May

13

List Of Names Of Alleged Rapists Written On Bathroom Walls

Written by

Not here, not anywhere

*UPDATE 8:38pm* See an editorial statement from Bwog’s board posted tonight at 8:25pm.

*UPDATE 3:38pm* Bwog would like to note that the following does not represent the opinion of the staff or the editorial board as a whole. We have removed the 2:47 update addressing the use of the word “legitimate” because, again, the piece only reflects the opinions of its authors and not of Bwog itself. We do apologize for failing to make this distinction clear when the piece was posted.

In addition, we were tipped that there are “rape list flyers” in Lerner and Butler bathrooms.

Over the past week, three pictures of a list of people who have allegedly violated the sexual assault policy have been tipped to campus media. The first list, written May 7 in a women’s stall in Hamilton, had each name in a different hand-writing and pen color, suggesting that it was written by multiple contributors, but a thorough check through all of the bathrooms in the building showed it was gone within hours. The second, written yesterday in a women’s stall in Lerner, is clearly all written in the same handwriting, as is the third, seen in Butler late last night. We have seen Facilities working diligently with the administration to take them down immediately.

On May 7, after receiving the first list, Bwog was in communication with senior administrators, who told us that publishing the list would violate Title IX as well as FERPA. That, and the desire to be responsible and not start a witch hunt, are the reasons that the uncensored list will never be published by the media. In addition, perhaps writing this list (and publishing the work of a campus “vigilante”)  is not the best way to create a safer campus environment for victims.

We strongly encourage the prosecution through Columbia or the legal system of sexual assault perpetrators and taking all appropriate actions to “cultivate a community that is hostile to perpetrators of sexual violence,” and we acknowledge the bravery of victims and faculty to help force change from the administration by sharing their stories. We are incredibly disturbed that people think this is a legitimate way to deal with the issue.

*Update 10:48 am:* Bwog has gotten tips, and seen for ourselves, a fourth list, written in huge letters in a women’s stall on the second floor of Butler. Public safety has taped up the door, but the bathroom is still open as of 5 minutes ago. Public safety is also taping up the women’s bathroom on the fourth floor.

A very similar incident occurred at Brown in 1990. Brown’s administration was eventually forced to respond to lists of alleged rapists scrawled on bathroom walls.

Tags: , , ,

219 Comments

  1. Whoever did this  

    Is out of their damn mind

    • Yeah maybe  

      Maybe they're out of their damn minds because their institution has done nothing to protect themselves and others from sexual assault on campus

      • class of 2017  

        It doesn't matter what the administration is or isn't doing -- writing a list of people under investigation will only bias any investigation and possibly throw innocent people under the bus. Remember, regardless of the accusations, they are still **people**, and they are innocent until proven guilty.

        Whoever keeps writing these and tipping them to Bwog should be ashamed of themselves for trying to "prove" the accused rapists' guilt in a trial by popular opinion / media. I'm embarrassed to attend the same school as them. I thought we were better than this bullshit, but apparently not.

        • Grammar Nazi Ivy League edition

          *to attend the same school as they

        • eyeroll

          right, because god forbid anything should come out of this that would be aimed at ACTUALLY protecting women from being raped. You know, like the university doesn't expel a serial rapist and now none of us are allowed to say hey, stay away from Rapey McRaper Pants, he's a rapist. That would make us crazy, wanting to protect other women.

          • Bullneck

            Protip: When the people who are appointed/in a position to/supposed to protect you and abdicate that responsibility, those compromised will seek other alternatives.

            Not too keen on sending my daughter to Columbia at the moment.

      • stfu  

        Bahr's article raised some serious concerns over the process. Since then, the administration has done more work on fixing (not merely addressing) its sexual assault policies -- policies which were already bolstered by law enforcement and have no business being conducted by campus officials anyway -- than it has for ANY OTHER ISSUE IN A DECADE.

        Maybe, just maybe, the unprecedented shrillness over sexual assault reform comes from uberprivileged white girls who are dealing with their first minor injustice. Or am I missing the bathroom list of people who Columbia forced to move out of Manhattanville?

      • Anonymous  

        Those who want the administration to "do something" should be careful what they wish for. The sexual liberation of the 1960s represents dramatic progress that should not be rolled back. On campus, this means that it is no longer considered administrators' business to police students' sexual lives. Do we want to return to the days when it was?

        The options before the administration now include:
        *Adding additional layers of bureaucracy
        *Further restricting alcohol consumption by students
        *Curfews or restrictions on visits between dormitories

        Personally, I would rather women were empowered by some other means. I suspect that, on reflection, many would agree.

    • Some thoughts  

      1) Dave Chappelle once said that the worst thing you can call someone is crazy, because it's dismissive - and that's something I think about a lot. There's a lot of rash behavior that we're quick to chalk up to someone being "crazy" or "out of their mind", and while I'm aware that people don't always mean that literally, I nonetheless agree that that kind of language often keeps us from looking at reactive behavior critically, instead of dismissing it. Those of us who aren't already should be asking, "What would lead a person to do this in their right mind?"

      2) Someone earlier said that this is "the same as writing on a wall that so and so is a witch lets burn him". I think an important to remember where that expression comes from. When we talk about witch hunts, we talk about mass vigilantism against a poorly understood and often nonexistent threat; we talk about a kind of mass panic that is, above all else, uninformed - it's paranoia. But a lot of these women aren't paranoid; the threat is real & they know it. They just often go unheard - or, when heard, unaided.

      3) How does vandalism in any way invalidate the issue here? Violence is violence, but if someone feels they must resort to vandalism to make specific instances of violence known, does that somehow make the violence less serious? You don't have to condone the vandalism here, but if your support for the anti-SA campaigning is contingent upon that, then I think you need to sort out your priorities.

      4) Yeah, fine okay, whatever, false accusations are a thing: but if I concede that, will you stop using the absurdly unlikely possibility of a false accusation as a way of silencing the /real/ accusations that occur with overwhelmingly greater frequency?

      Look, in case I haven't made it clear, I absolutely do not "approve" the list-writer's actions: my major issue with this is that it creates more work for facilities than it does for administration. But still, when I see something like this, I think it's pretty clear that the primary goal here isn't frontier justice: it's a warning for the women who may at some point come into contact with these guys. Think about it - these lists weren't put in Low, they weren't scrawled in sidewalk chalk across College Walk, they were put in women's bathrooms.

      • Anonymous

        Your use of Dave Chappelle as a moral paragon was really convincing. As much as I love to derive my ethical Weltanschauung from the words of a comedian, Let's stick with the facts here.

        Statistics regarding rape and sexual assault are gathered by a variety of agencies. The National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) is the gold standard for crime reporting which gathers comprehensive statistics on crimes ranging from auto theft to burglary.

        It uses sound scientific statistical methods, and places the victimization rate of rape (including many forms of sexual assault) at 0.02% of women and 0.01% of men in 2010.

        The statistics you cite use a definition of rape that includes not only unwanted touching, but any circumstance in which a person consumed alcohol, had consensual sex, and later regretted it.

        To quote Harvard Professor of Psychology, and Chair of the Harvard Psychology Department Dr. Steven Pinker:

        “Junk statistics from advocacy groups are slung around and become common knowledge, such as the incredible factoid that one in four university students has been raped. (The claim was based on a commodious definition of rape that the alleged victims themselves never accepted; it included, for example, any incident in which a woman consented to sex after having had too much to drink and regretted it afterward.”

        Certainly I trust Dr. Pinker’s expert informed opinion, and United States Department of Justice statistics over the opinion of Dave Chapelle. Surely if you included everyone that ever regretted having sex after a night out, the figure would approach 100%.

        • Big Tom

          Nice job girls ... that's how you make the 11% conviction rate for rape 0.5%

          • Slow your roll

            I'm the first person to call to attention the flawed statistics involved in those studies. But just because 0.02% of women experience rape does not mean an 11% conviction rape is excessive. Could be 11% is either too high or too low, the 0.02% statistic has nothing to do with convictions. So to assess whether the crime of rape is over or under deterred you need to look to something else. Also as to the definitional matter of rape why are we giving any credence to social scientists? This is a legal matter and instead of reading some gender studies textbook I encourage you to read the New York Penal Law or the statute for any given State you may find yourself in. You'll find that the standard of proof has been relaxed over the past decades and has facilitated convictions that would have been unheard of even a few decades ago despite the fact that rape is by no means a new phenomena. Also lest anyone misunderstand me, when I speak of standards of proof being relaxed I'm specifically referring to the Actus Reus being decreased combined with the courts resistance to mistake of fact defenses. This is all to say complaining about the protocol for institutional review at your Ivy league college seems rather petty when the legal body that adjudicates the vast majority of rape allegations has done such a commendable job of modernizing its standards.

    • Anonymous

      they should face real consequences. the accused should sue for defamation of character, and the vandals should be expelled and/or lose their degrees.

    • Most sensible person here

      No one seems to be getting justice here.

      New policy:

      Let the Gods decide. Trial by combat!

    • moral panic

      There is no such thing as a "rape epidemic" or "rape culture." It is a type of moral panic.[0]

      Other examples of recent moral panics include:
      The false preschool sexual assault case in New Jersey a few years ago that led to innocent teachers being incarcerated for years.
      The gross exaggeration of the use of date rape drugs in the 1990s.
      The First and Second Red Scares.
      And the Salem Witch Trials. [id].

      You are making two extraordinary claims: first, that one in four women are raped, and second, that these crimes are ignored as a matter of course.

      Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence, and unfortunately for you, and the various departments that have furthered this idea, the evidence simply does not exist.

      [0]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

      The hallmarks of a moral panic are fivefold:

      1. Concern about a particular group that is likely to have a negative effect on society.

      2. Hostility towards the group in question increases, and they become "folk devils".

      3. Widespread acceptance that the group in question poses a very real threat to society. It is important at this stage that the "moral entrepreneurs" are vocal and the "folk devils" appear weak and disorganised.

      4. Disproportionate action is taken to the actual threat posed by the accused group.

      5. Moral panics are highly volatile and tend to disappear as quickly as they appeared due to a wane in public interest or news reports changing to another topic.

      All five are present in this current debate.

    • Defend the innocent

      For anyone who doubts that this "rape culture" stuff is just part of a larger national war against men, I highly recommend checking out the reddit page entitled "Facts and statistics detailing male oppression.

      The link is here:

      http://www.reddit.com/r/MensRights/comments/uwekw/facts_and_statistics_detailing_male_oppression/

    • To all those victimized by women

      Here are the facts:

      1) The BOGUS "1 in 4 females being rape statistic" has been debunked for years. The study that delusional feminazi's use for this claim was the one done by Mary Koss in 1985 which she even admits was faulted by her use of extremely wide rape definitions where things like "regretting it later" counted as rape. The best studies we have come from the data collected by the FBI and show that the real prevalence is 52 per 100,000 which is less than .1%.

      Source : http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cj...

      Source: http://usatoday30.usatoday.com...

      2) More men are raped in prison alone each year than the total number of women who are raped. Look up the stats. Over 100,000-200,000 male inmates / year. Rape is a crime that affects men much more than it does women. Men are the primary victims.

      Source: http://www.nybooks.com/article...

      Source:

      Sexual Victimization in Prisons and Jails Reported by Inmates, 2011–12: National Inmate Survey, 2011–12

      3) Valid research shows about 41% of rape accusations are false. There is no "rape culture" but there is a false-rape-accusation culture. Here are all the studies showing about half of all rape claims (and I would include yours, unless you can offer compelling evidence that you didn't consent) are BS:

      Source: "False Rape Allegations" by Eugene Kanin, Archives of Sexual Behavior Feb 1994 v23 n1 p81 (12)

      • No  

        Both the DoJ and the White House estimate that 1 in 5 women in America are raped during their lifetimes and that 1 in 5 women who go to college are sexually assaulted while on campus.

        http://iaclea.org/visitors/about/documents/WhiteHouseCouncil_sexual_assault_report_1-21-14.pdf

        Your FBI Link doesn't actually lead to any information, and they're *not* the best sources on this. Because sexual assault and rape are rarely reported, and people often don't self-identify as survivors on surveys.

        The 1/5 figure comes from comprehensive CDC surveys that are specifically designed to count unreported assaults. The research they use is widely considered the most reliable. Those are lifetime reports that don't include the fact that repeat assault is common.

        You may disagree with this specific action, but please don't use that as an excuse to throw out false statistics or deny that this is a serious problem on this campus and in this country. I don't support this action either, but don't use this as an excuse to deny that the movement to improve our ajudication process and resources for survivors.

        You want proof that Columbia hasn't responded to these cases appropriately? We have it in Anna Bahr's articles:

        https://bwog.com/2014/02/06/fallen-through-the-cracks-an-examination-of-sexual-assault-at-columbia-pt-2/

        http://bwog.com/2014/01/23/accessible-prompt-and-equitable-an-examination-of-sexual-assault-at-columbia/

      • '15  

        Prison rape is a very real and very serious issue that harms and dehumanizes men indescribably; I doubt many would disagree with you on that. That being said, sexual violence has just as awful an effect on women as it does on men. If you feel so strongly that the rape of men is an issue, shouldn't you feel just as strongly that women are being raped as well? Women are not the only victims of sexual violence by any means, but outside of prison and looking at adult cases, women do tend to be targeted more than men. Sexual violence is NEVER ok and a person of any gender can be a victim of it. Although I have no doubt there are a small number of people out there who take advantage of the system, it is highly irresponsible to insinuate that a woman (or man!) who reports rape or any kind of sexual assault should not be taken very, very seriously.

    • Big Tom

      Nice job girls ... that's how you make the 11% conviction rate for rape 0.5%

  2. Anonymous  

    maybe the reason bwog is so "disturbed" is because one of their own is named on this list?

    • Anonymous  

      i wouldn't be surprised, bwog has been pitifully wishy-washy about this whole thing. also LOL if bwog thinks that people don't have the right to know who might sexually assault them -- that's fucking dumb, bwog. if the list were published everyone would be safer.

      also as per usual this is terribly written lol

      • Anonymous  

        There are many things that would make the world safer that are also heinous and unacceptable. Deporting all blacks would make New York safer, so why do you not advocate it?

        • CC'14

          Columbia, I am DONE with you.

        • Nialah Edari  

          The fact that 21 people liked this post....

        • Anonymous  

          Yes, we understand. But the assertion that this would increase safety is itself heinous.

          • A bit more  

            'Heinous' doesn't even begin to describe what was said in that statement. The audacity that someone would consider this a sound argument is baffling, but what's implicit here is the attribution of crime & violence as a dispositional flaw in blacks. It's the same textbook racism that drew from taxonomy to describe race and certain associated traits as inherently biological rather than circumstantial.

            Blacks have historically been relegated to the bottom ranks of society. If we are even able to entertain this idea, to think that the deportation of blacks would not then be met by the subjugation of another disadvantaged identity is incredibly misguided. It wouldn't take long for society to ascribe to them the same associations formerly reserved for blacks. To get a glimpse of how inverting the social hierarchy can affect the structural realities of race, just watch Trading Places with Eddie Murphy. Now who's scared of who?

        • Ughh  

          And if you deported all white people, or all bankers, or whatever, the crime rate would drop too. All people commit crime--at different rates, sure, due to historical & socio-economic factors. But the fact that you chose to single out black people says something--maybe not so much about yourself but about the deeply racial society which we both inhabit.

        • lol  

          Deport them to where? Do you mean the land their parents or grandparents or great-grandparents or great-great grandparents resided in (aka *America*)?

          Or perhaps you mean the country from which their ancestors were forcibly taken 400 years ago. Many African Americans today do not know from which country in Africa their ancestors descended from. Their captors didn't exactly keep the best records. So good luck with that.

      • Wishy washy?  

        Bwog wishy washy about the sexual assault topic? No. They are responsible. Rather than making themselves liable for libel they risk maybe being "scooped" in order to maintain their integrity. Anna Bahr's article (which Bwog posted in affiliation with the Blue and a White) is what brought national exposure to sexual assault on campus.
        If you people honestly believe condemning someone as guilty before they are proven to be, then go live elsewhere.
        I hope that if the students on this list are guilty that Columbia handles the situation appropriately (dramatic eye-roll here, it know how unlikely this is), and that if any innocent person was named that the other campus publications are ready to issue them a very awkward apology.

    • Very strange  

      Bwog seems uncharacteristically shocked and appalled by this whole thing. They're "incredibly disturbed" by this, but not the inundation of misogyny or racism that accompanies other campus issues? Why would they not publish the blacked out list earlier, like every other news org did, if they think it's such a horrible thing? This post is really weird.

    • Sarah Faith  (Bwog Staff)  

      I assure you that we do not take sexual assault allegations lightly. Daniela Quintanilla's incredible piece in Spectrum (linked in the last paragraph) echoes my own position on the matter.

      • Sooo to clarify  

        Is what OP said why the post was delayed? There are no Title IX or FERPA issues associated with publishing a blacked out list (which is why Spec published it long ago), so that can't be the reason. Did you think this was so horrible that publicizing it would be worse than denying readers knowledge of an ongoing crime spree? What changed your decision calculus?

        • Sarah Faith  (Bwog Staff)  

          We don't consider one list with blurred out names to be news. Lists going viral is news. Also, I'm flattered that you think we are the only way for our readers to find out about things on campus, but there are many other news sources around.

          • Sarah, who are you kidding?  

            You really don't think someone writing alleged rapists names on a bathroom wall is news, when its clearly inspired by a similar incident that happened at Brown, which did go viral? The author who wrote this seems outraged that an potential act of vandalism/slander has occurred. The first two times this happened it wasn't news, but Bwog thinks cute squirrels and a fake image of a girl giving someone head in a library is?

            Your passive aggressive conclusion aside, I wonder if that's Bwog's new motto. "There are many other news sources around." That's the most pathetic defense a news org could give.

            And you still haven't denied what OP said.

    • Drunk Sex is not rape

      Let's examine the legal framework in New Jersey

      Sexual Assault is defined under NJSA 2C:14

      1. First, let's address the drunkenness question. If a man and woman go to the Street, return drunk, and have sex, does that constitute rape on the part of the man.

      Under New Jersey law, no.

      NJSA 2C:14(c) states in relevant part:

      "An actor is guilty of sexual assault if he commits an act of sexual penetration with another person under any one of the following circumstances:...
      (2) The victim is one whom the actor knew or should have known was physically helpless, mentally defective, or mentally incapacitated;"

      So the intoxication question hinges upon the definition of "mentally incapacitated", which is defined in NJSA 2C:14-1

      "Mentally Incapacitated" means that condition in which a person is rendered temporarily incapable of understanding or controlling his conduct due to the influence of a narcotic, anesthetic, intoxicant, or other substance administered to that person without his prior knowledge of consent, or due to any other act committed upon that person which rendered that person incapable of appraising or controlling his conduct."

      Mental incapacitation requires that the victim be intoxicated due to no fault of his or her own, such as being deliberately drugged by another party. That clearly doesn't apply in the case of two drunk students walking home together from Prospect Avenue, as both the man and the woman consented to drinking to intoxication.

      So unless someone is drugged without his or her knowledge, unconscious, or "physically helpless," he or she is capable of consent.

      2. What if one party consents but forgets the next morning?

      Again, the law here is pretty clear. The alleged perpetrator must be actually aware, or should have been aware given the circumstances, that he or she did not receive consent. See NJSA 2C:14.(a)7, which states "(7) The victim is one whom the actor knew or should have known was physically helpless, mentally defective or mentally incapacitated." The perpetrator must know at the time of the act that the complainant was unable to give consent, or else it is not an offense.

      The entire concept of "drunk people can't give consent" was invented by school administrators, not the legal system.

      Given the confusion, awkwardness, and miscommunication inherent in early sexual encounters, is this really an area where we want the deans at West College actively meddling in students' lives, meting out punishment for actions that anywhere else in the state beyond FitzRandolf Gate wouldn't constitute wrongdoing?

      • ok  

        so i'm not totally sure why you wrote all of new jersey's legal system because... um.. we're not in new jersey.

        Secondly, you're right in that the concept of "drunk people can't give consent" is a school-imposed policy. just like not smoking inside your room. That's not a law, but you've got to follow it in order to go here, right? You sign a little thing at the beginning of the year? Yeah?

        Good we cleared that up.

  3. dsa  

    it would be kinda funny if these people werent actual rapists and someone was just mad at them....

    • Dunno if funny is the right word  

      It is for THIS reason that these lists are absolutely, 100% unacceptable. Public shaming is controversial, one might even entertain an argument for publicly identifying *known* rapists (though I'm not sure I would). But, regardless, to give anyone the possibility to list someone they might not like and potentially ruin that person's life is unforgivable. This is not the solution to sexual assault issues on campus. Instead it's a platform to potentially destroy the lives of innocent Columbia students. Suppose there were 100 names listed and 99/100 were indeed rapists - the one innocent accused individual would have his/her life destroyed by these actions. Please stop writing these lists, Columbia students. You risk making an innocent fellow student's life enormously painful.

  4. UltimateTrash  

    They did this in Oberlin college and started a witch hunt. It turned out that one of the students they named was a freshman who had been on campus for a week. And they flashed his picture on signs that said "rapist". The group responsible finally admitted that they just picked random people from the freshman class to target, but the damage was done. Their justification for this: "If maybe one [innocent] guy gets his life ruined, it balances out".

    Stop the witchunts and report to the POLICE so that you can get the rapists in jail. Stop telling victims that the police won't help them/scaring them away from reporting crimes for the sake of a political agenda!

  5. asdsa  

    This is the point when people stop taking the issue of rape on campus seriously. Defacing school property with names that may or may not be actual rapists is the same as writing on a wall that so and so is a witch lets burn him. There are many more productive ways to go about this then starting witch hunts. Whoever wrote this should be ashamed

  6. i mean

    Bwog ran the Blue & White piece that showed that people's rapists (who have been found responsible by the University) are still on campus. If these people have been failed by the proper reporting routes, it's not like they really have other options.

    Also everyone is all about ending rape on campus and creating accountable communities until they find out one of their friends/staff writers/classmates is a rapist, and then all of a sudden people care a lot less about supporting survivors & a lot more about hoping that survivors are lying failed vigilantes.

    • Are you fucking kidding me  

      You're actually going to defend this?

    • Wow  

      This is not about turning survivors into lying failed vigilantes. You're an idiot

    • pretty much  

      Ninety percent of these "vigilante vandalism" criticism are wholly valid. But you need to take the past few semesters into account. If the perps are part of the No More Red Tape campaign (as I suspect they are), they've been pretty much placated or denied when they turned to every reasonable option. Their choice is either to give up, or to turn to something apart from the administration entirely

  7. Ridiculous  

    I understand the need to fight rape/sexual assault on campus, but this is plain old harassment, not to mention probably libel as well. There is no justice to be had like this. Two wrongs do not make a right.

    • it is  

      libel. to promote allegations on campus when the public obviously cannot substantiate them

      • Genuinely curious  

        Is it libel if the people (or at least some of them) were found guilty by the university? I personally happen to know that two of the alleged rapists were suspended/left the university because of their sexual assault. I assumed that it wouldn't count as libel in those cases because their guilt was already established by the responsible authority (ie Columbia University)

        • Anonymous

          I'm not a lawyer, but I think it is. Because Columbia keeps all this stuff secret and closed, you can't prove that what you know is true.

          • Genuinely curious  

            Makes sense. Thanks!

          • No.

            Truth is never libel. Even if it turns out to be false, the accusers are still not necessarily guilty of libel. If they had good reason to believe its truth, then they are potentially free of any culpability, regardless of whether it actually turns out to true.

          • Mostly Correct  

            According to the legal dictionary law.com:

            Generally speaking, libel "must be a statement which claims to be fact and is not clearly identified as an opinion. While it is sometimes said that the person making the libelous statement must have been intentional and malicious, actually it need only be obvious that the statement would do harm and is untrue."

            "Proof of malice, however, does allow a party defamed to sue for general damages for damage to reputation, while an inadvertent libel limits the damages to actual harm (such as loss of business) called special damages."

            **However, the problem here is that we're dealing with rape accusations, which might be "so vicious that malice is assumed" (called libel per se), and in this case, one does not "require a proof of intent to get an award of general damages."**

            Thus, if we state that rape accusations count as libel per se (very likely), then the people could sue the list-maker if they have not been (a) previously convicted of rape or, (b) shown during the course of a libel trial to have committed rape.

            Lastly, since these students are not public figures, any libelous statement can be brought to court--for public figures, factual mistakes are excused and only malicious statements are punishable.

  8. Sooo to clarify  

    Loving the downvotes from Bwogees, but it's worth pointing out that it would be very easy to deny OP's comment, and they haven't

  9. Lol  

    Or fed up with the administration's laissez-faire attitude on rape on campus

  10. Let's all be honest  

    We know exactly who wrote these - the same people who've been quoted in Spec and Bwog ad nauseum for months about sexual assault.

    • nah  

      I'd be surprised, they've handled it with maturity and have actually tried to keep the names out of the press.
      I think this is probably one of their friends or acquaintances who's just trying to "get back" or do the right thing, they're just confused about how to do it.

      • Anonymous  

        1/3 college women are sexually assaulted.. it's not like the couple of women who were quoted make up that 33%. there are SO many people who have been assaulted.

        • Lol

          now it's 1/3!!! When did that happen? Must be an epidemic since 1/4 has been the feminist bread and butter stat up until now. A 33% increase is frightening— hide yo kids hide yo wife!

          Let's just call it an even 2/1 or 200%. That seems as reasonable

          • Anonymous

            according to the fbi it's .01%

          • downvote inconvenient truths

            Here are the facts:

            1) The BOGUS "1 in 4 females being rape statistic" has been debunked for years. The study that delusional feminazi's use for this claim was the one done by Mary Koss in 1985 which she even admits was faulted by her use of extremely wide rape definitions where things like "regretting it later" counted as rape. The best studies we have come from the data collected by the FBI and show that the real prevalence is 52 per 100,000 which is less than .1%.

            Source : http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cj...

            Source: http://usatoday30.usatoday.com...

            2) More men are raped in prison alone each year than the total number of women who are raped. Look up the stats. Over 100,000-200,000 male inmates / year. Rape is a crime that affects men much more than it does women. Men are the primary victims.

            Source: http://www.nybooks.com/article...

            Source:

            Sexual Victimization in Prisons and Jails Reported by Inmates, 2011–12: National Inmate Survey, 2011–12

            3) Valid research shows about 41% of rape accusations are false. There is no "rape culture" but there is a false-rape-accusation culture. Here are all the studies showing about half of all rape claims (and I would include yours, unless you can offer compelling evidence that you didn't consent) are BS:

            Source: "False Rape Allegations" by Eugene Kanin, Archives of Sexual Behavior Feb 1994 v23 n1 p81 (12)

        • Anonymous

          Statistics regarding rape and sexual assault are gathered by a variety of agencies. The National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) is the gold standard for crime reporting which gathers comprehensive statistics on crimes ranging from auto theft to burglary.

          It uses sound scientific statistical methods, and places the victimization rate of rape (including many forms of sexual assault) at 0.02% of women and 0.01% of men in 2010.

          The statistics you cite use a definition of rape that includes not only unwanted touching, but any circumstance in which a person consumed alcohol, had consensual sex, and later regretted it.

          To quote Harvard Professor of Psychology, and Chair of the Harvard Psychology Department Dr. Steven Pinker:

          “Junk statistics from advocacy groups are slung around and become common knowledge, such as the incredible factoid that one in four university students has been raped. (The claim was based on a commodious definition of rape that the alleged victims themselves never accepted; it included, for example, any incident in which a woman consented to sex after having had too much to drink and regretted it afterward.”

          Certainly I trust Dr. Pinker’s expert informed opinion, and United States Department of Justice statistics over the opinion of an English professor at Sarah Lawrence. Surely if you included everyone that ever regretted having sex after a night out, the figure would approach 100%.

          • Correction

            I don't know a single Sarah Lawrence faculty member that publishes any work (there is no publish or perish mantra there) so you are being overly generous to my undergraduate alma by attributing research to that faculty. But your general point is correct of course. The oft-cited statistics are misguided.

            That alone doesn't mean that rape is under- or over- deterred. From a consequentialist standpoint it is hard to say what activity we're chilling with relaxed actus reus standards in rape cases. Do we chill the amount of anonymous one-nighters if we make "only yes means yes" the consent standard? Sure, but why is it the roll of the law to privilege anonymous sex? In a funny way the feminists have asked for a legal regime that incentivizes behavior that would be deemed the norm of the pre-sexual revolution era.

            College internal review boards are not institutionally competent to deal with a lot of rape allegations. Historically reviewing allegations of rape has not been the role of colleges. It is unrealistic to expect costly and effective procedures and outcomes from a body that has limited experience and limited budget. This should signal to the victims of rape that their allegations should be channeled to different adjudicatory bodies. Namely court rooms. There you can expect greater punishment and more exhaustive procedure. You might say, wait, isn't the burden of proof high on the prosecution? 1) the actus reus has been relaxed and 2) criminal law is not your only resort. You can also seek civil damages.

            Please, instead of complaining about disciplinary hearings go to a court room. BWOG you would do well to encourage the victims of rape to take productive steps like filing charges and/or seeking counseling. Instead you make a scandal for your school and point out the obvious (i.e., that they lack institutional competency but big whop no college is institutionally competent in this respect). The condemnable invasion of privacy acted upon these alleged rapists is deplorable and a consequence of the misguided advice offered by this blog.

        • Anonymous  

          Whenever people cite a statistic like this I wonder a little bit...
          33% of women??!? WHAT?!
          Let's assume that every guy is a repeat offender, so there are only half as many rapists as rape victims. That means that 16.7% of men will rape in their life time. That's 50.1 MILLION MEN. 50 MILLION! To put that in perspective, 159,000 people a year die from lung cancer, a leading cause of death amongst americans. 9,865 people died from drunk driving accidents. But 100 million women get raped and this isn't the event of the century?
          If this were true, wouldn't it be a national disaster? (Please don't reply with "rape culture" etc). Forget national disaster, wouldn't it be all anyone thought about ever? If the odds of one of the worst things that can happen to a human being were 1 in 3 if you were a woman?

    • Anonymous  

      i don't think that those people are the writers b/c as the poster above me said, those people have maintained utmost confidentiality.

      But wouldn't it make sense for people who were sexually assaulted to be the people both quoted in the news and the ones who know the names of the assailant? Isn't that just common sense?

  11. There has got to be a better way  

    Though I support the campaign to make CU's treatment of sexual violence more just, I think some of the activists' understanding of the problem is severely misguided. The central problem, I think, is that rape -- one of the most heinous crimes imaginable but still a crime in the narrow legal sense -- is not dealt with in the proper venues when it takes place on campus. For good and bad reasons, the police rarely get involved. A good reason not to involve the police would be that from the perspective of an individual victim, the prospect of dealing with police scrutiny is often more traumatic than doing nothing, but this is only indicative of the very bad reason that our legal and criminal institutions are unsafe for victims of sexual violence. Rape is too often excluded from the legitimate sphere of official state authority, often because the police's own practices delegitimize this authority.

    I think some people who are committed to this issue want to keep rape as an exception to the official process of law rather than fight to overcome the problems that make it an exception. For example, they would have punishment of rapists depend on the whim of the victims rather than the disinterested authority of law; the vigilante efforts to name alleged rapists is an instance of this demand. A much wiser strategy would be to demand that the university put its resources and influence towards making the legal and criminal institutions safer for victims to report instances of rape and seek justice: in short, to reinstate rape within the official criminal process.

    • Anonymous

      Also, if rapes were reported to the police, then the convictions of rapists would be public record and we wouldn't need these damn witch hunts.

    • Anonymous  

      This is far too intelligent and articulate to be a Bwog comment

    • Correction

      Victims might find the procedure leading up to crime difficult. But you cannot expect any recourse from extra-judicial sources. The law is perfectly reasonable in scrutinizing all criminal allegations. We would not want to be held accountable to crimes that carry high stigma and prison sentences without exhaustive legal proceedings. Keep in mind a felony conviction comes with losing the right to vote and probably never getting a decent job again.

      So what do you want police to do? Not question the victim, not assemble evidence? Would you prefer if they prosecuted without any evidence on the basis of a bare allegation alone? Then you would have the case tossed out by the judge, perhaps the prosecutor would be sanctioned. If you care about victims you should try to create a "Report culture." By that I mean a culture where victims report the crimes immediately. If they do so a lot of necessary evidence could be easily attained. Rape cases are more easily won when the victim reports it promptly and the police can collect evidence in the way of seamen and bruising. Don't cry about rape culture if you do not try to create a report culture.

      • Correcting Corrections  

        "Keep in mind a felony conviction comes with losing the right to vote and probably never getting a decent job again." - Correction

        I am shocked when such misinformation and prejudice is spread. Both of your assertions disproportionately reflect disenfranchisement affecting minority and socioeconomically disadvantaged communities.

        New York instituted a Ban the Box initiative to combat such prejudices, soon after the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission released a guidance that hoped to combat such discrimination. Other cities and states have since replicated these Ban the Box efforts. Only KY, VA and FL continue to uphold permanent bans on voting rights for those who have met all expectations of restitution for their crimes.

        Your statement binds criminality with poverty and is one that has been repeated throughout history. As one of these former dirty poor criminals, I implore you to think before you speak.

        • Correction

          Sir or Madame I believe you misread me. I was emphasizing how stigmatizing the results of felony conviction can be, I was by no means belittling the devastating effects of such conviction. I mentioned the stigmatizing force upon felony convicts in order to emphasize that the criminal law correctly places a large burden on the prosecution. I think we both agree that the devastating loss of voting rights (whether they end after incarceration, parole, or require appeal) and the challenges to find gainful employment should be considered as part of the punishment exerted by the criminal law. Some have criticized the criminal law for not making the conviction of alleged rapists easier. I merely sought to point out that advocates for reduced burden on the prosecution should bear in mind the devastating impact a felony conviction has on the convict especially the indigent and consider the systemic effects of reduced burdens.

  12. Lol  

    Whatever secret meeting precipitated this was surely begun with some chanting of "vulvaaaaa"...

  13. Shade  

    "perhaps writing this list (and publishing the triggering work of a campus “vigilante”) is not the best way to create a safer campus environment for victims."

    - bwog, throwing mad shade at the loin and spec

    • survivor here  

      To clarify: I am not triggered by Bwog publishing a blurred out list of rapist's names. The only thing triggering about this is Bwog's unbelievably sanctimonious use of the word 'triggering' in a bullshit context to pretend as though the needs of survivors was at all a concern when determining whether to publish this.

      • another student and survivor  

        Seconding the comment above!

        And I saw the actual names written in Lerner and am VERY glad to know this info so I can avoid these people at all costs.

      • MK  

        I think the issue here is that whoever wrote this piece can't write. By triggering, I think Bwog meant the original list in the stall, not an image with blurred names.

      • another survivor  

        Already commented here, but wanted to firmly second everything about the above message. (I also think there are more of us on campus than the average student or administrator tends to believe)

  14. inb4  

    Some nutjob writes down a list of alleged sluts on campus.

  15. Cool!  

    Next time a guy pisses a girl off for whatever reason, onto the rapist list with him! Now men must live in perpetual fear of someone ruining their fucking life because they feel like it, well done feminists!

    • girl  

      yeah i wonder what it's life living in perpetual fear...

      • guy  

        You know what? Fuck you and your snark. Men die earlier, have higher suicide rates and are much more likely to die a violent death than women do. We face higher rates of incarceration. Higher rates of unemployment. We fare worse in American schools. We make up most of the homeless population in America. There are literally a zillion other problems men face that idiots like you [Note, not women, idiots: your ignorance is on you.] will never recognize because they're not convenient to consider at a place like Columbia, where half-assed appeals to 'the patriarchy' are used to justify damn near anything that isn't outright misandry.

        I could go on, but I'll end on the fact that we ALSO make up about HALF of sexual assault victims. If you think it's OK to leverage your identity in order to pile on the possibility that we'll have to deflect rape accusations from anonymous creeps writing stuff on bathroom walls, then I think you're very, very morally confused.

        • oh gawddddd  

          Men have higher suicide rates and violent deaths because they are more likely to use firearms and high-mortality methods. (Women, on the other hand, have higher reports of *attempted* suicide.) They have higher incarcerations rates and higher homicide rates because men overwhelmingly perpetrate crimes, as well as violence towards all genders.

          Also, I don't know where the heck you're getting your sexual assault statistics, but according to RAINN, men constitute about 10% of sexual assault victims.

          Men in this country do face problems, you're right. Patriarchy isn't a person, it's a way of thinking that inflicts harm on both genders. And the list goes on: There's the gender binary, sexual assault double-standards, the prison/army-industrial complex, racist drug and law enforcement policies targeting men of color, gun culture, stigmatized mental health and secrecy for men.

          But right now, buddy, all you're doing is taking up unnecessary space and derailing a conversation about victims of sexual assault on this campus; victims who are predominantly female but also male. So please, shut up and take this conversation elsewhere.

          • Anonymous

            How do you really feel about men?

          • its not that simple  

            Firstly, I am not 'guy', so don't try to straw man this comment. Although he is slightly off base and overly confrontational, I am disheartened by the use of fedora jokes to silence him. Anyway...

            In your first paragraph you make many true statements, but you completely avoid the issue at hand. It is true that men attempt suicide less often than women, and it is true that men are the overwhelming perpetrators of violent crime. However, that is not an adequate response, or really any response at all.

            Ultimately, 4 men commit suicide for every woman, 3 men are murdered for every woman, 9 men are killed in the workplace for every woman, and most tellingly, men receive 63% longer prison sentences and are half as likely to be avoid incarceration after being convicted (controlled for extraneous factors). Also, men are 'forced to penetrate' at an equal rate to women who are forcibly penetrated. However, modern definitions of rape do not consider being forced to penetrate as being raped, which is clearly ridiculous and sexist.

            So, men face many systemic and unavoidable risks by virtue of their sex. I limited my examples to those that contradicted your points, but I can assure you that there are many more statistics that demonstrate this beyond all doubt. We seem agree on that much, but I think that you significantly misunderstand the nature and severity of these problems in your spurious (read: pulled out of your ass) list.

            Unfortunately, now I begin to have real problems with your post. According to wikipedia, "feminism defines patriarchy as an unjust social system that is oppressive to women". I recognize that doing lip service to the evils that the 'patriarchy' inflicts on men has become fashionable, but it is ultimately just that, lip service. The patriarchy has always been and will always be, by virtue of its derivation, a term that denotes a system in which men are privileged. Furthermore, it implicitly assumes the guilt of powerful men as the source of oppression, whether against men or women. So I do not agree that 'the patriarchy' is "a way of thinking that inflicts harm on both genders". Rather, we should call things as they are. Society itself, as a whole, is the source of the injustices against both men and women.

            Finally, it is true that this article is about sexual assault on campus and that these comments do not directly address that issue. However, aside from the absurdity of "taking up space" on an online comments section, I think you'll find that many of the comments here are related to gender issues. For better or worse, bwog comments are one of the few venues at Columbia in which people are willing to voice their views about these controversial topics. This is especially pertinent for those who wish to discuss men's rights activism, because of the crushing social stigma attached to such views. The highly upvoted memes in response to 'guy' are indubitable evidence of a culture that casually dismisses men's rights activists as a knee jerk defense mechanism. Although I sympathize with and support the men's rights movement, I would never dream of admitting that to many of my friends at this school. And that's a really sad thing to have to say.

            In conclusion (to an unexpectedly long post), I would ask that you check the privilege that you have to speak openly and freely about feminism in a variety of venues. Many of us are not so fortunate, and your intention to silence the voices in advocacy of men's rights even in an anonymous online setting shows how dismissive many are of the movement. It is this hostility that has provoked the anger towards feminism in 'guy's initial comments. When the only venue in which one can express their struggles and feelings honestly is one that is constantly lambasted and mocked, it can be frustrating to see the analogous movement (feminism) be so mainstream and simultaneously so hostile to what could and should be its greatest ally in the ongoing fight for egalitarianism.

            Sources:
            Suicide: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gender_differences_in_suicide
            Murder: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sex_differences_in_crime
            Workplace Fatalities (page 8): http://www.bls.gov/iif/oshwc/cfoi/cfch0005.pdf
            Judicial Discrimination: http://www.law.umich.edu/newsandinfo/features/Pages/starr_gender_disparities.aspx
            Sexual Violence Victimization (pages 18-19): http://www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention/pdf/NISVS_Report2010-a.pdf

          • @ "its not that simple"  

            this was actually very helpful (to myself) to read, so thank you.

  16. Anonymous  

    This reminds me of how, after the boston marathon bombing, reddit tried to figure out who did it and totally zeroed in on the wrong guy (a middle eastern-looking kid who went missing a few months before). They all harassed his family and only afterwards realized that it was the wrong person. The point is, just because you read a name of a "rapist" someone wrote on a bathroom wall doesn't mean anything. Yes, the administration is useless when it comes to dealing with sexual violence on campus, but if you think this is justifiable or fixes anything then you're not thinking clearly. This is the definition of a witch hunt.

  17. Borat

    Throw the rapist down the well!

  18. To the person that did this:

    You may be angry. Hell, you may be more than that, and perhaps justifiably so given the way Columbia has treated you throughout this process. But you have no idea how big a mistake this was.

    By doing this, you just legitimized every administrator who has tried to slow down the process, every official who has stressed caution, and in general every obstructionist that you have been fighting against. Now there IS a reason for caution, for slowing down - you just started a witch hunt. You just handed Columbia exactly what it was looking for: a reason to justify its slow, bureaucratic process.

    It is bad enough that you likely slandered people at the school. But this list now legitimizes the argument about why we need this sexual assault policy. Like it or not, you just made things a hell of a lot worse.

  19. Anonymous  

    My main concern is victims being believed, not protecting rapists. However, writing a list of names on a bathroom wall does not punish rapists properly. Bathroom walls are not generally considered to be credible sources to any extent. Additionally, if victims are in the process of seeking justice for the crimes committed against them, however unlikely they are to get it, lists printed with their rapist's names may actually be damaging to their case due to Columbia's exceedingly strict confidentiality agreement in sexual assault cases. Tucker Reed at USC published the name of her rapist online and ended up being countersued for libel, which was absolutely preposterous: http://www.xojane.com/issues/tucker-reed-outs-rapist-at-usc
    Unfortunately we live in a world where victims are nearly always discredited on legal technicalities. I am sure these lists are meant to raise awareness but they may have unintended consequences.

  20. Hodor  

    1) Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor, Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor. Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor, Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor.

    2) Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor. Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor, Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor.

    3) Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor.

    4) Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor, Hodor Hodor Hodor, Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor. Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor, Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor, Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor Hodor.

    Hodor Hodor,

    Hodor

  21. Anonymous  

    Does it not bother people how quickly this can turn into McCarthyism? What's to keep me from defaming an ex? I think it's important for women to be able to see this list but I'm not entirely sure we should ostracize these people when their accuser can be shrouded behind a veil of anonymity.

    In real trials, people have to be willing to publicly admit that this horrible of an act happened to them, adding pressure to keep people from falsely claiming they were sexually assaulted.

    When will we start questioning the validity of this list- would we even question it if someone on the list turns out to be gay?

  22. bc '14

    why is this conversation centered around protecting alleged perpetrators instead of survivors of sexual assault?

    why are we so concerned with protecting the integrity of the rapists instead of preventing survivors from being triggered or reminded of their assault when they are simply trying to use the bathroom?

    • guy  

      My guess is that because in the criminal justice system, in the face of uncertainty, the rule of thumb is:

      Not ruining an innocent person > Locking away a criminal

      What I don't understand is why this needs to be explained to people who are old enough to be in college.

    • Anonymous

      because there is something in this country called "innocent until proven guilty," so the persons on the list who haven't yet been convicted of anything (which is not all of them) are at this point innocent.

      it honestly baffles you don't get that

    • i see what you did there  

      I like how you use "alleged perpetrators" and "rapists" interchangeably.

    • Tyrion Lannister  

      Because accused individuals are innocent until proven otherwise.

      Now, it may have looked like I *SPOILER ALERT* poisoned Joffrey, but that doesn't mean you can just go posting my name on a "Kingslayer List" around the latrines of Westeros on a hunch.

      Let the courtroom show its judgment, then I will willfully submit to my defamation at your grubby courtier hands.

      Otherwise, let me drink my wine in peace.

    • BC '16  

      You're right--some people continue to think that being falsely accused of rape (or even convicted of rape: see media reaction to steubenville) is worse than being an actual victim of sexual assault. Rape culture means that we're taught to prioritize the needs of aggressors or potential aggressors over the needs and voices of survivors.

      It's disgusting.

      • Anon  

        You're right--some people continue to think that being falsely accused of rape (or even convicted of rape: see media reaction to steubenville) is worse than being an actual victim of sexual assault. Rape culture means that we're taught to prioritize the needs of aggressors or potential aggressors over the needs and voices of survivors.

        It's disgusting.

        I agree that the media reaction to Steubenville was awful and they should not have been portraying the rapists in such a sympathetic light and ignoring the actual victim. However, I think that this is a very different situation - those men had been found guilty by a court of law. The people being named on these lists have not gone through the same process. Of course we should (contrary to what rape culture tells us) prioritize the needs of survivors over the needs of aggressors in the case of convicted rapists, but we shouldn't be prioritizing anyone when we aren't even sure if certain people are truly aggressors.

      • Correction

        The law does not act in the normative fashion you have attributed to it. It is not a matter of prioritizing the harms experienced by victims or alleged perpetrators. We have established a criminal law that exacts heavy punishments in the way of jail time and stigma so we have a high burden of proof for all offenses actionable at criminal law. By contrast the civil law system is limited to injunctive relief and money damages, there the burden of proof is lower.

        In probabilistic terms we have a higher rate of false negatives with the criminal law than we do with the civil law. But that is deliberate choice in light of the stiff punishment offered by the criminal law. It is not deliberately designed to prejudice the victims of rape. For example a rape victim could bring the charges through a civil action and the burden of proof would be significantly lower. If you want a lower threshold for winning a legal battle don't begrudge the foundation of criminal law.

  23. Anon  

    Regardless of the overall merits of Manhattanville, it doesn't strike me as unreasonable to deny the moral equivalence of a *violent crime* and the seizure of private property with compensation

  24. Rachel, CC 16  

    As a victim of sexual assault and harassment since I was 9, seriously screw the people who wrote these names. You do NOT speak for all victims/survivors.
    Justice for sexual assault and rape is one thing, but publicly shaming people who may or may not be guilty at your own discretion is fucking horrendous. Some of the people on this list may be accused but innocent, and there is no excuse for putting their names up for everyone to pass judgment upon them. Stop fucking parading these people around as if their monsters. It sickens me and I'm seriously pissed off by this.

  25. just want to add  

    the location of these lists, on the inside of girls bathroom stalls, to me demonstrates that the author(s) might've had less of an intention in defaming, accusing, or making public the names but rather simply wished to warn other women.

    • Anonymous  

      While that may have been the original intention, since this has begun to be reported on it is become an act of activism rather than public awareness. Also that assumes that men are not victims of rape which is not accurate.

      • Anonymous

        It does not assume that men are not raped, it assumes that women are raped more (which isn't untrue). Also, I would think that the people primarily raping on campus men would not be the same people primarily raping women on campus.

    • Anonymous  

      "but rather simply wished to warn other women"

      Whoever sent these pictures in did so before facilities could take it down. They are probably the same person wrote it.

      I think that should clear up any concerns about intent.

      • Anonymous

        If the perpetrators were the ones submitting the tips, then Bwog and Spec likely would have received the same tips... Bwog and Spec received different tips.

    • Ughh  

      Yes but what matters aren't the intentions but the consequences. You should be intellectually mature enough to think through those if you are at this school.

  26. well  

    I'm no expert, but I don't think Bwog can publish this list. I think because of libel laws / title IX it would be illegal, but ask a lawyer, not me. Someone I know explained why it wouldn't be legal but i forgot what they said.

  27. Anonymous

    wow you girls are fucking retarded. this is why we need to separate from Barnard. so glad I left this school. it went from a prestigious college to a fucking middle school. stop ruining my school's reputation. I hate you all.

  28. Appalled  

    These lists will only serve to hurt the cause. Writing names of alleged attackers in a bathroom stall constitutes slander and completely bypasses the legal system that should deal with these issues. To whomever is writing these: stop now or risk losing supporters on campus.

  29. cc '15

    this whole movement went from a noble inspiring thing to vigilante justice and calls for book burning in like a month fuck this you're making a really important issue seem reactionary and stupid

  30. ''''''  

    I can understand why an individual frustrated with the judicial system might be compelled to do something like this--the thought of the person who raped them walking around campus and assaulting others is disturbing. And this, from what I know, seems to be why many victims choose to report their assaults rather than remain silent. When the judicial system fails to bring rapists to justice, this might look like the only way to prevent more rapes. Desperate times, you know--and sitting on your hands while you wait for the university to make real changes and while rapists run free and rampant (exaggeration) is not a great option.

    But, I can't imagine that anyone would think it's a good idea to create a public list of unconfirmed rapists to which anyone can anonymously add. Intentions aside, the possible repercussions are too huge, like you all have been saying. I personally don't think that people are going to jump at the opportunity to ruin their enemies' and ex-significant others' lives by putting them on the list (how old are we), but the possibility and the ease of it are too large to risk.

    I can only hope that the bathroom stall thing is a gesture at administration to say "if you don't fucking do what you are supposed to do, this is what we'll resort to" and/or "your neglect and passivity are not without consequences." I'd like to think that whoever has done this is aware of the possibility of a "witch hunt," and of false accusations, but equally aware that Columbia will scramble to cover this up and that not a lot of names of accused will really get out there--just the fact that names were written. In other words, that whoever it is has foreseen all of the shits we're flipping and those shits are part of the plan to frighten administration into listening to us. Who knows!

    And, the possibility of false accusations always seems to be way, way overblown. Clearly it's possible, but I can imagine very few circumstances in which the instigators here, the ones who first put the names up, would intentionally accuse an innocent person of rape. If someone wanted to destroy a life, this would seem like an oddly roundabout and way too elaborate (albeit affective) way to do it, and I refuse to believe that anyone is that type of mastermind. As for accidentally false accusations, the perpetrators here were most likely victims or friends of victims or actively involved in the anti-sexual assault campaign and not likely to be putting up names all willy-nilly. Again, it's POSSIBLE, but I doubt muchly that it's so likely to occur as to be the primary worry here--*in the original lists,* that is. On the other hand, the likelihood that other malicious people will jump onboard and begin supplementing the existing lists with false names is much higher. Hence why I'd like to believe that perps knew Columbia would have the lists blacked out in moments.

    • Anonymous  

      "I personally don't think that people are going to jump at the opportunity to ruin their enemies' and ex-significant others' lives by putting them on the list (how old are we)"

      why do you accept that a human could be monstrous enough to rape another person but not monstrous enough to write another person's name on a bathroom stall?

      • ',',','  

        probably because i'm naive, but as i said, the existence of the possibility makes this thing dangerous regardless of what i think about humans.

        abt judicial system - i meant Columbia's, not New York's, and from what I can gather colleges tend not to follow state laws when no one is watching. is that accurate?

        • Anonymous  

          I think the reasoning behind that is a smaller, more self-contained organization (like a University) should be able to govern and police itself better than a larger, more diverse organization. The problem with Columbia is Columbia's administration and policing skills are horrible. This is relatively benign when dealing with underage drinking and weed smoking, not so much for assault.

    • Correction

      The justice system is actually highly progressive when it comes to rape. If you engaged in comparative legal analysis you would realize that. Many states (including New York) have abandoned the force requirement. Now the only actus reus requirements are sexual act without consent. Proving a lack of consent is similarly lowered. It used to be that you had to express no (i.e. "no means no") but now many states require an affirmative indication on the part of the victim (i.e. "only yes means yes"). On top of this the low mens rea standard has remained steady as the actus reus standard has been relaxed. Thus mistake of fact defenses are routinely tossed out. There has never been a greater time in human history to bring a rape allegation to a court of law.

      Unless you are asking for strict liability exclusively on the basis of an allegation and proof of damages (i.e a rape law analogue to products liability law) the legal system really cannot go any farther to help victims.

      This is why criticism of the judicial system is almost exclusively made by laypersons who have not read the statutes related to rape.

      • jd '14

        whatever you say, kid. just know that the criminal law intersects with poor protections for victim privacy (courts have routinely allowed newspapers to publish victims' names under the first amendment, for example), insufficient sexual assault training by law enforcement (this lack of understand being one of the reasons sexual assault victims are often not believed--and why sexual assault claims are often not investigated), and lack of interest by prosecutors to take such cases. BUT I GUESS BECAUSE THIS IS THE BEST POSSIBLE TIME TO BE A RAPE VICTIM WE SHOULD ALL JUST BE HAPPY HUH?

        • Correction

          Nice job reciting the facts of Florida Star, a first amendment case that you presumably studied in con law two years ago (if in fact you aren't a 1L at the moment). Internal police procedure can be improved compare the police of today to the police force of 50 years ago. Mutt & Jeff tactics are largely gone; sleep deprivation tactics are no longer the norm; physical torture is gone. Police have changed before and they can change again. So if you want them to be more sensitive to rape victims I'm sure there is a way to accomplish that. But channeling rape victims to University Administrative process will invariably lead to the police having less experience with college students and their rape accusations. Police will only get worse at handling students if we overinvest in non-legal channels.

  31. Alum

    This is a disgusting way to seek out justice. I had supported this movement, until now.

    • well....  

      just because you don't like this incident doesn't mean you should stop supporting the movement...

    • Ughh  

      There are extremist fringe groups within every movement--including every one you currently support. I'm sure the vast majority of people seeking sexual assault reform disapprove of this like you. The real platform consists of effective, just, and basically common-sense measures against sexual assault. Why would you stop supporting this platform just because a very small minority tried to be vigilantes? It makes no sense to me.

  32. Anonymous

    I think that the fact that Spec was able to verify that at least one of the people on the list actually were faced with disciplinary action due to sexual assault might speak to the likelihood that these were false accusations.

  33. A concerned shitter  

    Wait, that paper wasn't there to wipe with? Oops.

  34. Anonymous

    I am amazed that so many brilliant minds do not understand why it is WRONG to publish these lists. Anyone's name could be added to such a list. If you can not imagine someone's name being included falsely then you are truly naive.

  35. GS '14

    I see we have all learned about presumption of innocence in high school civics......

  36. Anonymous  

    Looks like it was the same person who wrote them all.

  37. NYU Student

    Very shocked this happened at an Ivy League school.

  38. NYU Student

    *that this

  39. Disgusting

    Just saying, since I'm not a piece of shit and value the privacy of all of my peers, if I see this being posted, I will use any and all means necessary to neutralize this bull shit. Stand up for what's right people. Take this shit down. To the people doing this, I hope you get cholera.

  40. Survivor  

    Although I understand the desire to warn other students about potentially dangerous people on campus as well as the catharsis that survivors may find in writing down the name of their attacker, I think that this has the potential to get far too out of hand.

    While there are definitely personal benefits to being able to write down a name anonymously, the lack of attachment and responsibility that people who contribute to these types of list have to their claims allows for people to make false allegations much more easily.

    I am not by any means saying that the majority of accusations are false, but the potential for innocent people to slandered and have no way to defend themselves is just too high for this to be a positive and productive course of action.

  41. guys

    Why are we turning Columbia into a court system? If you were mugged you would go to the police right? So why are we reporting rape to the university instead of law enforcement? Columbia isn't necessarily equipped with dealing with these sorts of things. Also lets completely throw due process out the window. SEXUAL ASSAULT IS A CRIME....lets go to the police.

  42. Anonymous

    this is why we need a men's rights group on campus. expel the vandals, and sue them for defamation of character. that is justice.

  43. Anonymous

    Just wanted to note that this dangerous behavior is the same "we must protect ourselves and take the situation into our own hands" mentality that led to a woman being beaten to death as a suspected witch in Brazil earlier this week.

    The students that did this should know better than to perpetuate these kind of backwards actions.

  44. Anonymous

    this is pathetic. sue, expel and/or revoke the degree from the subhumans responsible for this sophomoric slander. makes me want to vomit such wastes of oxygen exist.

  45. Maybe BWOG will censor this but...  

    Whose names were on the list?

  46. Anonymous  

    May be the only one who thinks this, but this is an effective way to make sure those guys (if they're guilty) are watched out for. As someone who has experience sexual violence, I'd love to have known before to watch out for the person.

  47. BC '16  

    A lot of people are expressing concerns about due process and "innocent until proven guilty" precedent. I don't know about the handwritten ones, but this clearer image of the flyers (http://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/image/upload/s--ZYaDhU3t--/c_fit,fl_progressive,q_80,w_636/zkljg6sxy7qn4epigunb.jpg) lists people who have been found "responsible" by the university. The others are unverifiable (and may very well be innocent), but those three people HAVE been proven guilty, at least in our bureaucratic pseudo-legal process. How can we feel safe when these people are still on campus, and the University continues to protect their names?

  48. Anonymous  

    Honestly, sucks to suck. If you committed a crime that was your own damn fault so why be surprised if survivors retaliate.

  49. though

    I know quite a few people, on campus, who HAVE been that master-minded.

  50. cc '15  

    nice job taking vocab tips from tal fortang, asshole. Weltanschauung?

  51. Anonymous  

    I spent quite a while searching the recesses of the internet for the names on this list, wondering if one of my rapists (I never reported) was on it, at first thinking I'd feel validated and somewhat avenged if they were, then realizing I should feel guilty, for not doing anything to keep what happened to me from happening to someone else. Then I remembered they've both graduated. I'm graduating now, and there's a lot of nostalgia surrounding that. You pass a flyer for a club you might want to join or class you might want to take and remember you're done. You think of the friends you had all these good times with and remember they've left. Looking to see if my rapists had been brought to some strange justice then remembering they're not still on campus for people to "look out for" is a really dark note in that same pool of thoughts.

  52. Anon

    Is there anywhere to see the list of names?

  53. hey guys  

    I have a list of murderers:

    John McCain
    Barack Obama
    Hillary Clinton
    Bill DeBlasio
    Rudy Giuliani
    Michael Bloomberg


    IT'S TRUE BECAUSE I SAID SO!!!
    LET'S GO LYNCH THESE PEOPLE!!!!!

  54. For defamation, whether libel or slander, the statement has to be false. i wonder who will sue and risk a mini-trial on this issue.

  55. to win on defamation, the statement has to be false. i wonder who will sue and risk a mini-trial on this issue.

  56. Can someone explain  

    Why would students found "responsible" be allowed to stay here? I am actually confused. Otherwise, it seems like they're just getting a slap on the wrist.

    Just to be clear, I don't support the public lists.

  57. *scrolls down comments*  

    HOW do you people not have FINALS to study for?

  58. Cmon Bwog  

    How hard is sorting comments chronologically?

  59. Anonymous

    Procreation is a biological imperative, the most fundamental and important thing one must do to promote their species. Surely you can see that in a culture that values the promotion of the human race, rape could be seen as a powerful and flattering gesture. Being selected by a dominant partner to continue the species. Only in our perverse individual oriented culture do we consider sex and procreation to be so terrible, or work ourselves into hysterics over an unwanted sexual act. Get over yourselves!

  60. X

    The fine Ivy League institutions of America are bastions of rape and greed, whose products end up in the American power structure and further its corruption and the decay of a nation.

  61. Anonymous

    The blokes merely emulate thier elders - the grant-grubbing professulas who will black list their victims as rabble-rousers unable to ever get into any graduate program once th ewhispering begins. This is why we must automate all academic decisionmaking and put all courses online where discretion shall not rule oppressively!

© 2006-2015 Blue and White Publishing Inc.