Nov

25

Bwog Asked, “Are You Happy?”

Written by

17623311

Tonight, Bwog bumped around Butler, asking one question: “Are you happy?” Here is what you said.

  • A guy walking into 209: “Yes, because I think I’m in the right place, doing the right thing.”
  • A man on the second floor: “Moderately. [shrugs] That’s kind of an awkward question to ask in a library.”
  • One of your friendly neighborhood Butler smokers: “You know, man, what you’re gonna get is, you’re gonna get people who are upset at how they did on their last midterm, and they’ll say they’re sad right now…and then boom: people at Columbia are depressed. Bwog.”
  • His companion: “No. Actually… what is happiness?”
  • Reading a Bible in 403: “Am I happy? [giggle] Yeah.”
  • A girl wearing a football jersey at a table of drunk people in 210: “Yes, because we just had margaritas!”
  • Good looking blonde staring at herself in the second floor bathroom mirror: “Yes. I’m leaving this place.”
  • An Asian girl in Butler cafe: “Yes. I came here from China to study and join a different culture, and I live with my boyfriend. So I think I’m happy.”
  • White guy in Butler Cafe wearing sweatshirt/jeans/baseball cap: “I’m a Columbia student writing a paper in Butler on a Sunday night. What’s not to love?”
  • Girl in the stacks: “Yes! I was looking for a novel and I just found it!”
  • A jock-type in 209 with fake nerd glasses: “Yeah, because life is good.”
  • Guy in the Reference Room: “No.”
  • Female on Facebook in a sixth floor room: “Saw my family this weekend. Finished my CC paper at a godly hour. My ex’s new girlfriend is uglier than me. I guess life is pretty good.”
  • Chilled out guy in the Reference Room wearing Beats headphones, earnestly: “Yeah, man. Sure!”
  • Girl sobbing in the sixth floor hallway: [no answer]  (ed. note: Bwog is sorry! We didn’t notice!)

Uncertain person holding a flower via Shutterstock

Tags: , , , , , ,

40 Comments

  1. bwog is racist again

    Why include race or other stereotypes ("jock-like") in this at all? I don't understand how telling us that a girl is Asian at all affects us understanding the happiness of having a boyfriend you love or the joy of experiencing new things

    • The Gentleman's Harvest  

      I think it's very relevant in that particular instance - in a positive light even. Here is someone from a different country that has come to the United States to experience a culture very different from her own. Beyond the fact that she feels as if she has gained cultural insight, she also found love. As far as if it's racist for Bwog to say that she's Asian, it's descriptive. Get over it. The only other time that they point out race is when they say that someone was a White guy, but why does it matter that they included that? Perhaps Bwog shouldn't include gender or any descriptive qualities. Any mention of gender is sexist and by mentioning that the guy was wearing Beats headphones they might be inciting class based discrimination because of their price. In light of your brilliant critique, I think the new post should read as such:

      "Human A said..." But wait, that is a little too anthropocentric, plus we wouldn't want anyone to think that just because we labeled that person Human "A" that that individual was anymore special. How do you suggest Bwog write this post? Do you have any constructive point, or are you here simply to complain? My guess is the latter. I'm Hispanic and would personally have no problem if I had been asked this question and was then quoted as a young, Hispanic, male because that's what I am. It's as simple as that.

      • cringe  

        No, it's really not quite as simple as that. First, I don't think you can assume that a student is foreign just because they look Asian. You'd have to deduce that information from their actual response, not their physical appearance.

        Nor can you tell the difference between a South Asian and Hispanic sometimes, or the difference between a Hawaian and South Korean.

        I personally don't see anything particularly sexist about associating responses with sex. But beyond all this, why classify these people at all? Why the need to shift the focus off the center of the study, i.e. are people in Butler library happy?

    • lol  

      Why stereotype anything? Why not just write the entire article with no witty descriptions? Stop being so sensitive, ya crazy

    • Anonymous  

      OP's right - let's talk about something non-offensive like spoons. That will really make for a compelling story! On that note, I saw an Asian girl with a spoon this evening. Wait, damn it...

  2. Alum

    I liked this post a lot.

    And yea, I'm happy too.

    Thanks, Bwog.

  3. prime example...  

    ... of why sarcasm font is necessary: "'White guy in Butler Cafe wearing sweatshirt/jeans/baseball cap: “I’m a Columbia student writing a paper in Butler on a Sunday night. What’s not to love?”'

  4. Anonymous

    This is why I can't take Bwog seriously anymore. I mean really, you're going to try to argue that there are happy people at Columbia? What kind of journalistic integrity is that?

  5. Anonymous

    Glad this is up. But next time ask "Why are you happy?"

  6. Harmony Hunter  

    I won't be happy until somebody can give me directions to Harmony Hall.

  7. Anonymous  

    will chasing financial stability by selling myself into the corporate world make me happy? won't i be happier living with my family in a small home in a small town? do i need to make it big? is happiness defined for me by our never-stopping-never-settling-city-dwelling or can i still diverge from the expectations that keep pushing me into a mold i never signed up for.
    #thefutureisfrightening.

  8. Anonymous

    No lie, I once saw a sobbing girl run to the stairwell in Butler, I guess to cry in peace. When she opened the door I heard another girl crying and tell "this one's taken!"

  9. Concerned Female

    As someone who has experienced sexual violence, I do not appreciate the way this article advances rape culture.

    • Anonymous  

      You are so brave. Down with these rap enablers, creating mo' problems for us. Stop rap now!

    • I'm critical  

      your sarcasm and trivialization of the criticism of rape culture is tremendously problematic and unethical.

    • Concerned Male  

      Are you sure you're responding to the right article? And if those post was deliberate, then please ma'am, get some business... There is nothing objectionable here. I know it's great to sanctimoniously and self-righteously denigrate evil-doers for their iniquity but you trivialize exactly what you hope to draw attention to. Yes, you are actually belittling the agenda you wish to promote. I for one feel offended that *you feel offended* in such a grossly inappropriate, irrelevant context - I have a personal stake in prevention of sexual crimes because I too am a victim. Yes, women aren't the only victims. I was 5 and my aggressor was a female. But, that said, I really do not appreciate you giving people more reason to mock us as raving, self-pitying sob-stories who use every opportunity to victimize themselves to seek attention. Don't cheapen my cause.

  10. Since Bwog decided to point out the race of the interviewees  

    So no Black or Hispanic people were asked if they're happy?

  11. since you asked  

    definitively not happy. but my sadness has only peripherally, if that, to do with my work load. in fact, i'm in the library only when I'm in the right frame of mind to study. i can't remember the last time i didn't feel this stress, the last time i could go to the library and learn things. i wish i could be focused on my senior year the way i should be.

  12. CC 13

    Sorry to burst your bubble but barnard students would not "kill" to be in your shoes.

  13. Anonymous  

    I just peed in a water bottle. Happiness? I'll drink to that!

  14. SEAS'13  

    Happy? Hahahahahahahahahahahahahaha
    Talk to me once it's over.

  15. you don't get it  

    the point of Bwog is not to give note worthy news or to have journalistic integrity. Go to the BBC for that. Appreciate Bwog for what it is.

© 2006-2015 Blue and White Publishing Inc.