7:30 PM, Casa Italiana, Thursday
  • A Conversation with Russian Presidential Candidate Ksenia Sobchak, 6 – 8:00 PM, Kraft Center for Jewish Student Life, Thursday
  • #MeToo and the National Security Space: A Panel Discussion and Dialogue, 4:30 PM – 7:30 PM, International Affairs Building, Friday

Monday, Feb 5th:

  • “Director of Experiments: The Science Behind Democracy and Political Campaigns”, 1 – 2:00 PM, International Affairs Building

Tuesday, Feb 6th:

  • Data, Algorithms, and their Consequences for Society, 2:00 AM, Schapiro CEPSR
  • Book Talk. Ukraine’s Quest For Identity: Embracing Cultural Hybridity In Literary Imagination, 1991–2011, By Maria Rewakowicz, 12 – 2:00 PM, International Affairs Building
  • Clifford Tabin seminar: Genetic underpinning of evolving to unique environments: From limb morphology to metabolism, 4 – 5:00 PM, Schermerhorn Extension
  • Frank Bidart and Eleanor Chai, 7 – 8:30 PM, Barnard Hall
  • Indigenous Peoples and Cultural Freedoms: Implementing the UN Declaration on Indigenous Rights, 7:30 PM – 9:30 PM, Faculty House

Wednesday, Feb 7th:

  • The Trump Administration’s Policy Toward East Asia, 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM, International Affairs Building
  • Molière’s Don Juan: Textual Mobilities, Textual Genealogy, and Material Text, a Case Study, 6 – 8:30 PM, Butler Library

Thursday, Feb 8th:

  • Book Talk. Property Rights In Post-Soviet Russia: Violence, Corruption, And The Demand For Law, By Jordan Gans-Morse, 12 – 2:00 PM, International Affairs Building
  • Spaces and Geographies of Concentration Camps: How to Preserve the Memory of Discrimination, 5 – 7:30 PM, Casa Italiana
  • A Conversation with Russian Presidential Candidate Ksenia Sobchak, 6 – 8:00 PM, Kraft Center for Jewish Student Life
  • LaToya Ruby Frazier, Art as Transformation: Using Photography for Social Change, 6:30 PM, Lenfest Center for the Arts

Friday, Feb 9th:

  • #MeToo and the National Security Space: A Panel Discussion and Dialogue, 4:30 PM – 7:30 PM, International Affairs Building

Saturday, Feb 10th:

  • Yugoslav Experimental Film Symposium, 9 – 5:30 PM, International Affairs Building

Photos via Pexels

Feb

4

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Does Grey’s Anatomy count as the “literary imagination”?

We’re back with Science Fair, Bwog’s weekly curated list of interesting STEM-related talks, symposiums, and events happening on campus. For science and non-science majors alike, our list will bring you events that will satisfy your scientific curiosity for everything from astronomy to zoology, and everything in between.

For anyone, related-majors and non-majors alike:

  • The Medical Imagination: Literature and Health in the Early United States
    • Monday, February 5, 6-7:30pm, The Heyman Center, Second Floor Common Room
    • “In this lecture, Sari Altschuler [Assistant professor of English at Northeastern University] will be talking about her new book on the history of the medical imagination… In reframing the historical relationship between literature and health, The Medical Imagination provides a usable past for our own conversations about the imagination and the humanities in health research and practice today.”
  • Director of Experiments: The Science Behind Democracy and Political Campaigns
    • Monday, February 5, 1-2pm, International Affairs Building
    • “As an expert in political psychology and research methodologies, in 2007, Nickerson helped establish the Analyst Institute, a center that conducts field experiments on campaign strategies. This experience prepared him to help both Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton with their campaigns. Join Professors Donald Green and Paul Lagunes in a conversation with Professor Nickerson about the use of advanced data analysis in politics.”
  • Data, Algorithms, and their Consequences for Society
    • Tuesday, February 6, 2:30 PM, Schapiro CEPSR Davis Auditorium
    • “Cathy O’Neil earned a Ph.D. in math from Harvard, was a postdoc at the MIT math department, and a professor at Barnard College where she published a number of research papers in arithmetic algebraic geometry… She is a regular contributor to Bloomberg View and wrote the book Weapons of Math Destruction: how big data increases inequality and threatens democracy.”

Click here for more science!

Feb

4

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This is the 52nd Superb Owl.

Happening in the world: Apparently North Korea has been dodging the sanctions placed on them in 2017 through fishing contracts with the country of Mozambique. This comes after a UN report was released claiming that North Korea earned $200 million last year through sanction violations. (CNN)

Happening in the US: Girl Scouts in the Savannah, GA area are lobbying to get a nearby bridge renamed, as it currently honors a segregationist and white supremacist former governor. Among the options they hope to present to lawmakers is the “Juliette Gordon Low Bridge,” named after the Savannah native who founded the Girl Scouts of the USA. The Girl Scouts say that the effort is primarily to teach young girls about civic engagement. (New York Times; soft paywall)

Happening in NYC: A new position has been created in the MTA: “Wayfinders” wearing orange vests are there to give directions and a smile to anyone in the subway who might need it. The Wayfinders are part of Governor Andrew Cuomo’s Subway Action Plan, an $836 million initiative designed to address the issues plaguing the ailing MTA. (NY Times; soft paywall)

Happening on Campus: If you don’t have anyone to watch the Super Bowl with, don’t fret— Undergraduate Student Life is hosting a Super Bowl viewing party today. It starts at 6:30 in the Lerner Cinema (potentially AKA Roone Cinema?); there will be food, a raffle, and giveaways.

Overheard: [shouted at 3 am] “Oh, fuck you, Jared!”

Song Rec:

Owl via Public Domain Pictures

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