Sep

27

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No crosswalks in sight!!

Though some Columbia students avoid going to Claremont at all costs, one Bwogger and 47 Claremont resident has to cross the street every day to get home…and there are no crosswalks.

Claremont Avenue runs only 11 blocks (from 116th Street to Tiemann Place), and it completely lacks crosswalks. Though Google Maps shows crosswalks at 120th and 122nd, they seem to have since been paved over, and the new pavement creates another concern, too–that cars can drive faster down the street more easily (without the fear of potholes).

For residents of 47 Claremont and Elliot, the main concerns are the intersections of 116th and Claremont and 119th and Claremont (where students must cross over to enter Barnard’s campus). Claremont is always lined with cars (as most NYC streets are), but due to the construction on Barnard’s campus and the delivery entrance right by the Claremont entrance to Barnard, the street is also often doubly lined with bulky vans and trucks that are difficult to peek around when trying to look both ways before crossing the street.

While Claremont is obviously not as busy as Broadway or Amsterdam, we’re still convinced that we’re going to be walking back from 1020 (or, God forbid, Butler) some weekend night and get hit by the Uber of someone who didn’t feel like trekking back from Mel’s.

Check out the crosswalk-less street for yourself:

 

Sep

27

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Dolla dolla dsp-olla bills y'all.

Dolla dolla dsp-olla bills y’all.

This week’s SGA meeting as all about the Benjamins, as many aspects of the discussion had to do with money. Instead of indulging in the first 2016 Presidential Debate, Staff Writer Dassi Karp attended the meeting and left with one thing on her mind: BBHMM!

Last night, a strong and smart woman took to the political stage to discuss her plans for the future. She calmly and politely presented her goals and her past accomplishments, responding to questions with poise.
That woman, of course, was the bold Barnard College president Debora Spar. And she had a lot to say at the most recent SGA meeting.

She started by describing the new program being put together by senior staff and president’s office called Barnard 101. This will be a forty-five minutes to one hour training module about how the college actually runs. It includes information about how it is funded, who makes what decisions, and how they create the processes to make these decisions. This will be helpful both to students interested in understanding “how this place operates,” and even to new trustees who are new to the ins and outs of college administration. “We’re not a business,” Spar emphasized, “but we also don’t run like your local elementary school.”

Open your hearts and wallets after the jump

Sep

27

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ESC gets an award this week for transparency.

ESC gets an award this week for transparency.

While most politically aware members of the Columbia community watched and/or drank to the Presidential Debate last night, ESC took time away from the hustle and bustle of watching [insert your preferred candidate here] succeed and [insert your undesirable candidate here] fail to discuss a variety of topics. Although a number of members seemed to persistently glance at their phones (I can’t blame them—both your humble ESC correspondent and Spec’s reporter had the livestream running in parallel to the meeting), ESC made headway on growing relationships between the undergraduate colleges and the administration while determining how to proceed with ESC special elections.

In terms of maintaining whatever modicum of school spirit exists at Columbia, ESC is moving into ‘Homecoming mode’. Columbia’s Homecoming game against Dartmouth on the 17th will be preceded by a cosponsored prep rally on Low Plaza the day before. At the event itself, ESC will be dispersing “giveaways” to engineers. Furthermore, members of ESC met with administrators under the purview of Suzanne Goldberg (who holds the Executive Vice Presidentship for University Life among other titles) to discuss facilitating the growth of a community spirit among all of Columbia—including faculty, administration, alumni, and graduate students. The primary concern of ESC is that events such as Homecoming and the Tree Lighting Ceremony are funded by the undergraduate councils while these events, in reality and in practice, serve all members of the Columbia community. In classic Columbia fashion, administration responded that, while the administration would be happy to selectively provide certain services or amenities for these events, they are hesitant to give direct funding to the event or to the councils. But, hey, they might throw in a bouncy castle for Homecoming. Behold the process of the carrot and stick approach.

We talk about PrezBo in this articel (WOW!)

Sep

27

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Trump once again proved self control is so overrated (Source: southpark.cc.com)

Trump once again proved self control is so overrated!

No,  that wasn’t an episode of South Park you tuned into on CNN last night. Regardless of whether you participated in a drinking game for last night’s debate, you all woke up with some type of headache. Between Trump’s repetitive, juvenile jabs and Hillary’s uncomfortable, forced laughter, I can assure you the debate did not do any wonders to ease your nerves. Tip: go to Cafe 212 and indulge in some Jacques Torres sorbet. (CNN)

In surprisingly crazier news, two actors in England got stopped by the police due to being mistaken as zombies. Officers from the North West Police Group stopped two extras for an unidentified TV show or movie due to reports by concerned drivers. England’s problems seem so quaint; maybe, we shouldn’t have broken off. (The Huffington Post)

In other news, a Columbia student has been reported to have ordered an Uber from DSig to McBain Hall this past Saturday. In case you are not familiar with the distance, it is quite literally three yards away. Not so shockingly, we have dropped one place on the USNWR National University rankings. (Patch)

In a bizarre chain of events, Woody Allen’s Amazon television series featuring Miley Cyrus has materialized. Tune in on Friday, September 30, 2016, to see Miley Cyrus grind up on someone more than ten years her senior. Robin Thicke, it’s not your (premiere) party but you can cry if you want to. (Hollywood Reporter)

Sep

26

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Be ready for this to be on every social media timeline every for the next two months

Be ready for this to be on every social media timeline every for the next two months

September is almost gone, and while we want to be done with school, we’re just getting started with fall! We can’t wait to itch in our flannels at our losing homecoming game and slowly never leave our rooms until April. This weekend was a great way to kick that off… 

Poppin’ Off

  • Went out with straight hair. Came home with curly hair.
  • Was abandoned by my “friend” in butler on Saturday at 1 AM.
  • Friend and I realized we were by far the least well-dressed people at a Shabbat dinner we got dragged to, and snuck out.
  • Acquired half a Nalgene of sangria early in the afternoon on Saturday; watered it down and proceeded to drink it throughout the afternoon as preparation for ~social events~ that night; wondered if this is how my descent into alcoholism begins.
  • Won an imaginary point by winning a tug of war.
  • Went biking in Riverside Park using Zagster bikes. 10/10 would recommend to a friend.
  • Met a boy who’s pretty wonderful, but we share the same astrological sign, so it’s probably doomed.
  • Went on a boat field trip for Environmental Science and very nearly fell into the Hudson River.
  • Went to World Leader Forum on Friday, couldn’t hear clearly what the president of the republic of Costa Rica, so basically went to an event from 11:30 to 12:30 just to fan myself with my laptop sleeve because there was no AC in Low.
  • Finished Gilmore Girls for the first time, took around five minutes to reflect, and immediately started The West Wing.
  • Carried my computer around midtown for four hours and didn’t end up using it once.
  • Heard two guys singing the “Caillou” theme song when walking home from a cancelled recitation on Saturday morning.
  • Succumbed to my roommate’s persistent coercion to try out Tae Kwon Do for the first time, even though I have no history of doing any kind of athletic activity ever in my life. Ended up saying “yes” to both joining the club and competing in the first tournament at MIT this October!
  • Tried to make a police officer laugh at Global Citizens by offering him a bagel and hymn to Apollo. Ended up getting searched instead.

Any blumpkins?

Sep

26

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Us being dramatic when wasted after watching the debate

We at Bwog don’t always do our homework, but last week our Irish lit professor implored us to watch the debate “hopefully with a drink in hand”…so how could we resist? Here’s a quick guide on where to watch and what to drink.

The Watching Parties:

You have two options that both sound semi-annoying:

  • CU Dems is hosting a party called “Ooooh Hill ‘Em” in Hamilton 517. The event name makes us want to perish, and they don’t seem to be providing any snacks–we say only go if you’re desperate.
  • The Political Science Students Association and the Columbia University College Republicans are co-hosting their own watch party (that doesn’t have an annoying name) in the Lerner Piano Lounge. The event description promises pizza, and although CUCR has not yet gotten back to us about the kind, they served V&T at their last event. Professor Michael Miller’s ego will also be giving “live commentary.”

Otherwise, multiple channels are livestreaming the debate. Here’s the link to Twitter’s livestream, for example. Enjoy watching from the comfort of Ref Room or your tiny single.

The Beverages:

Don’t get fancy with this. No need for drinking games! We suppose that you could go patriotic with some American beer, but any sort of 40 or tall boy will do. We currently have two Lime-a-Ritas sloshing around in our backpack that we’ll be drinking in a Butler red zone come 9:00pm. The key is to just keep sipping!

Sep

26

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CCSC knocks down all the administrative pins

CCSC knocks down all the administrative pins

CCSC got down to business right away in their meeting last night, going over their budget as well as bylaw adjustments. New Bureau Chief Tamara Barriot was on hand to record the quickly-moving discussion.

Upon returning from the Student Council and Governing Board Retreat this past weekend, Columbia College Student Council had nothing but business on the agenda. The main topic of the meeting was the Funding recap, presented by Finance VP Anuj Sharma, followed by voting on the constitutional bylaws and weekly updates by each of the council members.

Finance VP Anuj Sharma presented the distribution of CCSC’s operating budget this year: $1,045,702. The first 14% goes towards internal spending, which refers to all spendings on class councils, campus life and Senior Week. The next 20% will be spent on external funds, which for the most part comprises security and facilities fees that cover all student events organized outside of Lerner Hall. And finally, the last 66% goes towards the governing board, which includes: the Activities Board at Columbia, Bacchanal, Student Governing Board, Club, Sports Governing Board, Inter-Greek Council, and Community Impact.

CCSC’s operating budget comes directly from the student activities fees and surplus from the previous governing body; the budget this year has the possibility of being about $15,000. Sharma took the opportunity of the debatable $15,000 surplus to present Funding at Columbia (F@CU) initiatives for this year, which will include a better determination of surpluses, and where exactly they should be considered, as well as improvements on the velocity of allocating money by cutting the time of deliberations.

Bylaws and more updates after the jump

Sep

26

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Top of the class, bottom of the food chain

Top of the class, bottom of the food chain

Food insecurity became a big issue on campus back in 2015, but its prominence on the activism scene has since diminished–Senior Staff Writer Ross Chapman checked in on the progress of various student groups that have been working to combat hunger within the student body.

2015 was a year of hope for food insecurity on campus. The First-Generation Low-Income Partnership (FLIP) launched their Class Confessions Facebook page in March, putting pressure on the administration and student council to deal with the pressing concerns of their student body. CCSC, ESC, and GSC came together to create initiatives to combat the issue. FLIP raised over $6,000 to supply for low-income student needs. In fact, the term “food insecurity” only became tags on Bwog and the Columbia Spectator in 2015, to give a hint as to how important the year was for making Columbia aware of the issue. But as the year faded into the past, so too did the enthusiasm of the student body.

Last September, Ben Makansi and Viv Ramakrishnan spearheaded an effort to fight food insecurity. Bwog reached out to CCSC’s former President and VP of Policy to learn more about their programs and purposes. In our 2015 evaluation, we saw these short-term solutions as intermittently helpful if enough Columbia students participated. A year later, we can conclude that the efforts have had minimal effects.

So what happened to swipes?

Sep

26

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Fearless and Factless

Fearless and Factless

The Trump campaign has announced that it is not the job of the debate moderator to actually check facts that the candidates argue. Basically, Trump can now say anything he wants and it’s alright….yea, that’s going to look more like a Telemundo show than a debate. (The Huffington Post)

The illustrious President Spar wrote an article recently describing what the importance of ageism and beauty standards women face (at all ages, really) comes across as a bit confusing as it seems D-Spar falls a bit short of publishing a “Dear Diary” piece instead. (The New York Times)

Kim Kardashian says she will vote for Hillary Clinton after speaking with Caitlyn Jenner, who will be voting for Trump, and decided she aligned her ideals with Clinton’s camp. Clinton’s polling numbers are sure to now go up as a Kardashian supports a candidate, who low America has fallen. (The Washington Post)

Why so serious, Mr. Trump? via Associated Press

Sep

25

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You after your midterms.

You after your midterms.

If you didn’t read our post heralding the arrival of Autumn yesterday, this question might serve as a seasonal shock. Well, it might serve as a shock, regardless. Fall color, after all, is so blasé—just like all the people responding “pumpkin spice”. There’s no other way to describe the complete and utter dominance of consumerism in our “culture”.

Outside Butler

“Pumpkin spice lube.”

“No.”

“Menthol.”

Butler Cafe

“McDonald’s apple pie. Oh, and hotdogs.”

“Salted caramel.”

“SAGE!”

“You guys are all naming scents. Mine? Mine is cinnamon.”

“Apple cider mimosa.”

“Flavor? Hmmmm those new Starbucks flavors are good.”

“A chili vodka margarita I had the other night.”

More sensual flavours after the jump

Sep

25

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Dark wings, dark words.

Dark wings, dark words.

Bucket List represents the intellectual privilege we enjoy as Columbia students. We do our very best to bring to your attention important guest lecturers and special events on campus. Our recommendations for this week are below, and the full list is after the jump. If you notice any events that have been left off the list, or a correction, please leave them in the comments.

Recommended

  • “Distinguished Lectures in Computer Science: The Future of Cybersecurity” Monday, 11:30 AM – 12:00 PM, Davis Auditorium, Schapiro Hall (CEPSR). Dan Geer, In-Q-Tel.
  • “Remember Freedom Summer” Wednesday, 6:00-8:00 PM, Low Library Rotunda. Robert Moses, Rev. Calvin Butts, Karen Narasaki, Ester Fuchs.
  • “Decision 2016: The Battle for the Latino Vote” Thursday, 8:00 AM – 2:00 PM, Pulitzer Hall Lecture Hall. Maria Celeste Arraras, Jose Diaz-Balart, Steve Coll, Chuck Todd (RSVP).
  • “Ultraparameterization: Using large eddy simulation for global simulation of boundary layer clouds and climate” Thursday, 2:45-3:45 PM, Mudd Hall 214. Chris Bretherton.

Freedom reigns if you read more

Sep

25

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"Tell me where it says I can't get lit, Rabbi."

“Tell me where it says I can’t get lit, Rabbi.”d

Somebody famous once said “For six days, work is to be done, but the seventh day shall be your holy day, a day of sabbath rest”. We here at Bwog agree wholeheartedly, and not just because we follow all 10 or 613 or whatever number of commandments govern our lives—not that we even consistently follow any religious strictures. Our nights at 1020 give record to that….

But we do think a day away from work and stress is a good thing. And given the stress knot forming in the American Ship of State’s rigging due to tomorrow’s Presidential Debate, we think such a great idea has never been more important. So we’re here, for you, at Lerner 505 starting at 7:00 PM for some good old fashioned, Symposium-esque activities and celebrations. It’s gonna be a mirthful time.

Lighting up via Nacsama / Public Domain

Sep

25

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We at Columbia know a little bit about horses and traps, don't we?

We at Columbia know a little bit about horses and traps, don’t we?

Broken

The latest iteration of a ceasefire to the Syrian conflict fell apart, again, this week. After “accidental” bombings by the American Air Force, a successful thrust at ISIS’ last major position in Iraq, and the alleged use of chemical weapons, this oft-troubled region is sinking back into despair. (NBC)

Restored

Yesterday, the National Museum of African American History and Cultured opened on the last available spot in Washington D.C.’s National Mall. Presenting the dramatic story of African American history, the Museum is a beacon of peace and accomplishment in such a troubled time. (CNN)

Broken

Russia once again granted Vladimir Putin’s party to control of the Duma among low voter turnout and accusations of election fraud. Despite winning close to half the votes, Russia’s broken governing structure awarded Putin’s United Russia almost three quarters of Parliamentary seats. (WSJ)

Restored

A horse from Flagler County, Florida, was restored to her family after falling into a septic tank. Mercy, a 24 year old mare, was lifted from the tank after 2 hours of work by a veterinary response team and fretting by her friend and owner. Sometimes, it’s the smallest joys which mean the most. (CNN)

Sep

24

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low it's fall

Sure, the Official First Day of Fall was on Thursday, but the oppressive heat has finally broken (and it probably won’t be hot again for the rest of the school year). Temperatures will be in the mid-60s for the next 10 days, though it is supposed to rain a lot, so enjoy the cool in sunlight while you can.

Sep

24

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This is how people Netflix and chill at EC, right?

What would you rather do: “Netflix and Chill” or go to a filmmaking lecture about a Netflix show?

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/ theatrically-inclined on campus.

Tuesday, September 27th

  • The Challenge to Avert Tragedy: “The Winter’s Tale” Refigured in “Vertigo,” “Phoenix,” & “Gone Girl”, 6 PM, 328 Milbank Hall – “Join cultural critic Elisabeth Bronfen as she takes us on a journey from Renaissance literature through contemporary cinema to explore the aesthetic and philosophical import of this mysteriously powerful literary trope of the dead woman’s return. Professor Bronfen, of the University of Zurich and New York University, is the author of the groundbreaking Over Her Dead Body: Death, Femininity, and the Aesthetic and, most recently, Mad Men, Death, and the American Dream.” – Free

The rest of the week is here

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