May

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Lovely, power-hungry institution

Lovely, power-hungry institution

You’ve seen Yelp reviews of restaurants, bars, and maybe even some performance halls – but did you know that you can also review Columbia? This website is the last place you’d want to look for opinions when choosing which college to attend, but it is also, apparently, the best place for many to get out their frustration at this institution, as  one Bwogger discovered last week when procrastinating by scrolling through MoHi Yelp reviews. She decided to sort reviews of Columbia from lowest to highest, and discovered a treasure trove of disgruntled former students, community visitors, and friends from rival schools who thought Yelp was the best platform upon which to voice their  opinions.

You can try out our new favorite procrastination method for yourself here, or check out a few notable reviews that we’ve compiled below.

How much is tuition again?

Even more pseudonymous anger after the jump

May

1

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Ary_Scheffer_-_Orpheus_Mourning_the_Death_of_Eurydice,_1814

Bwog mourns the death/end of Columbia arts (until next semester!)

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/ theatrically-inclined on campus.

Monday, May 2

  • Bey-chantae, 9 PM, Glicker-Milstein Theatre in the Diana Center – Barnard’s Bacchantae is “treating you all to a very special Beyonce-themed performance, featuring a never-before-heard medley you won’t want to miss”

Wednesday, May 4

  • Elizabeth Weisser – Viola Music, 7:00 PM, Columbia Maison Française
 in Buell Hall – “Labeled “explosive” by Strad Magazine, new music champion Elizabeth Weisser . . .” will be performing a program consisting of Heinz Holliger Souvenirs Trémaësques (2000-01),Fausto Romitelli Ganimede (1986), Salvatore Sciarrino Tre Notturni Brillanti (1974-75), and JS Bach Partita No. 2 in minor bwv (1717-20).
  • Barnard + Columbia Architecture End of the Year Show – open reception and show, 6:0 PM, Louise McCagg ’59 Gallery and the 4th and 5th floors of the Diana Center – “Students enrolled in architecture studio and workshop courses exhibit their work. Guests are welcome. Opening Reception will be held on Wedneday, May 4, 2016 between in 6-7:30 PM in the Louise McCagg ’59 Gallery.” (This gallery runs until Wednesday, May 11th)

“Orpheus Mourning the Death of Eurydice” by Ary Scheffer [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

May

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Serpent's? Ecstasy?

Serpent’s? Ecstasy?

Bucket List represents the intellectual privilege we enjoy as Columbia students. We do our very best to bring to your attention important guest lecturers and special events on campus. Our recommendations for this week are below, and the full list is after the jump. If you notice any events that have been left off the list, or if you have a correction, please let us know in the comments.

Recommended

  • “Education and the Commercial Mindset” Monday, 7:00-8:30 PM, Milbank Chapel, Teachers College. Samuel E. Abrams,  Henry M. Levin,  Carol Burris, Sharif El-Mekki, Jeffrey R. Henig.
  • “Celebrating 100 Years of Jane Jacobs: Innovations in New York City’s Open Space” Tuesday, 9:00-10:30 AM, 1501 IAB. Leslie Koch, Regina Myer, Mitchell Silver (RSVP).
  • “LAGOS: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Space, Society, and the Imagination of an African Crossroad” 11:30 AM Friday – 7:30 PM Saturday, Barnard Hall (schedule here). Abosede George, Saheed Aderinto, Ademide Adelusi-Adeluyi (RSVP).

What events are this week?

May

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New SGA Prez, who dis?

Two weeks ago, hopeful candidates fought it out for a coveted position on Barnard’s SGA. This week, staff writer Raji Ganapathy sat down with the newly elected SGA President for 2016-2017, Sara Heiny, to hear about her plans for next year. Read on to hear what’s in store.

Bwog: Tell us a little bit about yourself, Sara!

Sara: So I am a rising senior (obviously, since you have to be to run for SGA President), majoring in English and minor in History with a concentration in Science, Technology and Environment. I’m from the Midwest (Indiana), but love living in New York City, mostly because I can walk everywhere and so the exploration never ends. I’m also a huge musical fan, so if you ever go to a CMTS performance you might find me playing cello in the pit orchestra. (This is where I shamelessly plug the Varsity Show – go see it!! It’s an inter-campus tradition and Barnard students abound on stage, in the plot, in the pit, behind the scenes, on the production team, you name it!)

B: Why did you first get involved with SGA?

S: Almost two years ago now, the administration started reviewing and revising the Nine Ways of Knowing. This type of all-out curriculum review only happens every fifteen years, so when they started soliciting opinions from the student body, I was curious. I became a regular attendee at the student open sessions, and was eventually invited to be a student representative and to help gather more input from the student body. As we began to implement this new curriculum (i.e. the Foundations), I applied for the Rep for Academic Affairs position in order be more involved in the process — and that’s kind of how I got involved with SGA.

TL;DR: SGA wasn’t something I knew I wanted to be involved with when I came to Barnard. But I got hooked on the opportunities to work with the administration and to represent something larger than myself (i.e. the student body).

B: What do you consider the most challenging aspect of the leadership process?

S: In the past, the most challenging aspect has been kind of two fold. On one hand, it’s sometimes difficult to get enough student participation, and then when we do, it can be difficult to make sure those voices are heard by the administration.

B: What accomplishments are you most proud of from your time in SGA?

May

1

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Stahp.

Stahp.

As it turns out, dogs hate getting hugs from humans. Sorry bout it. (NPR)

John Kasich announced at Friday’s forum that some people are “probably” born gay, saying, “I mean I don’t know how it will works, OK? I mean, look, are they? In all probability, they are. OK?” His response was met, understandably, with some confusion from the audience. (ABC)

Susan Sarandon, in an interview with Stephen Colbert, explained why she had to “break up with” Hillary Clinton. In the words of Sarandon, “”Who is this person, I can’t trust her.” Trouble in paradise… (CBS)

Karrine Steffans is claiming to be Becky with the good hair. The model spoke to the press about her “affair” with Jay Z – and by the press, we mean xoJane. (Jezebel)

Apr

30

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The House of Blue and White

The House of Blue and White

In the past few weeks revving up to finals, the number of open reservation slots of group study rooms in Butler, NoCo, and Lehman Social Sciences Library (yes, you can do that) have dwindled down to almost nothing. While most reservation titles are similarly sparse—think “study,” “finals,” “group project”—the increased pool of library dwellers and friend groups looking for a private study spaces have titled their library sojourns with unique names. Either that, or they’re delirious with studying. One or the other, right?

Below you’ll find pictures of reservations with either one-off or consistently unique names. All reservations for the week can be found here.

Sig Nu

What else is up?

Apr

30

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group1

V122 tries to reassure us that yes, we do actually belong at Columbia.

Arts Editor Gowan Moïse attended the 122nd Annual Varsity Show on opening night. Here is Bwog’s review of the production, as well as Moïse’s comments on the show.

Last night marked the opening night of a three day run of the 122nd Annual Varsity Show, co-written by Anika Benkov (CC ’16) and Michael Rodriguez (CC ’16) and directed by Jonah Weinsten (CC ’16), with lyrics and composition by Jake Chapman (CC ’16) and Sofia Geck (BC ’17). At the start of the performance, the curtains slowly opened to reveal four portraits of Columbia’s “founding fathers” Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, Robert Livingston, and King George II discussing their accomplishments and achievements while disparaging the current state of Columbia. The final lines delivered by the founding fathers in the first narrative scene give an ominous warning about  the show to follow: “This is a tale of tradition / at the school of white and blue / so watch if you dare, but just beware: / the past isn’t done with you!”

Following this warning and narrative opening, we’re immediately introduced to the main character, Jenny Park (April Cho, CC ’17), a first generation sophomore attempting to find some sense of belonging at Columbia. Even as she struggles to maintain order at her work-study job in Hartley, she expresses dreams of greatness and a desire to be like the notorious Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg (“Notorious”).

Don’t we all want to be like RBG?

Apr

30

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Deep in thought

Deep in thought

PrezBo began the last University Senate plenary of the year with a collection of remarks on current events.

On the passing of Bill Campbell

“There was no more dedicated alumn of Columbia than Bill,” said PrezBo about the long-time Columbia trustee who died recently. “He really knew how to make organizations work,” said PrezBo. “When it came to making things happen and protecting me and the institution, there was just nobody better.”

PrezBo attended a memorial service for Campbell on Monday in Palo Alto (Campbell was involved in Silicon Valley), and he asked for a moment of silence at the plenary.

On Manhattanville

“On May 2nd, I’ll send out a statement saying that on May 2nd 1896, Morningside Heights campus was dedicated, and we are now beginning the process of dedicating the new campus in Manhattanville, and this will go on all through next year, as we begin to move into the buildings,” said PrezBo about his Manhattanville plants.

The Mind, Brain, and Behavior Institute, the Lenfest Center for the Arts, and the forum building “will all be completed in the next year and a half,” according to PrezBo.

What about the freaking statue

Apr

30

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You better call Prezbo with the good hair

You better call Prezbo with the good hair

Any attempts at getting work done are again wrecked by another notable album release. Drake released his fourth studio album, Views, on Apple Music, yet again leaving us in our feelings for the weekend. (Billboard)

Loose alpaca in Massachusetts has been captured, still no word on who owns it.

Construction workers cleaning pipes in Spain accidentally discover 1,300 pounds of ancient Roman coins dating back as far as the third century. (Huffington Post)

After protests from students, Yale has decided not to rename Calhoun College, a residential college named after a pro-slavery senator. (USA Today)

Apr

29

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Well if it's cool enough to have its own geotag...

Well if it’s cool enough to have its own geotag…

Even with finals quickly approaching, Staff Writer and avid Shakespearian-theatergoer Jessa Nootbaar took a few hours out of her Thursday night to walk around Columbia, following KCST’s spring show production of “Macbeth.” Here are her thoughts on last night’s performance of the bloody rise and fall of the Scotsman himself.

Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” (or, “the Scottish play,” for those still too superstitious to say the name) is a classic story following the downfall of a man too ambitious and power-hungry for his own good. The play opens as the titular character, Macbeth, and his companion Banquo return from battle, where they stumble upon three witches, the Weird Sisters, who predict greatness and power for both Macbeth and Banquo’s sons. These predictions begin to come true as Macbeth is granted new titles of nobility, but he and his wife feel that they must take matters into their own hands to ensure that he will become king, as the witches divined. They murder King Duncan, thus beginning a string of bloody killings.

I had seen many renditions of the tragedy before last night, but KCST’s travelling play was a wholly new interpretation on the established classic. The audience began the night on Low Plaza but were led by the ensemble from location to location, where actors waited, illuminated in the night. The occasional student wandered into a scene, only to look up from their phone with an expression of total confusion, having found themselves surrounded by oddly-dressed students chanting and waving around metal pipes. The student would scurry away, and the audience would laugh. (As a note for students: should you run into “Macbeth” during tonight’s or tomorrow night’s performance, please be quiet and respectful as you pass by, as the actors do not have mics.) But how was the actual performance?

Apr

29

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“& swan song” will leave you emotionally breathless

Last night, dance-enthusiast and Staff Writer Jennie Nugent has the distinct pleasure of attending “& swan song,” a dance composition of five dancers produced through the CoLab Performing Arts Collective. Navigating the heavy emotional themes of the performance, here are Jennie’s thoughts on the dance.

After attending “& swan song” last night in the Glicker-Milstein Theatre, it took a while to sort through the emotions brought out by the evocative dance performance. The performance is described as looking at “violence and death as juxtaposed next to that of tenderness and intimacy,” and in its attempt to explore those weighty themes, the show completely delivered. The performers carefully treaded the line between brilliant and bizarre, and the performance called upon the audience to tap into their own experiences and emotions to engage with the themes of the dances.

Following the performance, the audience gave the performers a true standing ovation, and snippets of high praise were heard from the majority of the audience on their way out of the doors. Personally, I thought the performance was thoroughly fantastic, and I would highly recommend it to anyone willing to face some heavy themes and their own emotions. In order to help future viewers prepare for the ultra-modernism they are about to enjoy at this performance, I want to address four points regarding elements of the performance and how to get the most out of attending the show: So what are the four points?

Apr

29

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In an email from Dean Valentini, the university has just announced that Michael Pippenger, Dean of the Office of Global Programs, will be departing for a position at the University of Notre Dame. Pippenger originally came to Columbia College in 2006 as the Dean of Fellowship Programs, and later became the Dean of Undergraduate Global Programs in 2011. During his time at Columbia, his work focused on globalizing the Columbia experience as well as overseeing advising for fellowships.

More recently, the Office of Undergraduate Global Programs has been criticized for its alleged lack of support for students during the application process for prestigious fellowships, such as Rhodes Scholarships. The former head of the Fellowship Office, Paul Bohlmann, left Columbia in 2014, and Pippenger acknowledged in a 2014 meeting with CCSC that the office had been “chaotic” since then.

In his new role at Notre Dame, Peppinger will be doing similar work to continue the globalization of the university and to expose students to international experiences.

You can read the university’s full statement below:

Apr

29

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Just looking at these talented dancers makes us feel a little inadequate...

Just looking at these talented dancers makes us feel a little inadequate…

Last night, Staff Writer Becky Novik attended Onyx‘s spring showcase, and was blown away by the talent and energy of the performers. The group’s second performance is tonight at 8:30pm in the Lerner Black Box.

Long story short: I didn’t want it to end and was genuinely sad when it did.

And now the long story:

For their spring showcase, Onyx absolutely killed it with four unique sets of hip-hop dance filled with hair flips, sharp choreography, and thoroughly infectious energy.

Before any dancing started, the hosts of the evening, which included two Onyx dance troupe alumnae, instructed the audience to get as loud as they wanted to in support and appreciation for the dancers.  The second Onyx came on, it was clear that the audience didn’t need any encouragement to get loud for the performers.  The connection that the Onyx dancers made with an audience was, alone, more than enough to elicit screams and cheers. And then the dancing started.

Tell us more about that dancing though

Apr

29

Israel-Palestine Discourse smallDefining the Discourse
Analyzing Columbia’s most polarizing issue
by Yasemin Akçagüner

For the first time this year, Israeli Apartheid Week—organized by Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) and Jewish Voice for Peace (JVP)—was protested not just by pro-Israel students on campus, but also by a blow-up Pinocchio doll rumored to cost around $800.

IAW, as the organizers call it, has been an annual fixture since 2005, marked by heated op-eds in Spectator, scandals as groups accuse each other of tearing down posters, and aggressive confrontations as pro-Israeli and pro-Palestinian groups literally stand in opposition on Low Steps. Traditionally, tables supporting Israel face the mock-apartheid wall that Students for Justice in Palestine put up every year. But this year, the drama was exacerbated by two new developments. One is the formation of Columbia University Apartheid Divest (CUAD), which “calls for the University to divest its stocks, funds, and endowment from companies that profit from the State of Israel’s ongoing system of settler colonialism, military occupation, and apartheid law.” CUAD is embedded in the global Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement against Israel. The second is a Columbia chapter of the group Students Supporting Israel, which arrived on campus in January, just as CUAD was kicking off.

“When you have the ability, you start a BDS campaign because it’s never not an appropriate time,” says Shezza Abboushi Dallal, BC’16. SJP and JVP decided to launch a BDS campaign on campus at the start of the semester, as they felt they had the manpower to organize on a larger scale than in years past. Shezza, who is a prominent SJP member, says that SJP’s continued growth, combined with JVP’s recent formation, puts the movement in a strong position to pursue this goal.

Learn more about other activist groups on campus after the jump.

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