Feb

28

GS Student Had Seizure In Barnard Hall, Arrested By NYPD

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The original Facebook post.

Around 4 pm on Tuesday, February 27, NYPD arrested GS student Shlomo Fingerer in Barnard Hall. Later that evening, a photo was posted to the Barnard Class of 2021 Facebook page, asking about the reason behind the arrest. A student commented that the man being arrested in the photo was a friend of theirs who suffers from a medical condition; they speculated that the reason Shlomo refused to get into an ambulance was because he,“loses awareness of where he is and can’t control his actions.” The post has since been removed from the page at the request of the student who commented. Also, a different commenter noted that Barnard students were not notified of the police presence on campus, as is usual protocol in such situations.

On Wednesday, Fingerer posted on Facebook explaining his condition: “Seizures make me sleepwalk. I am totally unconscious and unresponsive. I look like someone in a total daze.” While studying in Lefrak, he wrote, he experienced a seizure. Later he awoke to find himself under arrest. It appears, he continues, that he went to Hewitt Dining Hall and was asked to leave but did not respond. Public Safety and the NYPD were called (unknown by whom) and Fingerer was removed from Hewitt. He was then arrested for trespassing, and NYPD transported Fingerer to a holding cell off campus.

According to Fingerer’s Facebook post, the head chef at Hewitt, Frank Pulgiano, claimed that he felt threatened because of the way Fingerer was clenching his fork; he allegedly refused to put it down, and it had to be physically removed from his hand.

Fingerer says in his Facebook post that he was told he can no longer step foot on Barnard’s campus, despite being a Columbia student and paying “$1,500 for a class in Barnard this semester.” If he does, he will be charged with trespassing, issued a $1,000 fine, and possibly sentenced to one year in prison. In his post, Fingerer writes, “Any seizure that I have, and I have two a week, I can sleepwalk onto Barnard campus, which is right across the street.” Additionally, because he keeps kosher and Hewitt is one of the few dining halls with kosher options, Fingerer claims that not being allowed on Barnard’s campus severely restricts his dining options.

In an update to his post, Fingerer added that he may now be facing homelessness because of his arrest. According to Columbia Facilities, they have received complaints from students and parents who feel unsafe with him in his building.

Barnard has since released a statement saying, “With the utmost concern for the safety of our community, on Tuesday evening, Aramark staff and Public Safety responded to a university student who was exhibiting threatening behavior and they called NYPD. Subsequently the student informed us his behavior was a result of a medical condition. Barnard will always work with members of our community who have medical needs. The College will never take legal action or ban a student from our facilities solely because of a medical condition.”

A number of students have begun an email campaign targeting Barnard employees who deal with disabilities and discipline. These faculty members range from Barnard Human Resources to a Title IX representative to the Barnard representative for Aramark to President Beilock.

Edit, 2/28/18, 10 pm: The title of the post has been changed from “GS Student Arrested In Barnard Hall Yesterday” to “GS Student Had Seizure In Barnard Hall, Arrested By NYPD,” in order to better reflect the events described by the contents of the post.

Edit, 2/28/18, 10:45 pm: Members of the Barnard community received an email from Dean Hinkson at 10:41 pm on 2/28/2018 regarding the incident described above. In the email, she referenced action being taken by “Columbia counterparts” and indicated that Barnard “will work with them to ensure the student’s well-being.” She also noted that Barnard is not pursuing legal action against Fingerer, that they “are working with Aramark to see that the charge that was filed against the student is dropped,” and that he is not banned from campus or Hewitt Dining Hall.

In accordance with many of the demands being made by students earlier in the day for next steps, the email also stated that Barnard is “looking at how we can collaborate more closely with Columbia’s Office of Disability Services” and “reviewing our response to this incident to ensure it comported with our values, as well as our policies and procedures.”

The full text of the email can be read below.

Dear Members of the Barnard Community,

I am writing to inform you about an incident on campus that has generated some attention. On Tuesday evening, a Columbia student entered Hewitt Dining Hall during non-operating hours and exhibited behavior that made an Aramark employee feel threatened and unsafe. Aramark contacted Barnard Public Safety, who tried unsuccessfully to persuade the student to leave, evaluated the situation and contacted the NYPD. Upon their arrival, the NYPD made the decision to arrest the student.

Since that time, the student has indicated via email and social media that his behavior at the scene, which he does not remember, was a result of having recently suffered an epileptic seizure. Those responding to the incident were not aware of the student’s medical condition. We have spoken with our Columbia counterparts and will work with them to ensure the student’s well-being. We have reached out to the student and are not pursuing legal action. The student is not banned from the Barnard College campus nor restricted from Hewitt Dining Hall. To be clear, the College will never take legal action or ban a student from our facilities solely because of a medical condition.

We are committed to the safety of our community, as well as to the well-being of all our students. We are working with Aramark to see that the charge that was filed against the student is dropped. In addition, we are looking at how we can collaborate more closely with Columbia’s Office of Disability Services to ensure that critical information is shared in a manner that is timely and effective. Finally, we are reviewing our response to this incident to ensure it comported with our values, as well as our policies and procedures. Our goal is to make sure we have the best possible response to any circumstance involving campus safety and student well-being.

Sincerely,

Avis Hinkson

Edit 3/1/2018: In response to the email from Hinkson, Fingerer reiterated that in the past, “Barnard public safety had responded and responded to my seizures, where we had lengthy talks afterwards.” He also noted that he had previously by police in handcuffs from the third floor of Mudd to the emergency room. He shared that he had been in contact with a representative from Aramark, who was interested in meeting with him and discussing what had happened.

Photo via Bwog Staff

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21 Comments

  1. Anonymous

    I don't feel safe around Aramark and CU facilities employees. And yet, CU has taken no steps to remove them from campus...

    • Anonymous

      Can you explain what makes you feel unsafe around Aramark and CU facilities employees? I have not dealt with any Aramark employees but I have dealt with CU facilities employees and have only been treated with the utmost respect. I am interested in learning about other people's experiences that I might be oblivious too and not looking to undermine your statements.

    • Anonymous  

      The employees are not the issue. The issue is racist white admin who love the NYPD, not POC employees who are just doing their jobs.

      • Anonymous

        The employees called the cops not the administration. And your anti white racism is very ugly.

        • Anonymous  

          Racism involves institutional oppression and white people are not institutionally oppressed so there is literally no such thing as racism against white people. Read the dictionary before you write a comment. But nice try! :)

          • Phoebe

            I'm not white and I find your kind of anti white doublespeak argument a disservice to we minority students because you inject race where it doesn't belong.

            There are times when we need to address racism but always calling everything racism destroys all options for advancement.

  2. lolwut

    Can we get an explanation for why they even needed (what seems like) 6 armed cops to arrest one student?

  3. Anonymous

    I think Barnard went a little overboard on this GS/JTS student with a medical condition, especially after all the articles they have printed on threating people with disabilities with respect.

  4. Checkyoself

    Click bait title is damaging. Esp. dealing with a student with a medical condition. Bwog come on

  5. Anonymous

    Clearly Public Safety did not handle this issue well. I would like to know what training on recognizing disabilities they receive. I know there is an emergency EMT cohort at CU, so... Could calling them have been an alternative? Also, similar to the Sexual Respect/Awareness training during orientation, CU could educate students on bystander intervention for situations like this. I wonder if anybody was present when he had a seizure and if they were equipped with response techniques.

  6. Anonymous  

    I’ve never heard of epilepsy where people can keep functioning during seizures? Even “absence seizures” people usually freeze up. He may have been having an episode from a mental illness in which case police being called is so common. Not any better, but common. (I wondered if him and his family said epilepsy to make it a physical and not mental disorder).
    But I think it really changes the story if a person is moving around averagely but being non-responsive versus having a seizure.

    But yes, still fuck Aramark admin

  7. Anonymous

    "Arrest and Seizure"

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