Apr

24

Written by

Overseen in Butler at 2 am.

Good morning, Columbia! Happy last week of classes! You’re almost there. You’ve worked so hard this semester and we’re so proud of you. #feels. Anyways, here’s today’s Bwoglines.

Happening in the nation: He’s back. That’s right, kids— Barry is back. Today, President Obama will make a speech at the University of Chicago, marking his first public appearance since leaving the White House.

Happening in NYC: In light of Earth Day this past weekend, a new bill in the NYC City Council will require all businesses to both recycle and compost.

Happening on campus: Today at noon in the East Ramp Lounge of Lerner, Title IX Coordinator Marjorie Fisher will be giving a talk on policy related to sexual assault. Come listen in on the chat to see where the future of this policy is headed.

Overheard: A prospie just pronounced Bwog “bee-wog.”

It’s the last week of classes! You can do it!

Image via Bwogger

Apr

23

Written by

This important event is happening on Tuesday, 4/25!

Bucket List represents the intellectual privilege we enjoy as Columbia students. We do our very best to bring to your attention important guest lecturers and special events on campus. Our recommendations for this week are below, and the full list is after the jump. If you notice any events that have been left off the list, or if you have a correction, please let us know in the comments.

Recommended

  • “Poetics of Justice: A Conversation Between Claudia Rankine and Dionne Brand” Tuesday, April 25, 6:00 pm. Sulzberger Parlor. Claudia Rankine, Dionne Brand.
  • “Queering Sexual Violence: A Night of Healing Through Performance” Monday, April 24, 6:00 – 8:00 pm. Lerner Hall, Blackbox Theater. LGBTQ @ Columbia, Sexual Violence Response, Undergraduate Student Life.
  • “Rape, Popular Culture, and Post-Racial America” Tuesday, April 25, 6:00 – 8:00 pm. Low Library Faculty Room. Dr. Salamishah Tillet.
  • “Feminist to the Core with Jack Halberstam on Sigmund Freud” 4:00 – 6:00 pm. Butler Library, Room 523. Jack Halberstam.

Read more about events next week after the jump

Apr

23

Written by

Another semester has passed. Half of your 70000$ tuition is down the drain. You have been going every financial/investment banking/consulting events, but you still don’t know if you really want to go down that path. Maybe you are unsatisfied with your majors. Maybe you still don’t know what you want to study. Maybe you don’t know when you will finally gather up the will power to do your laundry. But everything is fine, you know that Bwog will always be at Lerner 505 at 7 pm on these glorious Sundays, waiting for you. You know there will be groceries, sweets that will make everything less painful.

image from Creative Commons

Apr

23

Written by

Bwog staff writer and daily editor, Timmy Wu, reflects on his first year of College life, and presents to you a rare, indecisive reflection on Columbia.

Today had to have been the six-thousandth time that I saw campus tour guides herding prospective students and their parents into Furnald, pointing out the woodwork of the lobby and the top-notch facilities. They filed into the abnormally large model room. There was no laundry from three weeks ago, no hidden bottles of whiskey and wine, no hair intertwined in the polyester fibers on the carpet. In the prospective students’ pamphlet, there are statistics, polished ones that don’t necessary translate into what you experience in Columbia. There are resources for the unquenchable, ever-expanding young minds, it wrote. There are spaces where you could talk about the things you cared about. There are gazillion clubs where you will find people who share your interests, with whom you will build a relationship that lasts forever after bouts and bouts of social anxieties, feeling of isolation and loneliness.

Like traveling through a tunnel, looking at the bright light yonder, you dived into Columbia, accepted the admission offer with naive ecstasy, without knowing that, shit, you have to get through these hours of very very nasty feelings. So here is a fluffy Bwoglove to those classmates with whom you suffered in First Year Arabic class, friends whom you immediately called after you woke up from a night of debauchery, and finally, clubs that somehow (mistakenly) did not reject you. Hold on to them. Tell them you thank them for getting through this rugged year by your side, tell them that you are willing to go to Ferris if they are feeling extra adventurous today.

Apr

23

Written by

Bwog is back with a guideline on how to step your Tinder game up to your maximum. In the vitriolic dating scene of New York City, Tinder can either save you or ruin you, and this is just a matter of how good your profile is. Just do as we say and you will be fine.

  • First and foremost, make sure you have Columbia University in the City of New York in your profile. Take advantage of the elitism that this school provides you with. Make sure “in the City of New York” is included because if the school name is longer it sounds more official and more important.
  • But don’t put it in your bio. The repeat makes you sound like a tryhard.
  • Any internships? Researcher positions? Include that shit. As with the first clause, make sure the position name is as long as possible, because it sounds more important that way. For example, instead of saying “Intern at CUMC,” say “Undergraduate Research Intern at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC).”
  • Do you work at Goldman Sachs? Include it. Do you not work at Goldman Sachs? Pretend you do. 

    Enough said.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What else should you do?

Apr

23

Written by

Happening in the world: Amid high tension in the Korean peninsula, after the US warns North Korea that its “strategic patience” is over, North Korea detained Kim Dong-chul, a 62-year-old naturalized US citizen born in South Korea. (BBC)

Happening in the US: Us actress Erin Moran, best known for playing Joanie in sitcom Happy Days in the 1970’s has died at age 56. (BBC)

Happening in NYC: NYC celebrated Earth Day by clearing Broadway of traffic from 10 am to 4 pm, here are some photos of the events. (NBC New York)

Happening on campus: Matthew Casey wil be at Sulzberger Hall 3rd Floor Parlor, presenting his new book Empire’s Guest Worker, that discusses the “on-the-ground experiences of Haitian migrants in Cuba” and how their actions shaped “larger processes of US imperialism, economic penetration, race-making and shifts in global migration policies”.

Want to know how to write hit songs like The Chainsmoker, here is a tutorial:

 

image from creative commons

Apr

22

Written by

If you need to get signed into someone else’s dorm tonight, there’s a pretty good chance you’ll forget to pick up your ID on the way out, then panic a few minutes (or hours, or days) later. So, how do you go about asking for it back from the desk guard? Managing Editor Betsy Ladyzhets has put together a handy flowchart to help you figure that out, based on way too much personal experience.

Every possible ID-forgetting scenario?

Apr

22

Written by

Honestly, we put up with a lot of shit (weather-wise) as New Yorkers. Yet, between the time we’re bombarded by hail in 15ºF weather and baked by the summer humidity, there is a 2-month sliver of time (April-May) where we’re reminded by how pleasant nature can actually be.

In celebration of Earth Day, we asked Bwoggers to take pictures of campus and of New York City in all its springtime glory. Next time you walk to class, take a moment to appreciate how lucky you are to have such a gorgeous campus.

 

luscious lawns since 1754

 

 

Greek columns and chill

More aesthetic photos after the jump

Apr

22

Written by

Art expresses the full range of human experience, in all its beauty and aspirations. No matter your interests or background, you are guaranteed to find in the city of New York art that speaks to you. Earlier today, Bwog posted arts events happening on campus. In this post, Bwog describes art exhibitions happening in Manhattan, most of them free to Barnumbia students.

For the fashionista: The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Rei Kawakubo / Comme des Garçons: Art of the In-Between

May 4 – September 4: FREE

The Met seems to have it all: Monets, Japanese calligraphy, even an Egyptian temple. However, most visitors don’t know that the Met has a constantly changing fashion exhibit, featuring the most important developments in fashion. In May, check out the Comme des Garçons exhibit, which “will examine the work of Japanese fashion designer Rei Kawakubo, known for her avant-garde designs and ability to challenge conventional notions of beauty, good taste, and fashionability.”

No need to fly halfway across the world to see these bad boys

For the history buff: The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Age of Empires: Chinese Art of the Qin and Han Dynasties

Through July 16: FREE

The Qin and Han dynasties witnessed the formation of the Chinese identity, consolidating the language, artistic traditions, and many of the values still present in Chinese society today. Here’s your chance to see some of the famed Xi’an terracotta warriors, as well as some works of art that have never before been displayed in the United States. Bwoggers who have been to this exhibit give the experience a 10/10.

For the activist: Whitney Museum of American Art: The 2017 Whitney Biennial

Through June 11: $17

Every two years, the Whitney Museum puts on an exhibition that highlights the current state of American art. This year’s biennial is especially poignant, as it “arrives at a time rife with racial tensions, economic inequities, and polarizing politics. Throughout the exhibition, artists challenge us to consider how these realities affect our senses of self and community.”

Click for Helen Frankenthaler and Joan Miró

Apr

22

Written by

Bwog will be there. Will you?

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

Monday, April 24th

Wednesday, April 26th

  • Midday Music featuring Alec Hon and Dean Deng, cello and piano duo, 12:00 PM, Garden Room 2 at Faculty House – Alec Hon and Dean Deng will be performing a program D. Shostakovich: Sonata for Cello and Piano in d minor, Op. 40S and Prokofiev: Sonata for Cello and Piano on C Major, Op. 119 – Free and open to the public
  • Marco Fusi: violin, viola, viola d’amore, 7:00 PM, The Italian Academy – “Marco Fusi is an Italian violinist and violist and a passionate advocate for the music of our time. Among many collaborations with established and emerging composers, he has recently premiered works by Billone, Scelsi, Sciarrino, Eötvös, Cendo, and Ferneyhough.” – Free and open to the public
  • Klezmer Ensemble: Spring Concert 2017, 8:00 PM, 112 Dodge Hall – Free and open to the public

(more…)

Apr

22

Written by

make everyone jealous by walking into class with this fabulous drink

Happening in the United States: The University of California, Berkeley reversed its decision to ban conservative author Ann Coulter from speaking on campus, rescheduling her talk on campus in early May. (The New York Times)

Happening in New York City: Check out the Met’s latest exhibition: The Age of Empires. Explore artwork from ancient China (Qin and Han dynasties), including various terracotta warriors and other treasures never before exhibited in the United States. (The Metropolitan Museum of Art)

Happening Near Campus: Celebrate Earth Day by participating in the March for Science between 10:30am and 4pm at 64th and Central Park West.

Overheard: “If I started a fraternity, it’d be Eta Omicron Epsilon. HOE for short.”

Treat Yourself: Wondering about all the hype surrounding the Unicorn Frappuccino at Starbucks? Check out this Buzzfeed video to learn more about this beverage.

Unicorn frappuccino via news.starbucks.com

Apr

21

Written by

No guarantees MoHi spicy tuna rolls actually look like this

Like off-brand toilet paper and the John Jay rice bowls, spicy tuna rolls are really hit or miss. If you get one from the right place, they can serve as a perfect deli lunch, but if you hit up the wrong joint, they can also serve as a perfect disappointment. Bwog Bagel Amara presents you with a guide to MoHi deli tuna rolls. 

I’ve been you before. Your class releases at 2:25 but your recitation starts at 3, which is just not enough time for a sit-down lunch. You want to grab a quick sushi roll but you don’t want it to be nasty… where should you go?

1. Milano (<$8): Milano has very fresh ingredients and makes their rolls fresh throughout the afternoon. This means the rice will be pretty soft (not like refrigerator crunchy), and the spicy mayo they put on top has little red flakes in it. They don’t make the sushi extra spicy or anything, but they look hardcore.

2. Appletree (<$7): I honestly want to give Appletree the award for best deli in Morningside. Even though it’s a few blocks deep, their ingredients are really fresh and tasty. At first, I thought only their sandwiches were good, but then I learned their spicy tuna rolls are super good too! The rice is a little harder because they leave it in the fridge for longer, but it’s still super good. Definitely worth the hike; also pick up a cantaloupe cup (they sell one of the best in MoHi as well).

3. Morton Williams (<$8) (but only before 6pm): I know what you’re thinking– can Morton Williams do anything right, other than being overpriced and open 24 hours? Yes. When the sushi chef is there, the rolls are actually pretty quality. The tuna is a little spicier than the others, so if you’re looking for a kick, head to 116th!

spicy tuna rollage via stu_spivack on Flickr

Apr

21

Written by

Uh, I love voting

Finally, after endless Facebook posts and candidates sliding into your DMs, the Spring 2017 CCSC Election has ended, and here are the results:

Senate: Omar Khan

Executive Board:

President: Nathan Rosin (Alliance)
VP of Policy: Nicole Allicock (Alliance)
VP of Finance: Adam Resheff (Low Beach Party)
VP of Communications: Sreya Pinnamaneni (Alliance)
VP of Campus Life: Alex Cedar (Alliance)

Your new At-Large Reps and Class Councils under the cut

Apr

21

Written by

The four senior Directing theses

Four Theater majors are presenting their senior theses for the first of two installments of Barnard’s Senior Thesis Festival 2017. One of these theses is centered on Eugene Ionesco’s The Bald Soprano. There will be another showing of The Bald Soprano tonight at 8 pm in the Minor Latham Playhouse in Milbank Hall, Room 118. Admission is free. Bwog Staffer Gloriana Lopez reviews the performance. 

The Bald Soprano is a play by French-Romanian author Eugene Ionesco, in which Director Brittany Searles (BC’ 17) and Set Designer Ruth Hollander (GS/JTS ’17) presented their thesis. Part of the Theater of the Absurd, this play is full of witty commentary on the banality and senselessness of life (quite fitting for Columbia I must admit). Instead of the usual setting in London, England, the production team decided to set the play in the suburbs of Washington D.C. also updating certain aspects of the plot to the 21st century.

The play begins with Mr. Smith (James Ritchie CC’20) and Mrs. Smith (Bailey Coleman BC’19) sitting in their living room, which is covered in clocks. Mrs. Smith talks incessantly about the events that transpired during the evening (although Mr. Smith was also there), while Mr. Smith reads the newspaper. Then, their maid Mary (Madeleine Williams BC ’20) announces that their friends the Martins are waiting on the door. As Mr. and Mrs. Smith change their clothes to welcome the couple, Mr. Martin (Jackson Welles SEAS ’19) and Mrs. Martin (Angelique Nicole Dudley GS ’19) talk to each other as if they just had met and start revealing information that allows them to conclude that they are in fact married.  However, Mary comes in to let the audience know that Mrs. Martin’s and Mr. Martin’s daughters have a red eye and a white eye in different positions.

What happened next, and what did Bwog think about all this?

Apr

21

Written by

Peter and Jerry, deep into their stressing and illuminating conversation.

In another foray into theatre, Internal Editor Finn Klauber attended the performance of three one-act plays written by playwright Edward Albee. Through the absurdity and confusion, he managed to pick up on some essential thematic substance at the core of performance. 

At no point in the CU Players production of “Both Houses, a Plague” did I ever lose a deep seated sense of bewilderment. The play, an adaptation of three one-act performances penned by American playwright Edward Albee, consistently seemed to mock the dramatic structures integral to theatrical performance, juxtaposing the absurdity of plotlessness with dialectics on meaning and purpose. Though the three acts were connected theatrically by Director William Sydney (CC ’19), whether through the manipulation of theatrical space or unstated thematic links, the pure absurdity of the performance in some parts muddled the deeper meaning—if such meaning even exists.

It’s simple to recount and summarize the plot elements present in the three acts, despite this. In the first act, “The Sandbox,” Mommy, played by Ariana Busby (BC ’18), and Daddy, played by Rowan Hepps Keeney (CC ’20), set down the doddering and seemingly senile Grandma, Mommy’s mother played by Lily Whiteman (CC ’19), in an onstage sandbox. A shirtless Young Man, Spencer Tilghman (CC ’20), performs vaguely wing-like calisthenics while standing rooted in place above her, and a Musician, Olivia Loomis (BC ’19), plays a cello softly. The brunt of the act seems to concern Mommy and Daddy grappling with some unstated but critical decision, while Grandma addresses the audience and flirts with the Young Man. After a night has passed, Mommy and Daddy are spiritually rejuvenated, and they leave the decrepit Grandma in the sandbox. In opposition to the Young Man’s prior confusion over his name and purpose in this performance—a meta conflation of the dramatic performance with the reality of the play—he now leans down, realizing he is the Angel of Death, and takes Grandma away.

Peter and Jerry are up next

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