Apr

29

It’s Lit In The Lab: A Sonnet About Science Research

Written by

hella true

The Columbia/Barnard science community is blessed with countless lab research opportunities. Here, a first-year undergraduate researcher documents his experiences with a sonnet. He would like to preface this poem by stating that STEM, and not creative writing, is his forte.

You send out emails left and right:
“Please won’t you have me in your lab?”
Professors ghost you; you really hang tight,
And finally get invited to do research that’s fab!

You don’t know how to use a pipette,
All the PCR results that you get are crap.
You might as well get your data from playing roulette,
Why beat the learning curve if you can take a nap?

Your graduate mentor has the patience of a saint,
Now your gel electrophoresis doesn’t look so sad.
You read papers, review textbooks, and finally get trained,
You’re getting the hang of this – hey this isn’t so bad!

If you like science, join a lab – it’ll be neat!
You might publish a paper one day – now that’s a feat!

bio meme via the facebook group: High Recombination Frequency Biology Memes

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2 Comments

  1. xyz  

    literally why
    this content is horrible

  2. Anonymous

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