Dec

9

"what is a clio?"

“what is a clio?

Someone once said that the books in Butler were like candles during sex; they didn’t do much, but they set the ambiance. These books remain, largely, an untapped treasure trove of knowledge. Bwog Senior Staffer Nikki Shaner-Bradford interviews Columbia’s librarians about what they do and the resources they keep watch over. 

The organization of academic life at Columbia arguably revolves around the vast network of libraries at our disposal, especially as we enter into the final weeks of the semester. At this point in the year, the demand for library seats is at an all time high, with some students resorting to their bi-yearly visit to the Butler stacks, and others taking the opportunity to discover an entirely new place to skim over a semester’s worth of readings. But how much work goes unnoticed throughout the year in these houses of knowledge? What is the true significance of the library at a major research university? (And with all of the significance placed on research, why were only 0.11% of Giving Day Donations made to the libraries?)

Over the course of two weeks, I set out to ask various people who run our libraries to tell me a bit more about what they do, and how they believe the access to a renowned reference collection alters the academic experience at this university.

So what do librarians do?

Dec

9

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almaGraduate Workers of Columbia University-UAW has announced that votes are counted and graduate students at Columbia have voted to unionize. This comes after the National Labor Relations Board ruled this summer that graduate students at universities throughout the United States should be able to unionize, overturning a 2004 precedent-setting case involving Brown University.

This year’s case involved specifically Columbia University graduate students, after they pushed for unionization for two years. After the ruling this summer, Columbia University Media Relations Director Caroline Adelman made a statement disagreeing with the NLRB’s decision, stating “While we are reviewing the ruling, Columbia — along with many of our peer institutions — disagrees with this outcome because we believe the academic relationship students have with faculty members and departments as part of their studies is not the same as between employer and employee.” Keep in mind this is the statement regarding this summers allowing of a vote, rather than the newly announced vote outcome to utilize the ruling and unionize at Columbia. However, Columbia has advertised (through promoted social media posts) a website advocating to vote against unionization.

Update 12/9/16 6:00pm: Columbia has released their official statement on the vote in an email from the provost.

You can read it after the jump.

Dec

9

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the guests of honor

the guests of honor

Thursday night, Columbia Organization of Rising Entrepreneurs hosted Arianna Huffington and DJ Khaled in a discussion of his new book, The KeysThe book provides readers with DJ Khaled’s modern philosophy on success. Deputy Editor Mia Lindheimer covers the event.

Let me be clear: I didn’t follow DJ Khaled on Snapchat until I was standing in line for this event, freezing my ass off in the wind tunnel that was the area between Havemeyer and Math. I managed to suffer the few seconds it took to pull my hands out of my pockets and follow him, so that I could get some early eyes into the event. Those few seconds weren’t for nothing– I was immediately presented with a once-over of Arianna Huffington’s dress and signature inspirational messages from DJ Khaled himself. The excitement of knowing they were inside helped with the wait, but having to spend half an hour out in the cold when doors were originally supposed to be at 9:00pm? I didn’t need that.

Once we finally got inside, CORE members were running around everywhere trying to get everyone seated as quickly as possible. We wondered what the hold up was on the entry in the first place. We also noticed that they kindly gave each speaker two water bottles– one mini and one regular sized, which was strange. As we waited in our seats, a bunch of anonymous members of Khaled’s crew came through the door, and everyone in the audience raised their phones to get the perfect snap of Khaled’s entrance. They were continuously disappointed until in walked not Khaled, but his partner, Nicole, and their baby Asahd. The crowd went crazy– Khaled’s son is a recurring character on his endlessly popular Snapchat stories, though definitely a new character (he was born October 23rd).

Once the guests of honor, DJ Khaled and Arianna Huffington, walked in, CORE President Sara Sakowitz introduced the event. She waxed on about entrepreneurship and the inspiration we can take from both Khaled and Huffington, after which she handed the mic over to Sahir Jaggi and and Gary Lin to introduce the speakers. They went over what you’d expect– Huffington’s accomplishments, from launching The Huffington Post to publishing too many books to count, as while as Khaled’s accomplishments, from his successes in music production to his Snapchat fame. Finally, they gave the floor over to Huffington to lead the discussion with Khaled.

So what are the keys

Dec

9

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OUCH... just got #ZAPPED by this #LIGHTNING

OUCH… just got #ZAPPED by this #LIGHTNING

One should always exercise some wariness when approaching the Twitter of an institution, particularly a sports-related one—after all, who knows what lurks underneath those repeated mannequin challenges, hyper-edited photos, and “The Brotherhood” utterances of the various CU Athletics Twitter accounts? Bwog Senior Staff Writer Ross Chapman gives us a glimpse into the cringeworthy cyberlife of CU Athletics. 

Mundane Pictures on Weird Backgrounds

Last I checked, Columbia has nothing to do with lightning. Don’t tell that to the graphics designer for the basketball team, because he is all over that lightning background. Look at it very roughly align with the contour of Davis’s body! This is not the only photo with a nonsensical electric backing. But don’t think that Athletics has some special affinity for thunder. For instance, look at this football player kneeling in a stadium (not ours) in front of a pair of celestial Lions. For those of you looking for an older gentleman, consider this basketball coach in a vague action pose in front of New York City!

Demotivational Images

I’m sorry, does that compare athletes to eggs? See more past the jump

Dec

9

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youth... THIS is the face of the man who wants to take your e-cigaretté away

youth… THIS is the face of the man who wants to take your e-cigaretté away

Of the president: Today, after a national scandal that incited nationwide protests, President Park Geun-hye was voted for impeachment by South Korea’s Parliament. (New York Times)

Of the vape: Or the so-called “e-cigarette,” which is one of the most commonly used tobacco products by the Youth of today, has been found to pose developmental risks to adolescents as well as a risk equivalent to secondhand smoke. (The Columbus Dispatch)

Of the corporate model on buying/selling shoes: Benjamin Kapelushnik, that dude you saw in DJ Khaled’s Snapchats, runs a shoe business that has profited from nearly $1 million. He’s still in high school. (Great Big Story)

Of Santa: Santa has received some flak lately for fat shaming a 9-year-old boy in Forest City, N.C. Santa: cancelled. (The Washington Post)

vivek murthy stunting via Jason Reed/Reuters

Dec

8

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Krusty Krab is unfair...

Krusty Krab is unfair…

A majority vote has granted Barnard Contingent Faculty Union power to declare a strike. This news comes after a long contract negotiation process between the college and BCF-UAW, as the parties have struggled to settle details like fair wage and benefits. While Barnard would like for operations to continue as usual, a strike could mean cancelled exams for students enrolled in an adjunct professor’s class, for example. Provost Bell issued a statement to students today explaining the impact this decision has on them, assuring that classes outside the unit will still be held, and any changes would be communicated in advance. Her statement also clarifies that though a strike has been approved, its occurrence is not guaranteed.

Read the full statement after the jump

Dec

8

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Last year, around this time, we posted about slices of bread that some bold young Barnard student had attached (with thumbtacks) to the bulletin boards in the Quad. Today, we received a tip that the bulletin board bread has returned – and this time, it’s in Plimpton.

At first glance, it seems like a normal bulletin board...

Some…

 

BREAD! As fresh as though it came from the toast station at Hewitt.

BODY once told me

There it is, plain as day: bread as fresh as though it came from the toast station at Hewitt during lunch. Sources in Overheard @ Barnard report that bread was found on a bulletin board in Reid as well.

We here at Bwog are wondering: are these year’s bread boards the work of the same mastermind as last year’s? Or is this the work of an elite team of bread bandits, selected under the cover of night beneath a dying magnolia? Or has this phenomenon spread, as stress over finals grows, the lack of underground tunnels is felt more keenly, and students increasingly wish they could stab DSpar through the heart?

As before, the bread boards have left us with more questions than answers. If you are a Barnard Bread Bandit, you know a Barnard Bread Bandit, or you really want to date a Barnard Bread Bandit, hit us up at [email protected] or on our anonymous tip form.

Photos via Bwog Staff

Dec

8

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... to send in your crazy stories!

… to send in your crazy stories!

The days are getting shorter, the weather is getting colder, and classes are winding down. As you head off to the last meeting of that class you love (or despise), be prepared for your professors to engage in the time honored tradition of making an emotional (or eye-rollingly cheesy, depending on how you’re feeling) goodbye speech to your class, or to decide that they have better things to do altogether and simply not show up.

We want to hear what heartfelt, snarky, or simply absurd things your professors are saying and doing! Send an email to [email protected] with the name of the professor, the name of the course, and the best/weirdest remarks they’ve made. If your professors know enough about Columbia to know what Bwog is, they’ll just be grateful that they’ve made it onto Bwog, regardless of how odd their quote may be. What better way for you to procrastinate studying for finals?

We Want YOU via West Virginia Environmental Council

Dec

8

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Could you rate the correlation between two of your identities with Venn diagrams like this?

Could you rate the correlation between two of your identities with Venn diagrams like this?

Yesterday afternoon, Dr. Bonita London, CU Graduate School of Arts and Sciences ’06 and Associate Professor at Stony Brook University, gave a presentation on barriers and bridges to STEM engagement among women, focusing in particular on undergraduate students. Betsy Ladyzhets, senior staffer (and woman in STEM), describes Dr. London’s talk.

When I arrived in 614 Schermerhorn yesterday, the room was already half-full. Unlike most events I’ve written about for Bwog, this presentation appeared to have an audience primarily consisting of undergraduates – I even recognized a few faces. All of us were the women in STEM typified in the event description, and all of us were hoping that Dr. London could present new insights that would help us look at our majors and possible careers in new ways.

Dr. London began her presentation by stating the general purpose of her psychology research lab at Stony Brook. “The basic, general theme of the work I do in my lab is understanding how social identity affects everything,” she described. “Everything” includes health, mental wellbeing, and academic relationships, and numerous other facets of a person’s life. This type of research is called social health psychology.

She then explained why her research on women going into STEM fields is so important. STEM fields are growing at an incredible rate (80% of the fastest growing careers are in STEM fields), yet these fields have a very high attrition rate. For example, on average, 59% of students interested in computer science will change direction before completing their major or program. And these attrition rates are disproportionately high for women. Dr. London cited that in middle and high school, girls are actually taking part in advanced math and science classes with an increasing interest compared to boys, but this interest drops off some time between entering college and entering the workforce. Her research aimed to look into why this attrition occurs.

Dr. London went on to talk about disparity in STEM fields from a social identity framework. She explained that “STEM departments in particular tend to value natural ability over effort,” thus setting “a standard that many students can’t meet, but is a hallmark of what STEM faculty think is needed to be successful.” This standard is particularly dangerous when combined with the common stereotype that women are not good at the logic problems and rational thinking characteristic of STEM fields.

“This creates an environment that you have to be a genius, and you don’t have what it takes,” Dr. London said.

She described how she and her team more closely examined the challenges women in STEM face using the lens of social identity theory. She defined the terms “STEM identity” (extent to which an individual feels connected to or invested in their STEM field) and “Perceived Identity Compatibility”, or PCI (belief in conflict or compatibility between gender identity and STEM identity). If STEM and gender identities are in conflict, women are most likely to disengage from one of them – and they will usually choose to let go of their STEM identity rather than their gender identity.

In addition, social support can heavily influence how women going into STEM fields deal with the challenges they face. Dr. London explained that networks of support (especially of women) can buffer stressful experiences, such as going to college. The transition to college is particularly stressful, because students’ concerns about abilities, “fitting in”, and potential for success often become exacerbated during this time.

Dr. London and her team did a multifaceted experiment on undergraduate students interested in STEM fields at Stony Brook to examine “how women live the experience of their identity in the college context.” They collected data on 247 first-years who identified as women interested in STEM fields, first by having the students complete structured daily diaries during their first twenty-one days of college, then by having them complete weekly diaries during their second semester. These diaries asked students to rate how they felt they had performed in their STEM classes, how supportive they felt their friends and family were of their majors, how they felt they belonged in their STEM majors, and how likely it was that they might change majors.

Before the diaries started, the researchers did initial surveys that allowed them to attach a PCI ranking to each student. They found that for women with higher PCI rankings remained motivated in their STEM classes even when not doing well, while women with lower PCI rankings became less motivated when they failed. The researchers also found that perceived support buffers women when they’re struggling. They were also able to use PCI rankings calculated from survey data at the beginning of the spring semester to predict students’ end-of-year STEM engagement; students with lower PCI were more worried about others’ perceptions, and had lower GPAs in STEM courses.

Dr. London’s conclusion of her team’s study was that “PCI and social support are important for STEM engagement, particularly when female STEM students are struggling academically during the early transition to college.” However, they also found that, even though a high PCI rating and strong social support act as buffers when women in STEM are feeling less confident about belonging in their majors, on average, many of the women they studied ultimately will contribute to the high attrition rates of women in STEM fields. On average, the researchers saw drops in PCI, perceived support for students’ majors, and sense of belonging in STEM – and increases in expectations of dropping out of those STEM majors.

All of this research seems disheartening. How can we, women hoping to go into STEM fields, combat the entrenched societal pressures that seem to be dead-set against our success? How can we hold onto our confidence and support systems when kids in middle school classrooms told to draw a scientist all draw balding white men?

Dr. London provided a few recommendations at the end of her presentation. The most important ways of helping women succeed in STEM, she said, are exposure to role models, mentors, and reducing gender bias; as a result of her research, Stony Brook is working on applying these ideas directly to courses. Perhaps, someday, Columbia will make similar efforts (and when it’s finally completed, Barnard’s new TLC is supposedly going to promote STEM majors). But for now, all we can do is stick together, mentor each other, and remind ourselves that we belong in our STEM classes, laboratories, and discussions just as much as men do.

Fun with Venn diagrams via Dr. London (photo via Betsy Ladyzhets)

Dec

8

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The sun came out tomorrow for protestors at Standing Rock.

The sun came out tomorrow for protesters at Standing Rock.

After months of major, peaceful protests by indigenous peoples against the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) through the Standing Rock Sioux reservation water supply, the pipeline will been diverted. What does this mean, and what are conditions like in and around Standing Rock? Senior staffer Sarah Dahl recently caught up with Barnard sophomore Jessie Lee Rubin who, along with fellow students Yasmeen Abdel Majeed, Maggie Anderson, and Rachel Culp, just got back from the camp. For more information, here is a statement from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

How did you get there? We flew very early on Thanksgiving Day out of Newark to Bismarck (with really cheap student tickets) and then got a ride to the camp. We were there for about six days.

What made you decide to go? We really only wanted to go if we felt like we could give more by going than we were taking. Because of this, we raised about $800 (through Facebook statuses) before we went. [All this money went to the camp; the students paid for their plane tickets and borrowed their own supplies]. We were able to order a good number of supplies (including a windmill) from the organizers’ wish list, in addition to the volunteering we did once we got there.

What were living conditions like at the camp? We stayed in a tent, surrounded by thousands of other supporters. (I heard that at its peak, there were about 10,000 people there!) The first night we spent at Sacred Stone camp, and the rest of the time we spent at Oceti Sakowin. We had to bring multiple sleeping bags each because it was so cold, we would wake up in the morning with our sleeping bags covered in frost! No joke–I wore five pairs of socks to bed every night. We mostly brought our own food, even though the camps have communal mess halls, because we didn’t want to use up resources if we didn’t have to. While we were there, we attended a great talk on decolonization; the speaker argued that white allies’ entitlement to resources such as food and firewood at Standing Rock was a form of colonial violence. I tried to organize my stay around avoiding, if not combating, this dynamic as much as I could–using as few of their resources as I possible, and centering my trip on helping in whatever way was requested of me.

Who did they meet? How can you help?

Dec

8

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Trying to find a seat in Butler is a lot like being a lab mouse stuck in a cave.

Trying to find a seat in Butler is a lot like being a lab mouse stuck in a maze.

Members of the New York City Council’s Black, Latino, and Asian Caucus sent a letter to the chairman of the City University of New York, arguing against Governor Andrew Cuomo’s statements that CUNY administration has not been financially responsible. (New York Times)

After Donald Trump tweeted negative things about the union which represents Carrier, in Indiana, the union’s president Chuck Jones has been receiving threatening phone calls from anonymous sources. (Washington Post)

Due to an increase in deaths from heart disease, diabetes, accidents, and other health conditions, the life expectancy for Americans went down in 2015. This decrease is the first of its kind in more than two decades. (Washington Post)

In more hopeful news, researchers have found that regulating gamma brain waves in mice with Alzheimer’s managed to stave off some of the effects of the disease. This research could have transformative effects on the way in which Alzheimer’s research is conducted. (The Atlantic)

Staring into the Finals Maze via MilkGenomics

Dec

7

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This afternoon, Robert Goldberg, Barnard’s Chief Operating Officer, wrote an email to the Barnard community announcing that the Presidential Task Force to Examine Divestment submitted its full report on fossil fuel divestment to the Board of Trustees. This task force was created last semester as a result of Divest Barnard’s campaign encouraging Barnard to divest from all fossil fuel companies; it includes trustees, faculty, staff, and students.

The task force recommends that Barnard “divest from all fossil fuel companies that deny climate science or otherwise seek to thwart efforts to mitigate the impact of climate change.” Goldberg’s email goes on to state that this recommendation “would align the College’s investments with its core mission”, and that “the Task Force recommends that the College undertake a robust climate action program to reduce its carbon footprint.” It is unclear exactly to which companies this statement refers, and how much divestment will actually occur as a result of the task force’s recommendation.

The email concludes by announcing that the Committee on Investments will discuss this report and recommendation at its next meeting in March. Community forums on the issue of divestment will be held in the meantime.

You can read the task force’s full report here.

See Goldberg’s full email after the jump

Dec

7

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have you seen one of these around?

have you seen one of these around?

It’s 3 o’ clock in the afternoon and you’re stuck on God knows what floor of Schermerhorn, about to piss your pants. Where do you go? Where do you turn? You have no fucking clue because trying to figure out on which floor the damn bathrooms are is near impossible. Well, worry no more, because Bwog is here to the rescue. We sent junior staff writer Sarah Kinney to walk the halls of (nearly) every building on campus to locate every last elusive toilet. Here are her findings.

BWOG PRESENTS: THE DEFINITIVE GUIDE TO WHERE TF ALL THE BATHROOMS ARE IN (NEARLY) EVERY BUILDING YOU HAVE CLASS IN ON CAMPUS

Schermerhorn
Ground Floor: 4
Men: 3, 6, 9
Women: 3, 8

Havemeyer
Ground Floor: 3
Men: 3, 6, 7
Women: 2, 4, 7

Pupin
Ground Floor: 5
Men: 2, 5, 7, 9, 10, 12
Women: 3, 5, 6, 8, 13
Gender Neutral: 5

Hamilton
Ground Floor: 2
Men: 1, 3, 7
Women: 1, 3, 5

Mathematics
Ground Floor: 3
Men: 2, 5
Women: 2, 6, 4

Lerner
Ground Floor: 2 (campus entrance)
Men: every floor
Women: every floor
Gender Neutral: 5

toilet via homedepot.com

Dec

7

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Thinking about status

Thinking about status

Earlier today, Columbia College announced the names of 23 seniors it has inducted into the Phi Beta Kappa national honor society. A remaining 8% of students in the Class of 2017 will be announced in the spring. (Don’t give up hope!). Here are the new members:

Michael Abolafia
Paul Bloom
Christie Corn
Filipe de Avila Belbute Peres
Megan Felder
Jeffrey Gortmaker
Lauren Greenberg
Yubo Han
Zachary Heinemann
Emma Iaconetti
Weston Jackson
Mengzhou Jiang
Andrew Ling
Maria Mavrommatis
Kalina Misiolek
Dayalan Rajaratnam
Sarah Ricklan
Niklas Schwalb
Kate Seidel
Jacob Seidman
Carol Shou
Avinoam Stillman
Sophie Wilkowske

You can read the College’s statement after the jump:

Dec

7

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Alma Mater wants YOU to vote

Alma Mater wants YOU to vote

Columbia’s long-awaited unionization election is happening today and tomorrow (December 7-8)! In this election scheduled by the National Labor Relations Board, eligible voters will decide whether Columbia student research and teaching assistants will henceforth be represented by Local 2110 of the United Auto Workers.

If you’re an undergraduate or graduate TA, Research Assistant, Course Assistant, or any other student employee who provides instructional services to Columbia University, you are eligible to vote (click here for the full list of eligible voters).

Voters are expected to cast their ballots at the polling place on the campus where they are appointed or have been appointed in the past. If you’re voting on the Morningside Campus, you should vote in Earl Hall on the 2nd floor auditorium between 10am-8pm both today and tomorrow. If you’re voting from CUMC, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, or Nevis Laboratory, click here for your voting location and time.

Your voice matters in this issue, and will have a lasting legacy on Columbia’s campus! Happy voting!

image via columbia.edu

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