Dec

30

Senior Wisdom: Savannah Fletcher

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Savannah

Savannah

Sooo we messed up—in going through emails, Bwog found a Senior Wisdom we’d forgotten to post along with the rest.  Huge apologies to Savannah for the delay on this, but trust us, this is a gem of a Senior Wisdom and well worth the wait.

Name, Hometown, School: Savannah Fletcher; I hail from an island north of Seattle, in the small town of Freeland, on Mutiny Bay; Columbia College

Claim to fame? I’m not claiming fame, but I’ve played on Columbia’s Volleyball team all four years, was Editor-in-Chief of Now!Here: Columbia’s Journal of Travel, and if you’ve seen a tall girl slowly crutching around campus this fallprobably was me.

Where are you going? To the balmy coast of Antarctica, but only for a few weeks, then returning to my beloved Pacific Northwest.

Three things you learned at Columbia:

  1. That anything can be spun into a positive. Too often we surround ourselves with negativity and complaints—it’s exhausting and sadly becomes a knee-jerk response. People may feel the need to vent and express their frustrations, which is a healthy release, but why is it the social norm to bond over “disgusting” dining hall food or mutual hatred for a class? Let’s create a culture in which it’s not only acceptable, but encouraged to be uber enthusiastic about that amazing Romantic Poetry lecture (Erik Gray is wonderful) or the fact that you slept for over 8 hours last night. Now that’s something I want to hear about.
  2. Stress is not a necessary part of your college education. It does nothing to better your performance or your happiness. When life seems to be bombarding you with responsibilities and tight deadlines, relax, accept the fact that life is overwhelming at the moment, then get down to business and do the amazing things we’re all capable of. Also, make sleep and exercise a priority. Your stress level and overall quality of life will drastically improve.
  3. It takes great strength to be vulnerable. Sadly it’s taken tearing 5 ligaments in my knee to embrace this fact, but secretly carrying our burdens while keeping a strong face merely adds to our struggles. It breaks my heart when I ask someone how they’re doing and they respond with “terrible” and laugh. There’s no need to smother our true feelings in sarcasm and flippancy. It’s ok to be sad, to be struggling, and to ask for help. Whether it’s getting me Chipotle when I couldn’t walk, helping move across campus, or simply coming over to watch some Archer and keep me company, friends have always come through in the tough times. But I have yet to find a telepathic friend. You have to ask.
  4. Let your freak flag fly. Be sincerely, unapologetically you.

Back in my day… We had landline phones in our dorms, Card-O-Mat was my go-to place for buying cards, and subway fares were only $2.25.

Justify your existence in 30 words or fewer: I’m a grown woman. I can do whatever I want.

Write a CU Admirers post to anyone or anything at Columbia: To my suite mates this year: you all have been so generous and kind, especially since injuring myself. From carrying a cup of water to my room because my hands are full with crutches, to picking up groceries for me, you’ve taught me it’s ok to ask for help.

To the security guards and facilities workers on campus: You work incredibly long hours at tough jobs, yet still manage to say hello and offer assistance in any way you can. I admire your strength.

To the door-holders, the “can I get that for you?”-sayers: Thank you for helping with the little things. We all have tough days and your small favors for a stranger, or the kind words to that girl you only somewhat know, they really make the difference.

Would you rather give up oral sex or cheese? I think this ceased to be a hypothetical question after I gave up cheese a year ago.

One thing to do before graduating:

Go out and have your New York experience. There are an infinite number of amazing opportunities in New York, but living the city life does not mean doing them all, it means doing what excites you. Do not fear missing out on “classic” city activities so long as you’re enjoying what you do have time for. With that in mind, here are some essentials for a Columbia experience:

  1. Get on a roof on campus. Mudd has been a personal favorite, but find any somewhat secret spot on campus and make it your own.
  2. Go to a Columbia athletic competition! I’d recommend a volleyball game, but I’m somewhat biased.
  3. Eat an entire slice of Koronet’s late at night (or 2. It happens.)

Any regrets? Not saying hello to people I vaguely recognize/had in my Frontiers Class/met that one night months ago out of some fear they did not remember me. Odds are if I had simply said hello they would have done the same (heck, even if they didn’t remember me.)

Not going to enough of my friends’ extracurricular events. It meant the world to me every time a friend came to watch my volleyball game, even if they had absolutely no clue what was going on. Return the favor and go to their art show, listen to the speaker they brought to campus, eat the free food at their club event. Not only are you supporting your friends, it usually ends up being a great time. Supporting those you care about means more than simply clicking “Join” on their Facebook event. Be true to your word and follow through.

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10 Comments

  1. Arsene Wenger /positivity/ edition

    POSITIVITY AMIRITE?

  2. Anonymous

    always be positive

    but be unapologetically you

    unless you arent positive?

  3. relevant question

    do tall girls date guys shorter than them?

  4. cumslut69

    Most Savannah responses ever. You da best and you will be missed!!!

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