Jul

2

Insomnia Cookies Replaces P&W

Written by

Insomnia's new storefront

The storefront formerly occupied by P&W Sandwich Shop—which closed in December 2011 on account of “lease termination”—has a new tenant. That would be Insomnia Cookies, a business which delivers cookies to your dorm until 3 a.m. and can evidently afford the new lease.

Insomnia's new storefront

Insomnia’s new storefront, next to the Hungarian

So, Bwog views this development with mixed feels. On the one hand, it’s good that there’s something there rather than nothing. And Insomnia Cookies are supposed to be pretty darn good.

On the other hand, we miss Wendy (the “W” in “P&W”; the “P” being her husband, Panagiotis). She’d talk to ya as a human while she took your sandwich order; and don’t we already have enough ways to order food from strangers over the Internet? And, staying on that other hand, Insomnia marks yet another local place replaced by a chain. (And not one of those less disagreeable chains that only has one or two other locations in NYC—Insomnia has one in Florida, of all places.)

One last thing on that other hand: according to NYU Local, at their’s “[m]any [students] have had orders cancelled and were only informed about the cancellation after hours of waiting.”

One big question is: will they take e-forms?

Tags: , , , , ,

28 Comments

  1. okay, yeah, it's a chain, but

    COOKIES.

  2. i'm crying pre-diabetic tears of joy

  3. Right next to Hungarian?

    Might as well go to Hungarian. Unless you have a seriously specific craving.

  4. what the hell bwog  

    WHY CAN'T YOU JUST BE HAPPY ABOUT COOKIES GODDAMNIT

    • Anonymous

      Because perhaps some people don't want this neighborhood to become more of a glorified strip mall than it already is. Why the hell do people want to come to school "in the city of New York" and then give their money to the same stores that they had back in Peoria?

    • Anonymous  

      And because you're putting out a local business that improves local economy and local community so that a big business can have marginally better profits. Buying from "mom and pop" does a lot more than make your community look unique or make you feel hipster and snarky.

  5. san serifs

    did Hungarian get new signage?

  6. Anonymous

    Talk to you "as a human." What the fuck ambiguous DFW-wanna-be statement is this? Inarticulateness =/= artistic or literary.

    Also, just because something is a chain doesn't mean that it is worse or unoriginal. If the product is bad, then the product is bad. But just because you're little dream image of Morningside isn't as chic unique as your thrift store blazer or flea market bicycle doesn't mean that you should impose your adolescent craving for individuality on the rest of us.

    • I think that

      wanting to live in a neighborhood with locally-owned, independent small businesses does not constitute an "adolescent craving for individuality." It's also not pretentious, snobbish, hipster, or anything else like that-- quite the opposite. New York City is made up of neighborhoods which, at their best, are actual communities held together by the fabric of shared local institutions. Hungarian Pastry Shop, Symposium, and other long-time local businesses help make Morningside Heights what it is. The two Starbucks stores on Broadway do not. A neighborhood (or a city) which is made up primarily of large chain stores lacks identity and character--it becomes monotonous and forgettable. This kind of local character is the reason why many New Yorkers (and the real estate market) recognize that neighborhoods like the East Village or Williamsburg are cool and attractive places to live-- because they have a strong and unique identity. The proliferation of chain stores makes New York neighborhoods less distinct, and more like everywhere else. Just my two cents.

      • Anonymous

        and yet the line to chipotle is always out the door.

      • GS20??

        while i love everything you said, neither Williamsburg or the East Village has a "unique" vibe anymore. before the yuppies moved in, back in the 90s/early 2000s (when i was growing up and in high school, respectively) these neighborhoods had more of a flavor. they're now guiliani-fied, gentified, hipster havens. the only neighborhoods that retain some of their originality, at least in manhattan, are the upper east and west sides, because the residents are too rich and old to let their buildings get taken over by chains, and even those are becoming more chain-filled. just my two cents, as a native NYer in the community.

  7. lazy college senior

    Fuck you. I'm sorry that a chain that happens to have a branch in Florida (gasp! A "southern" state? God forbid! I bet they hate gays and freedom down there!) offends your small town Illinois sentiments. But when it comes to adding a FUCKING LATE NIGHT COOKIE DELIVERY STORE to the morningside region and you bitch about it for the sake of having nothing else to bitch about over your summer, you just suck. Insomnia cookies forever, Conor Skelding.

  8. Death to capitalism  

    Letting the storefront stay vacant for 18+ months instead of doing anything productive with it? What a joke.

  9. JJ

    Great call on the blow to SDT, Bwog.

  10. Anonymous

    Delivering cookies 24/7 is a great idea. But they have to be fast, dependable, and reliable.

  11. Harmony alum

    I just moved out of Harmony and they opened a cookie shop??!

  12. 1020-ite

    1020 has just become so much better by having this right by.

  13. FUCK THE LIBERAL MINORITY MAJORITY

    So glad I already graduated from this hot-bed of annoying liberals against anything mainstream for no better reason than the fact that it's mainstream and not mom-n-pop. I hate you all.

  14. fuck

    yeah. its about god damn time that there was an insomnia that delivered to CU. the fact that there is one on 80-something that DOESNT deliver here, to a college campus teeming with unhealthy, sleep-deprived souls seemed like the stupidest business decision since i don't even know when

© 2006-2015 Blue and White Publishing Inc.