Dec

3

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Yum?

Yum?

You know what time of year it is. No, not cuffing season. Or Christmas. It’s crunch time, which means (for some of the riskier folk)  d r u g s. It can be hard to know whether to buy at all. And you may not know what to buy, especially if your doctor forgot to prescribe it to you. Don’t worry. Bwog’s got you covered. In this week’s Back-of-the-Envelope, we’ll tell you the ins-and-outs of campus dealing, and whether that guy from Spanish class who’s offering you Adderall is actually worth it.

  • Assume 75% of students on campus have ADHD, ADD, depression, anxiety, or another medical issue. These figures are based off actual data about the sharp increase in mental health diagnoses, as well as accepted fact that Columbia is a rich-ass school full of people who’ve been hip to the therapy trend since its beginning (and are also prone to root canals and wisdom teeth surgery that endow them with magical painkillers).
  • Assume 60% of those students are prescribed drugs, and 55% of them actually get the prescriptions filled (what about the other 5%? you’re wondering why anyone would be crazy enough to NOT fill their xanax scrip? well, my friend, try waiting in the basement pharmacy line at Duane Reade).
  • Assume 40% of these students have excess drugs that they are willing and ready to sell.

That 40% market saturation rate can be broken down into drug types. Let’s look at some common ones: Xanax and Klonopin are anti-anxiety pills, and can either make you feel high or sleepy. Adderall and Ritalin are stimulants, you want these for your all-nighters. Percocet, Vicodin, and Tylenol with codeine are painkillers.

  • Assume 40% of the prescriptions are for Adderall, Ritalin, or similar. Assume 30% are for antidepressants like Prozac or Abilify that can’t give you the instant gratification you need during exams. Of the remaining 30%, assume 20% is Xanax and Klonopin, and 10% are painkillers.

The Weeknd has a great song about Percocet, and it’s also commonly prescribed for wisdom teeth surgery. But it also might make you fall asleep. Is this really what you want (or need)? We’ll also assume the hazy qualities of Xanax and Kpins aren’t what you’re looking for during study time. So, let’s zero in on Addy. The above fractions leave us with a relatively low rate of availability for second-hand stimulants.

  • Assume average Adderall street price: $10/20 mg
  • Assume average (generic) Adderall prescription price with insurance: $40/month

Okay, so you’re going to pay a lot more on the street. Maybe you can get the homie price. Either way, do you think you’ll abuse the drug? Do you want to? Let’s assume no to both. In that case, if your level of exam desperation if 10^1 or higher on a scale of 10^2, and if Spanish class boy is offering you one pill for $10 or less, go for it. Just don’t end up like this Adderall-addicted lady in the New York Times.

Cheers!

Dec

3

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Godspeed, Jae.

Godspeed, Jae.

On Thursday, December 1st, the ill-frequented, rarely-updated developer blog for [email protected] announced its “30 day notice before b@ will go offline”. After almost 10 continuous years of servicing the greater Columbia community—with a few notable breaks earlier on—the pseudonymous online hangout now finds itself at death’s door. The site’s creator, Jonathan Pappas CC ’06, known affectionately on the website by his pseudonym “Jae Daemon” or just “Jae”, offered his reasoning on the developer blog, highlighting the site’s monetary and time commitment, his own distancing from the board, as well as potential safety liabilities present in bored@’s upkeep.

Bored@ is notoriously hard to explain, label, or pin values upon. The vast majority of users prefer to remain anonymous, hesitating to create and maintain pseudonymous accounts—”personalities”—with which to link their thoughts and opinions. Despite this, a healthy and unique internet culture flourished on the site. For every inside joke losing relevance, each meme fading into the Internet, and every power user who inevitably graduated and moved on with their life, bored@ remained very much alive. So much so that in a Blue and White investigation, the magazine wrote of bored@’s collective voice as “a more intelligent sort of 4chan-speak that is strongly influenced by social anxiety, privilege, gender, and pretension”. And this, in a way, is true. The front page of the website (as of the time of writing this article) includes depressing comments on the Columbia sex life, Columbia copypasta, lyrics, poetry, altered Biblical verse, personalities referencing each other, and, of course, quite a few shitposts. The site’s users take very literally the words emblazoned above bored@’s post box—”What’s on your mind?”

But for all the creativity and entertainment which colours the site’s culture, the anonymous nature of bored@ often attracted a nasty and brutish manner of thought. As in any anonymous forum, there were endless opportunities to herald socially-unacceptable, distasteful, and downright hostile comments. For [email protected], these included every comment under the sun about Columbia, Barnard, General Studies, race, religion, specific campus figures, specific administrative figures, both campus and international media, and politics. In some ways, [email protected] represented the only true space of free thought at Columbia, where those who were most socially, politically, and culturally alienated could carve out a small area of the Columbia community for themselves. To paint the site with such romanticisms, however, betrays a long history of scandal and hostility.

After returning in October of 2009 from a financially-induced break, bored@ shut down in December due to a proliferation of “slanderous and racist comments.” The site, which had grown to encompass a variety of schools within the Ivy League, was suffering from an assailment of “racial slurs [and] the most offensive things you could possibly come up with” posted via proxy servers. Despite returning to—and remaining at—Columbia since 2010, the site suffered from a number of scandals involving other participating universities. Most infamously, the Dartmouth division of the site, named [email protected] for Dartmouth’s Baker Library, grew more rapidly than any of the other schools’ boards, developing a very unique and aggressive online culture. [email protected] found itself involved in a series of distasteful scandals, as when users of the board launched threats and insults at Dartmouth activists protesting “homophobia, sexual assault and racism during the 2013 Dimensions of Dartmouth program,” or when a 2014 user posted a “guide on how to rape a specific member of the Class of 2017.” Nevertheless, the Dartmouth contingent of the board tenuously returned earlier this school year.

More recently, a seemingly explosive growth in the “alt-right” online culture has heralded [email protected]’s decline. In some ways, [email protected] grew unpalatable to a large window of the Columbia student body, often oppositely polarized to the standard rhetoric and discourse on campus. To many users, the board was the only place in a campus like Columbia, in a city like New York, to indulge in socially and academically dangerous viewpoints, while further hoping to discover they were not, in fact, alone with such ostracized ideas. To others, though, “alt-right” trolling served a means for entertainment and humour, and users would often bemoan the conflation of the board’s identity with intellectually vapid figures like Milo Yiannopoulos simply because “outsider” “normies” consistently forgot to not “feed the trolls.”

Regardless, the board is a very different place now than it was a year ago, and as it was a year before that. To decry Pappas’ decision as an act of defence against virulent ideas and speech would fly in the face of bored@’s 10 years of even allowing such ideas to be stated, argued, and amended—especially given the massive financial drain on Pappas personally. However, we don’t consider it melodramatic or romantic to remember the site as the truly last frontier of uninfluenced and entirely free intellectual space at Columbia, where personalities found friends and social groups, anonymous users presented socially unpalatable opinions, and campus journalists picked up breaking news. What will happen in the wake of [email protected]’s death, we cannot say. But if only for the decade of Columbia students who found some sentiments of community and belonging, we wish bored@ and Jae a fond farewell.

Chat via boredatbutler.com

Dec

3

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Even though there's no snow outside, let the arts bring you holiday spirit!

Even though there’s no snow outside, let the arts bring you holiday spirit!

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

Sunday, December 4th

Tuesday, December 6th

  • Curtis on Tour Chamber Ensemble, 6:00 PM, Miller Theatre– “The orchestral nature of Brahms’s G minor piano quartet, No. 25, along with its irresistible Gypsy-style final movement, makes it one of the finest of the genre. Emerging stars from the Curtis Institute of Music perform alongside their mentor, Ayane Kozasa, as they take on this multifaceted piece in our final Pop-Up Concert of 2016.” – Free tickets here.

What about the rest of the week?…

Dec

3

Written by

Smiling through the pain

House Speaker Paul Ryan has sat down with President-elect Donald Trump to discuss the U.S. Constitution and his plans during his presidency. Ryan and Trump have acknowledged their differences, but the two are openly speaking about some of Trump’s ideas that appear unconstitutional such as losing citizenship for burning the American flag,  and banning Muslims from entering the United States. Ryan stated, “We’re not looking back. We’re looking forward.” (Huffington Post)

By Sunday, an estimated 2,000 U.S. veterans are expected to show their support for Standing Rock oil pipeline protest in North Dakota. Some veterans have promised to act as “human shields” to protect protesters from law enforcement. (NBC News)

The Mall of America, the nation’s largest mall, has introduced their first black Santa. The co-owner of the Santa Experience at the mall was searching for a diverse Santa when they found Larry Jefferson, the only black Santa out of the 1,000 applying for the position. (ABC News)

Bee and butterfly populations continue to die off which could have a massive effect on the human populations. Scientists estimate that pollinators created a crop output worth $314-722 billion and $1.4 billion jobs depend on bees and butterflies. Scientist claim that a decrease in pollinators could potentially be a “dire threat to human welfare.” (News.com.au)

Another Trumpdate via The Huffington Post

Dec

2

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The show was great, but the name….

Tonight marks the second and final show for dance group Orchesis’s semester performance, 1, 2, 3, Fourchesis. Bwog sent staff writer Connie Blumenthal to dress rehearsal to check out the dancers’ smooth moves in Roone Arledge Auditorium. The final performance will start at 10 PM, with tickets for $6 with CUID at TIC/online, with cash accepted at the door after 9:30.

Despite my best intentions to audition, I’ve always missed the semesterly auditions for Orchesis, so I’ve never had the chance to perform with the group. As such, I was excited to have the chance to sit in on dress rehearsal to see exactly what I missed. Orchesis has the reputation of being one of the largest dance groups on campus, but I was still surprised when I walked into Roone Arledge Auditorium by just how many dancers there were. I felt like I was back in my ballet days with dancers running around half dressed, figuring out last minute details, fixing costume glitches, and working on homework. The energy and excitement from the dancers was almost tangible, and I was equally excited as I took a seat to watch the final rehearsal.

Orchesis is one of many dance groups on campus, but it stands out as one of the largest groups that performs strictly student choreographed pieces. Additionally, everything from costumes to lighting are student designed, making it a truly massive undertaking. What makes Orchesis different from other dance groups like New York Live Arts, Columbia University Ballet Ensemble (CUBE), Columbia Ballet Collaborative (CBC), and Raw Elementz is the variety of dance styles that are showcased in Orchesis. Styles of dance included everything from lyrical to modern, contemporary ballet to hip hop, and jazz to tap, and some performances featured a elements of all the above. The show comprised thirteen pieces in total, mixed with short interludes, and opened with a jazzy number choreographed by Coya Pruden and set to Michael Bublé’s “Feeling Good.”  For me, this opener was the best possible way to lead into the show; the performance was upbeat and fun, definitely a piece that would endear the performers to the audience.

How did the rest of the show go?…

Dec

2

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"corporate man searching for something" - getty images

i’m just a corporate man living in a corporate world

After catastrophic blows to the bank account from Thanksgiving and Black Friday, perhaps we are all thinking about either 1) doing another psychological study or 2) getting a job. To help prepare undergraduates like well-done and well-seasoned prime ribs for the corporate and otherwise world, CCE will have an Undergrad Career Prep Week from next Monday, Dec. 5, to Friday, Dec. 9. Each day will feature a workshop from 12:30 p.m. to 1:00 p.m; to reserve a spot, RSVP here. The workshops are as follows:

  • Monday: Lionshare
  • Tuesday: Resumes and Cover Letters
  • Wednesday: LinkedIn Profile Development
  • Thursday: Building A Professional Network
  • Friday: Interviewing Skills

On Friday, there will be two information sessions: one geared toward first-years interested in internships/externships and another for all undergraduate students interested in summer internships. Happy (or grim, or angry, or indifferent, or resigned) job hunting!

corporate soul-searching via Getty Images

Dec

2

Written by

the chats can be a time for healing and support

the chats can be opportunities for healing and support

To foster community with students in the current post-election atmosphere, beginning next week, several faculty members will visit the common areas of some dorms to chat with students about their thoughts and their plans for the future. The week will wrap up with an event on Thursday. The location and time of these events are as follows. and all are welcome:

  • Monday: 5:30-7:30 p.m., IRC,
  • Tuesday: 7-8 p.m., East Campus
  • Wednesday: 6:30-7:30 p.m., Schapiro
  • Thursday: 6-8 p.m., Sanctuary: Social, Legal, and Historical Perspectives on an Activist Category, Julius S. Held Lecture Hall

Image via Michal Rzepecki / Huffington Post Creative Labs

Dec

2

Written by

two raw eggs

two raw eggs

The oldest person in the world, Emma Morano of age 117, credits her longevity to sleep, healthy relationships, and a stringent diet that includes two raw eggs per day and some cookies. Her doctor, Carlos Bava, says she has perfect cholesterol and glucose levels. (CNN)

Starting next month in Texas, aborted fetuses will be required to be buried or cremated. It is unknown yet whether this will discourage facilities from performing abortions or if it will push facilities to increase costs. (The Huffington Post)

Vote recounts for the 2016 presidential election are currently underway in Wisconsin and pending in Michigan. This effort was begun and is financed by Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein, who claims that voting machines were hacked. (The New York Times)

Note to all Starbucks shareholders (because yes, I know you’re out there, and yes, I’m not sure there’s any relevance at all to this acknowledgment): CEO Howard Schultz of Starbucks, will, corporately, resign to corporately focus on other corporate initiatives tied to—surprise—coffee. They have to do with roasteries or something. (The Washington Post)

two raw eggs via Getty Images

Dec

1

Written by

Artopolis's sangria looks delicious.

Artopolis’s sangria looks delicious.

In this week’s Whine & Cheez, Bwog uncovers a hidden gem restaurant in the MoHi neighborhood. Artopolis, home of scrumptious desserts, also serves a killer White Wine Sangria.

Offered in both a pitcher for $18 or just a glass for $6, this sangria is fair priced. The pitcher, filled with beautiful seasonal fruit, is a joy to even stare at. The zesty, aromatic white infused with fruit and mixed with a tad of juice can turn any day upside down.

Artopolis offers an array of desserts that can be paired perfectly with the sweet, yet light concoction. Chocolate Mousse, Raspberry Tart, and even Crepes pair wonderfully with this refreshing sangria.

Whether its a rainy day and you are in need of a taste of summer or too cold to go outside, this refreshment will be worth the trek to Amsterdam between 113th and 114th.

Dec

1

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Come to the Tree Lighting Ceremony!

Come to the Tree Lighting Ceremony!

Though the weather outside may feel more like the beginning of Fall than Winter, December has officially begun, and with that comes Columbia’s annual Tree Lighting Ceremony!

The ceremony, which is jointly hosted by CCSC, SGA, GSSC, and ESC, will begin at 6 p.m. on College Walk, but there will be cider, hot chocolate, and Columbia swag as early as 5:30 p.m.

For CC students only, there will be a Winter Celebration in the Journalism School’s world room, hosted by the Columbia College Alumni association.

For more details, visit the official facebook event.

Official Tree Lighting Design via Helen Lu

Dec

1

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Etienne Balibar, the author of Citizen Subject.

Etienne Balibar, the author of Citizen Subject.

Last night, Etienne Balibar discussed his new book, Citizen Subject, to a packed room of comparative literature fanatics, political enthusiasts, and avid philosophy students. Bwogger Becky Novak attended the event.

Balibar’s book is considered to be a synthesis of his beliefs surrounding the necessarily antagonistic relationship between citizen and subject, an in analyzing this couplet, he advances towards the heart of the problem of citizenship.  The visiting professor of French and Romance Philology, is famous for his Post-Marxist theories on politics.  It was an evening of discussion, questioning, and celebration for the publishing of what is considered to be a synthesis of Balibar’s career-long thoughts on modernity in the frame of self-enunciation of the subject, the community as “we,” the cycle of citizen to subject to citizen once again; finally manifesting itself as a unique viewpoint at the center of both philosophical and political anthropology.

What happened at the event?

Dec

1

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screen-shot-2016-12-01-at-2-02-21-am

Donald Trump’s potential cabinet is acting about as mature as Regina George

Donald Trump has potentially appointed some members of the business elite to his cabinet, signaling that the interests of Wall Street will likely be important to his administration. (New York Times)

Nancy Pelosi was reelected as the Democratic leader of the House of Representatives for the 2016-18 congressional turn. (The Atlantic)

Police officers in North Carolina will not prosecute the police officer responsible for the death of Keith Lamont Scott, back in September of 2016. (The Atlantic)

In more humorous (albeit slightly terrifying) news, Newt Gingrich is initiating a feud with Mitt Romney, calling him a “suck-up” to President-Elect Donald Trump.

Mean Girls via IMDB

Dec

1

Written by

it might ease your symptoms, but it won't return your dignity

it might ease your symptoms, but it won’t return your dignity

Life at Columbia gets stressful. It is around one hundred times worse when you face a little problem that 50% of women will experience sometime during their life: a UTI.

It begins the night after a crazy party that ended with some marathon sex in someone else’s room. Said someone falls asleep on you almost immediately after completion, and you’re in no position to scurry to an unknown bathroom, particularly given that you have no fucking idea where your underwear (or dignity?) is. You know you should ~cleanse~ your urinary tract, but you just close your eyes, head slightly dizzy, and drift off, hoping for the best.

Or, you’ve been with someone that you KNOW you’ll get a UTI from. You just know, not that he’s dirty or anything, but it’s happened before. But thirst knows no bounds, and you take your cranberry pills right after you receive that 2am text thinking ‘I’m prepared.’ You’re not prepared. You wake up okay, but as you sit in your Contemporary Civilization class, or at Sunday drunch, you know what’s coming with the first stabbing pain in your urinary tract.

The last situation is almost as likely: it just fucking happens. You’re as celibate as the Christian girl in the Secret Life of the American Teenager. You’re applying to grad schools and jobs and you don’t have time for physical contact. You haven’t seen anyone but your suitemates in over 2 weeks because applications are taking precedent over classes. You haven’t showered – let alone let someone of the opposite sex come close enough to smell you. You still get a UTI.

It gets worse…

Nov

30

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snl_logo__121127192010

as New York as bagels and pigeons

If you’re interested in SNL, or in a potential acting or directing career, this is the article for you! On Tuesday, LateNight Theater, an on-campus late-night comedy sketch group, hosted their first annual speaker series, featuring Don Roy King, the current director of Saturday Night Live. Bwog sent staff writer Lexie Lehmann to check it out. 

Don Roy King is an icon of late-night television. Currently in his 11th year as Saturday Night Live’s Director, King previously worked on Survivor, The Early Show, and The Mike Douglas Show. As a result of his directing work, King has won several Daytime and Primetime Emmy Awards, as well as awards from the Director’s Guild of America.

On Tuesday, Don Roy King sat down for a question forum led by Nathaniel Jameson, CC’18, a member of Columbia’s LateNight Theater group. Overall, King was a lively, charming, and captivating personality — wonderfully spirited even in his old age. He dressed sharply in bright blue pants and a burgundy jacket, perfectly matching the cozy *aesthetic* of Barnard 304.

During the event, King answered questions on a number of topics, beginning with how he got his start in directing. As an undergraduate at Penn State, King was interested in performing, but majored in broadcasting to satisfy his parents. During a practical broadcasting assignment in his senior year, King stumbled upon his innate talent for directing when one of his peers failed to manage their assignment correctly, and King was forced to step in. He likened the experience as turning into the “quarterback on a football team,” forced to call quick shots and move things around on a dime. King was immediately drawn to this high stakes and the fast-paced environment, and knew that directing was the right path for him to follow.

Read King’s advice for aspiring actors and directors

Nov

30

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we're the real blue ivy (bye yale)

we’re the real blue ivy (bye yale)

Seniors, as of now, you’ve probably survived around 7 sets of finals, umpteen papers, multiple housing-lottery-induced anxiety attacks, and dozens of hangovers and sleepless nights. Now’s your chance to get the recognition you deserve from this vast institution and to become a real adult.

If you’re graduating in May, remember to submit your degree application by tomorrow, December 1!

Send in your application as an attachment to [email protected], or bring it in hard copy to the Student Service Center in 205 Kent Hall.

Congratulations, seniors, and we’ll see you all at commencement on May 17!

image via columbia.edu

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