Sep

25

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Ahh!!

One Bwogger loves Ferris more than she loves herself, but has felt a bit isolated since school started…

I’ve been a Ferris girl since day one. Upon arriving on Barnard’s campus, Hewitt’s difficult pizza and tough chicken quickly sent me across Broadway to explore a broader canvas. After going back and forth between John Jay and Ferris (the Barnard-JJ’s cold war didn’t end until my sophomore year), my heart was eventually captured by the all-afternoon breakfast, panini press, and occasional fish taco. Ferris was my baby, my boo, my shawty, my everything. In its highest moments (hosting Bwog to DJ) and in its lowest (Banana-Gate Spring 2017), the friendly staff and diverse food options have kept me coming back, questionable guacamole and all.

So you could imagine my surprise when I returned to the omelet-mecca to find probably the scariest and most violating installation parked in front of the door. Standing there, in all black, was…. a person?? To be clear, this person was not doing anything additional to appear more intimidating than she already was. In fact, she seemed nice, smiling at students as they passed. But I think my unsuccessful freshman nights downtown had hard-wired my brain to fear anyone in all black standing outside of somewhere I want to go. Whenever I see her, in my head I hear, “is this a real ID?” “what’s your address?” “my buddy over there is a COP should I have him run it?” A cold chill travels down my spine. An eerie feeling. I instinctively suggest we find some dollar pizza and get an uber before realizing we are literally at Ferris Booth Commons, my student ID is not getting rejected in fucking Lerner, and that everything is going to be OK.

But what’s the deal, Ferris? This bouncer is pretty scary and reminds me of a tough night in Hell’s Kitchen. I don’t know how much more carrot sushi I can eat at John Jay, but it certainly doesn’t feel as scary as walking past the girl in Lerner.

Yes the ID is real via Public Domain

Sep

25

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Sunday nights are always a good time with the CCSC crew – last night was no different. Bwogger Nadia Rahman reports back from the Satow Room on CCSC happenings, from dinner to elections.  

Freshman CCSC elections are among us, meaning your Facebook is probably spammed with false promises and oddly professional photoshoots of candidates.

Last night’s CCSC meeting (the second of the year) was dominated by logistical concerns, snappy retorts, and our favorite topic—bylaw review. If you don’t love motions within motions, why are you reading this?

Friend2Friend & A Cute Dinner

President Nathan Rosin introduced “Friend2Friend,” a recently-developed three hour training on recognizing and responding to classmates’ signs of distress. According to Rosin, Alice! had offered to facilitate a training for CCSC members, given adequate attendance. By and large, the response to this offer was positive. 2020 VP James Ritchie claimed not doing the training would be “disingenuous,” as several members had campaigned on issues surrounding mental health advocacy and awareness, adding, “This is the easiest thing that we could do and also the least effort thing that we could do.”

Cementing friendships & fulfilling campaign promises, 2together

Sep

25

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Extreme heat, humidity, and Trump: the worst combination

Happening Around The World: Angela Merkel wins her fourth term as German chancellor, a feat for her party’s platform. This victory was overshadowed by the fact that Alternative for Democracy, a nationalist party, ended up winning the most chairs in their history and became the third largest group in parliament, a factor that allows for far-right politicians (yikes) to have more power. (BBC)

Happening In The US: Donald Trump proposed a third resolution to his previously-failed Travel Ban, this time including North Korea, Chad and Venezuela, countries that have already been screwed over by previous presidencies. Now fully included on the list are Iran, Libya, Syria, Yemen, Somalia, Chad and North Korea; Venezuela, while still included the ban, only restricts government officials and their families. (NY Times)

Happening in NYC: Chances are if you weren’t lying in your bed hungover and walked more than 10 feet outside yesterday, you may have noticed it was hot as hell. Scientists confirmed, in fact, that it was hot – so hot that Central Park broke its record for the highest temperature on the first weekend of fall, reaching a peak of 91°F/32°C in the afternoon. (NBC)

Happening At Columbia: Interested in hearing about the relationship between art and current events? “Here/Say: Framing, Part 1 [Classification]” is happening TODAY at 7:00-8:30 PM in the Diana Center. Come listen to curator Jacqueline Mabey and artist Joiri Minaya in the first session of their series!

Overseen(?) at Columbia: On the John Jay 10 Lounge whiteboard, there is a running tally for the “times Lola says STFU.” There are 63 tallies. We feel you, Lola.

 

Sep

24

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In Bwog Video’s second release—or is it “Bwideo” now?—Camille Ramos (’20) and Sarah Kinney (’20) ask Columbia trivia to unsuspecting students on College Walk. We thought it was hard to trump our first video, but we sure proved ourselves wrong! Ahem…gratuitous self praise notwithstanding, check out our new video below! If you’re interested in Bwog Video/Bwideo, come to one of our meetings at 9:00 PM on Sundays in Lerner 510.

Video via Camille Ramos and Bwog

Sep

24

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What this writer hopes not to look like in Cell Bio tomorrow morning

It’s 8:38 on Monday morning. You roll into your 8:40 lecture, slump into a seat, and lean over your desk, a weight stronger than gravity pulling your eyelids down. It’s too early for this. It’s too early for anything. But you’re gonna be tested on this material in in a few short weeks, so you need to at least take some notes. How do you fight the urge to nap through class? Senior staffer Betsy Ladyzhets has some suggestions.

  • Make coffee the night before: This is a simple but elegant fix. Make your coffee before you go to bed, stick it in the fridge overnight, then chug it right before you head out the door the next morning. If you’re a first-year without a coffeemaker, do this with a cup of coffee taken from the dining hall. For an extra boost, add something special to the coffee.
  • Bring snacks: It’s pretty much impossible to finish a full breakfast before an 8:40, so bring your breakfast with you! Whether your sustenance of choice is granola bars, bagels, or oranges, taking a couple bites every few minutes will keep you motivated. (If you are bringing oranges, though, make sure you have some paper towels.)
  • Psychoanalyze your professor’s clothing choices, body language, etc.: Why is he wearing an orange Hawaiian shirt? Does the placement of her hands on her hips mean that this is going to be on the midterm? Are clues to his marital status hidden in his chalk handwriting? Professors are full of clues, and it could take you a full hour and fifteen minutes to decode them.
  • Challenge yourself to take the best possible notes: Maybe it’s not necessary to meticulously recreate every single diagram on the powerpoint or every word that comes out of your professor’s mouth, but trying your best to do so will help give you incentive to keep from dozing off.

More advice after the jump

Sep

24

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Literally us praying for our tests tomorrow.

Look, we know you think you don’t need any absolution for the various things you got up to this weekend. Whether you were drinking champagne at a frat party or blazing in Brooklyn, there are definitely things you need to get off your chest. Sorta like going to confession.

We were going to put in some nice Bible selections to emphasize just how much you need to come to Lerner 510 at 9:00 PM tonight, but that isn’t really necessary at this point. You know you need to absolve your sins in a sweet release of gossip, discussion, and Trader Joe’s snacks. Bwog can only help those who help themselves.

Sep

24

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We are the Uber Mensch.

Bucket List represents the intellectual privilege we enjoy as Columbia students. We do our very best to bring to your attention important guest lecturers and special events on campus. Our recommendations for this week are below, and the full list is after the jump. If you notice any events that have been left off the list, or if you have a correction, please let us know in the comments.

Recommended

  • “Here/Say: Framing, Part 1 [Classification]” Monday, September 25, 7:00 – 8:30 pm. The Diana Center.
  • “Power Talk with Athena Distinguished Fellow Kavita Ramdas” Tuesday, September 25, 7:00 – 8:30 pm. Barnard Hall, Room 304.
  • “White Nationalism and Misogyny: The Intersection of Hate” Wednesday, September 27, 6:30 pm. Columbia Law School, Jerome Greene Hall.
  • “Berlin Calling: A Story of Anarchy, Music, the Wall, and the Birth” Thursday, September 28, 8:00 pm. Deutsches Haus.
  • “David Brown: A People-Centered Preservation Movement” Thursday, September 28, 7:00 pm. Ware Lounge, Avery Hall.

More things on Israel and other fun events

Sep

24

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An annotated page from The Beauty Myth, featuring two large question marks around a central passage.

“??” (Click to enlarge)

Published in 1991, The Beauty Myth by Naomi Wolf discusses the societal pressures women face and the drastically negative effects those pressures create. These copies, originally housed in Barnard’s library, have found a temporary home on the fourth floor of Butler. Although we can only surmise that their weathered appearance comes from years of loving use by Barnard women, we’re interested in what Columbia and Barnard students alike have been writing in them. Staff Writers Maggie Moran and Abby Rubel schlepped over to Butler on a Saturday to take a look.

The vast majority of the annotations we found were in the opening two chapters of the book. Maybe this is because teachers only tend to assign the beginning (which, based on the skimming we did, contains most of the book’s main ideas), or maybe because students only bothered to read the first little bit.

It was clear from the annotation styles, however, that some readers pushed all the way through, and it’s always refreshing to be able to follow a reader’s journey from confusion to understanding. In the book’s first chapter, the very definition of “the beauty myth” is marked with a simple “??”. But as the concept becomes clearer in the following pages, the underlining becomes more prolific, hopefully indicating that this reader found their answer.

Another reader deemed an entire paragraph to be of note; it describes the way women often size each other up, with “a quick up-and-down, curt and wary…the shoes, the muscle tone, the makeup, are noted accurately, but the eyes glance off one another.” The passage must have struck a chord by conjuring up memories of rush weeks’ past.

Next up: “Is she black? Why isn’t she in Connecticut?”

Sep

24

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Thanks Obama.

Happening Around The World: Germany is heading off a national election today. The main contenders are Merkel’s Christian Democrats, her coalition partner the Social Democrats, and the right-leaning Alternative for Democracy. Pray for your victor of choice. (BBC)

Happening In The US: NFL Commissioner, Roger Goodell, released a statement from the NFL to President Trump regarding the comments the President has made in relation to the NFL, ESPN, and the controversy surrounding Colin Kaepernick. Regardless of your position, let’s all pray for the continued existence of American Football. (BBC)

Happening In NYC: If you happened to be looking up at the sky yesterday in solemn prayer, you may have seen a civilian drone collide with a Black Hawk military helicopter. Okay, you probably didn’t see it happen, since it happened in Staten Island, but it’s still pretty interesting. Let’s just pray for Staten Island, regardless. (Gothamist)

Happening At ColumbiaHere’s a schedule for the church services occurring today in St. Paul’s. We know you’re in desperate need of some spiritual reflection, as well as atonement for your various weekend sins.

Overseen: Two girls in a passionate embrace, kissing in the walled-off eastern end of Ref Room in Butler. While we’re all for spontaneity in romance, keep your romantic activities out of our gloomy library rooms, you dang kids!

 

Sep

23

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During a symposium at the New York Botanical Garden last week, senior staffer Betsy Ladyzhets learned about an site that allows users to play with the environmental conditions of New York City, and she found it cool enough to share here.

Have you ever wondered what NYC looked like what the first Europeans landed here in 1609? Or are you perhaps interested in how NYC could look in the future, if our city follows the lead of other, more sustainable cities around the world and implements policies to combat climate change? If either of those questions appealed to you, Visionmaker NYC is probably your next procrastination device.

Visionmaker NYC is a site developed by the Welikia Project at the Wildlife Conservation Society (the nonprofit responsible for running the Bronx Zoo, as well as other research and conservation projects around the world). This team of researchers worked on collecting ecological information on the history of NYC, starting with Manhattan, then working outward to the other boroughs. This research has focused on the city’s biodiversity; the researchers hope to find out what NYC lacks in plant and animal communities, and what we could be doing better in order to preserve the wildlife in and around the city.

One major piece of the Welikia Project is public education – bringing the information that researchers have collected to non-scientists of NYC.  The Visionmaker site is a major part of that educational message: it allows users to explore the NYC of the past (“Welikia” means “my good home” in Lenape) and create their own visions for NYC of the future, by adjusting general lifestyles, precipitation levels, and other pieces of the wider NYC environment.

I spent some time playing around with the site today, particularly focusing in on Columbia – we’re (literally) greener than many other parts of the city, but we clearly still have a long way to go.

See some photos of Columbia’s terrain after the jump

Sep

23

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Dungeons, dragons, and coffee – oh my!

Seemingly overnight, a new board game café sprouted up next to the Heights. This establishment is a testament to opposites. It’s an odd, irreconcilable mix of hipster coffee and nerdy décor, of gift shop and cafe. We sent Bwog babies Jenny & Hyonju to check it out. 

Upon first entrance, we were greeted by a wall of neatly stacked, packaged board games available for purchase, which struck us as jarringly gift-shop-esque. Opposite of this wall was the coffee bar, in which customers could order a range of drinks and baked goods. One of us bought a medium iced coffee with milk, priced at $3.50, while the other took advantage of the free iced water dispenser – a polite gesture that we appreciated. It only got more interesting from here.

(more…)

Sep

23

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Get off campus this week! We believe in you!

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

On Campus: 

  • Monday night from 7 to 8:30, stop on by the Diana Center for Here/Say: Framing, Part 1 [Classification]. Here/Say is a conversation series where students can discuss the relationship between art and current events. This is the first discussion of the series.
  • Head on over to the Maison Française on Tuesday night for a screening and discussion of Façade: 209 rue Saint Maur. This film, directed by Ruth Zylberman, documents the lives of generations of tenants in the same apartment building.
  • Thursday night at 8 pm is the opening night of Bach + Glass at Miller Theatre. A Far Cry, an orchestra from Boston, will be playing the music of composer Philip Glass while accompanied by Simone Dinnerstein.

Off Campus: 

  • The Columbia Arts Initiative is launching a new series of events titled Columbia Nights. These sessions give Columbia students the chance to visit various art exhibits and plays across the city, then sit down with the artist themself after. The first event is M. Butterfly on October 19, but tickets go on sale starting this Friday at 1 pm at the TIC.
  • This Wednesday night is Tribeca Art & Culture Night, a community art festival that happens every season. Head on down (after you RSVP) and explore dozens of local artists and designers.
  • Rodin is at the Met! This special exhibit will be there throughout the end of the semester, but go visit sometime soon and enjoy the weather in Central Park. Bwog tip: take the 1 down to 86, stop at Milk Bar on Columbus and 87, then walk through Central Park and go to the Met.

Photo via Bwog Staff

Sep

23

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Bwog likes His Excellency’s enthusiasm!

Last week, a number of powerful world leaders flocked to Columbia’s campus to participate in the university’s annual World Leaders Forum. To continue our coverage of the Forum, we sent new staffer Megan Wylie to see the current president of Austria, Dr. Alexander Van der Bellen.

I went to His Excellency Dr. Alexander Van der Bellen’s speech for multiple reasons: I wanted to see PrezBo, to see something actually happen in Low, and to get free Columbia swag. I also went to hear the current President of the Republic of Austria discuss the current state of the European Union and the concept of togetherness in Europe today. According to a little Wikipedia research, President Bellen, a former member of the Green Party, made history when he defeated the far-right Freedom Party candidate, Norbert Hofer, by only 30,863 votes. While Hofer preached a message of European separatism, nativism and extreme nationalism, Bellen advocated for policies welcoming migrants and strengthening the bond between the European community.

(more…)

Sep

23

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what UP

Happening Around the World: Currently without power, a failing dam threatens Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria. (BBC)

Happening in the US: A 71-year-old man with a raccoon-hunting headlamp was arrested after police discovered 1,700 marijuana plants on his property. (USA Today)

Happening in NYC: The MTA started a program that allows those who are pregnant or disabled to wear a button asking for a seat. It has had some success, but riders for the most part just don’t know about it. (NY Times)

Happening on Campus: The first event for the Andrew W. Mellon Sawyer Seminar in Global Language Justice is tonight from 6pm-9pm. Call the ICLS for more details: 212-854-4541.

Overheard: “I’m going to name my daughter McChicken”

Sep

22

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Neon ceramic and roses

Because Morningside Heights is always busting with cool art events, we often forget that we live in a city that busts even further with art. Just a couple blocks north is the Studio Museum in Harlem, where new Bwogger Zoë and not-new bwogger Amara headed on Thursday night.

While most students make the rounds at the Met or the MoMA for ArtHum or to class up their Instagrams, the Studio Museum of Harlem gets a little less student attention. The museum is free for Columbia students, and also stays open a lot later than other museums – you can check it out until 9 p.m. on Thursdays and Fridays. And it’s on 125th, which is totally walkable from campus (or only a $3 UberPool, which is what we opted for). The current exhibitions are worth seeing, especially Their Own Harlems. A celebration of the centennial of Jacob Lawrence’s birth, the exhibit explores the impact of Harlem on a variety of artists. Some of the art, like Lawrence’s own tempera paintings, date back to the 1950s, but other pieces were created as recently as 2010. All of it drives home a central point too often neglected by Columbia students: that Harlem has long been and continues to be a source of artistic inspiration and cultural resources.
We came to see Their Own Harlems, but ended up checking out the rest of the museum as well.

Click for pics

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