Jan

28

USenate Reveals Plans for Addressing ROTC, Military Engagement

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In a press release today, the University Senate announced a “comprehensive three-part process in the spring 2011 semester to address the Reserve Officers Training Corps and other issues related to the University’s engagement with the Armed Forces of the United States.” The full press release is after the jump, but here are some takeaways:

  • The eventual goal is to provide the Senate with information to adequately make a recommendation on Columbia’s relationship with armed forces, including the issue of ROTC on campus.
  • The Task Force has launched a non-partisan website with background history of ROTC on campus and information about what further actions could take place in the future.
  • There will be a series of hearings held in February to provide a “forum for individuals to discuss the issues in an open and constructive manner.” The hearings will take place on February 7, 15, and 23.
  • On March 4, the Task Force will submit a final report reflecting student opinion to the Senate.

NEW YORK, January 28, 2011—The Columbia University Senate Task Force on Military Engagement announced today a comprehensive three-part process in the spring 2011 semester to address the Reserve Officers Training Corps and other issues related to the University’s engagement with the Armed Forces of the United States.
The goal of this process is to provide the University Senate adequate information and context to issue a recommendation on Columbia’s engagement with the Armed Forces of the United States by the end of the 2010-2011 academic year, including formal participation in the Reserve Officers Training Corps. The process will be non-partisan in nature with a focus on listening to the opinions of the University community.

First, the Task Force has created a non-partisan information resource website. This website does not advocate for any side, but rather provides basic information on the Reserve Officers Training Corps program, its history at Columbia University, and additional ongoing exchanges with the Armed Forces of the United States. Relevant historical documents are also made available. The website may be found at http://www.columbia.edu/cu/senate/militaryengagement/.

Second, the Task Force will hold a series of University-wide public hearings. These hearings will provide a forum for individuals to discuss the issues in an open and constructive manner. The hearings will be open to all Columbia University ID holders, and endeavor to address specific segments of the University community. Each hearing will be hosted by a major University leader.
Details of the hearings are as follows:

  • Monday, February 7, 2011 – Focused on the general University communityOpening remarks by Sharyn O’Halloran, Chair of the Senate Executive Committee 417 International Affairs Building (Altschul Auditorium), 8 PM – 10 PM
  • Tuesday, February 15, 2011 – Focused on the undergraduate populationOpening remarks by Michele M. Moody-Adams, Dean of Columbia College 309 Havemeyer Hall, 7:30 PM – 9:30 PM
  • Wednesday, February 23, 2011 – Focused on faculty and graduate studentsOpening remarks by Claude M. Steele, Provost and Dean of Faculties 417 International Affairs Building (Altschul Auditorium), 8 PM – 10 PM

Third, the Task Force will actively solicit opinions from the Columbia community. The TaskForce welcomes all submissions and has established the [email protected] e-mail address to collect feedback, statements, and other reactions from members of the Columbia community.

The Task Force will also distribute a poll to students of Columbia College, the undergraduate population of the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, the School ofGeneral Studies, Barnard College, and the School of International and Public Affairs, to record opinions about Columbia University’s engagement with the Armed Forces of the United States and the Reserve Officers Training Corps program.

“By polling all schools that have had any level of student participation in ROTC in the past five years, we have tried to make the poll both broad and representative,” said Ron Mazor, CC ’09,Law ’12, and Co-Chair of the Task Force. “At the same time, we hope that our open submission policy will ensure that everyone in our community who cares about the issue will be able to express their opinion and provide feedback.”

The Task Force will then submit a final report to the University Senate. The report will include a reflection of campus opinion and a comprehensive record of the debates, discussions, and reactions to the Task Force’s events. The report will be published and made publicly available prior to the University Senate meeting of March 4, 2011.

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5 Comments

  1. ROTC in NYC

    Despite having a population comparable to that of entire states, for example, the resources afforded to New York City for officer training and recruitment appear paltry when compared to its corollaries in other parts of the country. The city deserves better. Here are just a few reasons why:

    http://www.securenation.org/rotc-in-new-york-city-an-untapped-resource/

  2. GRADE LEAK!!!!

    AHHH WHAT IS THIS?

  3. What?  

    We're planning to engage the military? I've seen the fitness of most columbia students; this ends poorly for us.

    • it's called PT

      If you aren't fit when you join ROTC, you will be when you graduate. PT, short for physical training, is a part of the ROTC curriculum. Leaders of soldiers are expected to be intellectually, physically, and morally fit. That's what ROTC trains you to be.

      • Joke Explanation  

        It's a joke on the title of "engaging military" title," as if I misunderstood it to mean that Columbia were planning to enter a fight with the military. Now that the ROTC members will be even more fit, this makes it more frightening.

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