Feb

7

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Let's be real, this is the best visual representation of SuperBowl Sunday.

Let’s be real, this is the best visual representation of SuperBowl Sunday.

Hey, hey, hey, all you football fans out there! We know you’ve been deprived of good football since coming to Columbia (no shade). In order to remedy that, Bwog has decided to accommodate your need for football fanaticism. We know that our usual meeting time (7pm in Lerner 505) conflicts with the 6:30pm SuperBowl tonight. So we’ve changed the time of today’s meeting to 3pm in Lerner 505. So come hang with us! Bring the pitches and we’ll bring the snacks. And then go watch the game – or alternatively, go watch the Puppy Bowl instead.

Soirée SuperBowl via Guillaume Capron/CC-BY-SA-2.0

Feb

7

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Bark if you love football!

Bark if you love football!

Even more exciting than the SuperBowl? The Puppy Bowl, of course! It starts at 3pm today, and it will be downright adorable. Also, if you’re still confused as to what this wonderful event entails, click here to find out. (Wired)

A sick baby sea lion, aka a pup, was found in a restaurant in San Diego, but SeaWorld officials are hopeful that they can nurse it back to health. (FOX NEWS)

Jeb Bush does not care if you like him or not. In New Hampshire this weekend, he told the crowd, “I don’t give a you-know-what about whether I’m popular or not. That is fleeting.” (Washington Post)

Chelsea Clinton, Hillary’s beloved daughter, had a little slip-up this week and called Bernie “President Sanders.” Awkward! (NY Daily News)

As the presidential primaries begin, everyone (or at least, every democrat) is waiting on one woman’s word: Elizabeth Warren. Who will she endorse? (Huffington Post)

Humphrey via Joshua T. Beck/CC-BY-SA-4.0

Feb

6

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The spitting image of Prezbo, as drawn by Mason Amelotte

The spitting image of Prezbo, as drawn by Mason Amelotte

The official bacchanal lineup has not been released, which has left us time to fantasize about who we want to see onstage. Here are our top 15 requests:

1. Sweet Life by Frank Ocean
The concert is on April 2nd, and since want to be on the beach at this point in the year, Frank would bring us perfect pacific vibes.

2. Hail Mary by Tupac
He may (or may not) have been shot in 1997, but that didn’t stop him from appearing at coachella in 2012.

3. Little Bit by Drake ft. Lykke Li
2009-so-far-gone-fresh-off-Degrassi Drake would make us feel youthful in the birth of spring.

4. Used To by Drake ft. Lil Wayne
Post-glow-up Drake would make us feel like we had a big ass Bacchanal budget.

5. Leave Me Alone by Kaytranada
Everyone would become a good dancer during his set, even if your dance moves are limited to a head bob seasoned with some bold shoulders.

6. Dare by Gorillaz
Imagine seeing a cartoon band live tho.

7. Flawless by Beyoncé ft. Nicki Minaj
Think about the shit that would go down if there were a billion dollars on Low Steps.

8. Forever by Majid Jordan
If we can’t afford drake maybe we can get his friends.

9. Pink Toes by Childish Gambino
All these gambinos but the lineup still childish.

10. Don’t by Bryson Tiller
In the spirit of going against instructions, bring a fanny pack to the show and sing this song to your new man/chick while staring your old one in the eyes.

11. Buffalo by Tyler the Creator
In the interest of creating the ultimate mosh pit on Low, Tyler should definitely be there yelling at everyone in yellow.

12. DMT by xxyyxx
While getting ready to recite all of the lyrics you memorized on rap genius after the lineup’s release, you’re going to want to chill to his beats.

13. Right Hand Man by the cast of Hamilton
The only thing more hype than having these guys here would be having the actual founding fathers perform.

14. Lost in the world by Kanye West
Will “Waves/Swish/So Help Me God” ever be as good as My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy? Will anything ever be as good as My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy?

15. Work by Rihanna
Mostly so that we can make this badgalPrezBo doodle relevant.

Feb

6

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240px-Smoking_area.svg

USenate has a special affection(?) for the Smoking Policy.

Joe Milholland, Governmental Bwogger Extraordinaire, attended the USenate plenary this week. An unexpectedly wide range of topics came up, making for some interesting takeaways. But, of course, how can one have a USenate plenary without mentioning the Smoking Policy?

The University Senate had a plenary on Friday, and several smaller topics came up. Here they are, followed by two policy updates:

  • After a moment of silence for the Columbia students killed and injured in the Global Brigades trip to Honduras, PrezBo said that the university’s response was “just outstanding.” PrezBo singled out Samuel Seward, Robert Gristo, and Kavita Sharma, who flew to Honduras as quickly as possible once they heard the news.
  • Columbia College Senator Ramis Wadood said the Student Affairs Committee will release the student quality of life report in a week to a week and a half. He also said that SAC has voted to support a plaque that indicates Columbia is built on land once lived on by the Lenape people.
  • The university’s faculty have been taking a quality of life survey of their own, and, according to Sharyn O’Halloran, 33% of faculty completed it. O’Halloran will provide highlights from the surrey’s data on April 1 and will have more detailed info on April 29. O’Halloran also said that a quality of life survey for research officers is being rolled out this semester.
  • A proposal to give non-tenured faculty “longer notice periods for any decisions not to renew their appointments” was presented and discussed. The proposal passed unanimously, although one senator worried this might lead the university to hire more part-time faculty.

Smoking Policy

  • The Smoking Policy – a perennial University Senate topic – reared its head once more from the deepest, darkest depths of Columbia policy discussion. Specifically, Research Officer Senator Daniel Savin asked for an update, saying, “Walking around campus, it really doesn’t seem as if there’s been any change in the amount of smoking or the location of smoking.”
  • “This is my favorite topic,” said O’Halloran in response. “I will simply say I too have noticed those issues. We have an implementation committee. They will be coming back to us next year with an assessment of whether this has worked or not.” She thanked Savin for his input.

The Institute for Ideas and Imagination

  • A resolution to establish an Institute for Ideas and Imagination passed unanimously. The institute, located at the Global Center in Reid Hall, Paris, would house 14 fellows from humanities-related fields – 7 from Columbia’s faculty and 7 from around the world (not necessarily university faculty).
  • “Broadly speaking, the idea is this: America has probably the best universities in the world,” said Senator Mark Mawozar. “Nevertheless, they’ve benefited in various ways from a period of world history – about 50 or 60 years – when America has been the unchallenged hegemon. And that can lead to a certain kind of intellectual inertia, in which you assume, within your field, or your discipline, or your subject, that you know exactly what’s knowledge and how it should be defined and what’s mainstream and what’s not. And the world’s changing now, pretty fast.”

Feb

6

Spring semester is bound to get you down as your work starts to pile up and the temperature continues to drop. We’re here to help you figure out just how you will beat this Spring Semester Slump and make it to Bacchanal alive and well.

 

Feb

6

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When you’re overcome by the spirit of jazz, things can get crazy

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience them first-hand. “This Week in the Arts” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

Tuesday, February 9

  • Better Git It in Your Soul: An Interpretive Biography of Charles Mingus – Book Talk and Jazz Performance by the Mingus Trio, 7:00 PM, Buell Hall – Author Krin Gabbard will discuss his biographical examination of Charles Mingus, touching upon the musician’s life, musical innovation, and influence. Book talk will be accompanied by a performance of Mingus’ work. “This talk and performance will be of interest to anyone who cares about jazz, African American history, and the artist’s life.” (Event is free, but RSVP to ym@columbia.edu for the event)

Wednesday, February 10

  • Mid-Day Music featuring Nansong Huang, 12:00 PM, Garden Room at the Faculty House – Columbia University and Juilliard School pianist Nansong Huang will be performing Brahms Piano Sonata No. 3 in F minor, Op. 5 and Debussy Images, Book 1 as part of the Mid-Day Music recital series.

Thursday, February 11

  • Black Light: Tom Lloyd, Lorraine O’Grady & the Effect of Art Historical Disappearance, 6:00 PM, Event Oval in the Diana Center – Art historian Krista Thompson examines the work of Tom Lloyd, “a Black artist among the first wave working with light and electronic technologies in the 1960s,” drawing from Lorraine O’Grady’s performance art as she “experiments with more expansive definitions of art and new methodologies of writing art history.”
  • Embodied Cognition: Music and Movement, 6:00 PM, The Heyman Center in the Common Room – A workshop that explores “the relationship between music and embodiment,” including the musician-instrument relationship and elements of teaching and learning music. A panel discussion and time for responses will follow the presentation.

Friday, February 12

  • Bold//Brilliant//Beats, doors open at 7:45 PM, Event Oval in the Diana Center – Barnard Student Life hosts a “groundbreaking concert of music celebrating musicians of non-dominant identities.” (Get free tickets with BC/CUID at boldbrilliantbeats.eventbrite.com)
  • “The Glass Piano”, 8:00 PM, Shapiro Hall – “The Glass Piano is a new play by Alix Sobler, directed by Matt Trucano. It was inspired by the true story of Princess Alexandra of Bavaria who believed she swallowed a full sized, grand piano made of glass.” (Reserve free tickets here)

Saturday, February 13

  • Albert Murray–An American Original: Novelist, Essayist, Thinker, 9:00 AM (full day event), Buell Hall – A symposium intended to elaborate on Murray’s contribution to American “thought and letter.” Jazz performances will occur following the symposium. (Event is free, but RSVP to ym@columbia.edu for the event)
  • Zabardast, doors open at 7:00 PM, Roone Arledge Auditorium – “Like music? Like Bollywood? Like food? And most of all, can you not pronounce “Zabardast”? Well if you answered yes to any of these questions come to CU SUR’s annual showcase! Bollywood fusion A Cappella groups from all over the tri-state area will be there, including The MIT Ohms, Yale Sur et Veritaal, Harvard Mirch, BU Suno and CU Raaga. Guest performance by Bhangra as well! It will be a great show and yes Indian food will be provided.”
  • “The Glass Piano”, 2:00 PM and 8:00 PM, Schapiro Theatre

Jazz Hands by SamsonX/Wikimedia Commons

Feb

6

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Does this kind of surgery require passing Mowsh bio?

Does this kind of surgery require passing Mowsh bio?

A video of an anonymous “surgeon” performing surgery on a Reese’s Peanut Butter cup has gone viral. Check it out. (Mashable)

A day care worker from Arizona was fired after posting pictures on Snapchat of her middle finger in front of a young child’s face with the caption “swear I love kids!” (The Epoch Times)

A New Zealand politician was hit in the face with a large, rubber, phallic plaything while giving an interview to the press. (Daily Mail)

Blue Origin, a private spaceflight company created by Amazon Founder Jeff Bezos, has beat Elon Musk’s SpaceX in creating the first reusable rocket. Neat! (The Verge)

Grey’s Anatomy But With Food via Youtube

Feb

5

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Laura and collaborators collecting musings on love from New York commuters for her project Conversation Hearts.

Laura and collaborators collecting musings on love from New York commuters for Conversation Hearts.

A pretty daunting (and equivocal) title, eh? Strange titles don’t intimidate us! Last night we sent new staffer Raji Ganapathy all the way to Knox Hall to check out this art talk co-sponsored by the Columbia Center for Oral History Research and the Oral History Master of Arts Program. Here are her thoughts.

As I power-walked the the four blocks to Knox Hall, armed with a Chai Tea Latte in one hand and a croissant in the other, I wasn’t quite sure what to expect from this event. Land art? Urban canvases? Brooklyn? What did it all mean? I continued to ponder as I found myself sitting at a round table in a sweet little room populated mostly by oral history graduate students and the friends and family of the two guest speakers.

As the lights dimmed, Laura Barnett, an artist and grad student in Columbia’s oral history program, introduced herself and began to present some of the art she has created over the past decade or so, so that we could understand “her background and what experiences she [was] coming in with.” Laura’s art seems to center on the theme of sharing stories and memories in a public, urban space. She stated that she emphasizes themes such as shared authority and the coexistence of multiple perspectives in her work, and as she described some of her favorite projects to the audience, I saw the essence of these themes captured quite meaningfully.

The first piece Laura shared was Memory Kit, an art exhibition featured at Union Theological Seminary in 2014 which gave viewers their own “memory kits” filled with acorns that they could use to mark significant or beautiful moments in their lives. Another piece she shared was Conversation Hearts, a collaborative poem that includes the voices of unrelated individuals from all of New York City’s boroughs. As someone with little experience examining or creating performance art, I found Laura’s work quite fascinating. She was able to take some very private aspects of human interaction, such as emotionality and sentimentality, and translate them into artwork that was accessible, collaborative, and highly interpretative. By involving her audience in the creation of her pieces in such a fundamental way, Laura was able to portray very basic but genuine human interactions as “art.”

Discover land art after the break

Feb

5

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wow i'm bad at ms paint

Two seniors with everything to prove face off

Columbia and Yale have been held down for far too long. These two teams haven’t been to the NCAA tournament since the 60’s, but are now both 4-0 and will face off tonight at 5 p.m. in New Haven. The winner of the match will have the inside track to securing the Ivy League title, an opportunity Columbia hasn’t come close to in over twenty years.

Columbia comes into this match only a slight underdog, but the preseason projections can’t capture the totally different historical trajectories of these two teams. Columbia, historically, has not done well in men’s Ivy basketball. Since 1993-94, the Lions have only had one winning season. Even following a successful 2013-14 campaign (8-6), the Lions were unable to maintain their momentum due to injuries and an inability to close out games.  Yale, on the other hand, hasn’t had a losing season since 2009-10. Just like in the academic polls, Yale has consistently found itself a #3 to Harvard and Princeton throughout the 2010’s. Last season, the Bulldogs came within seconds of finally securing their first NCAA bid since 1962, but crumbled in the final seconds of their final two games. The Lions, if they continue their run this season, will look to earn their first spot in the tournament since 1968.

Both teams have a remarkable senior class which hasn’t been wholly together until this year. For the Lions, Maodo Lo leads the team in points, 3-pointers, minutes, and steals, as he has become the star of the team since his buzzer-beating shot against Valparaiso in the CIT two years ago. He temporarily dethroned Alex Rosenberg as the Lion in the spotlight when Rosenberg went down with a foot injury and missed last season, but now that Alex has a buzzer-beater of his own on the highlight reel, they’re both once again big men on campus. Grant Mullins is our resident sharpshooter, and Isaac Cohen, battling through some injuries, is the rebounding and assist machine through which the offense loves to run. Yale, meanwhile, has their own star in Justin Sears, a forward who’s dominated most Ivy squads for the last two years. Their seniors also include Jack Montague, a 3-point shooter who has a history of burning the Lions, and Brandon Sherrod, the Whiffenpoofs singer who’s hit 25 straight field goals.
Viewing party and channel info after the break!

Feb

5

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Dave's brownies + birthday wishes at ButCafé.

Dave’s brownies + birthday wishes at ButCafé.

Remember when Bwog turned 10? Remember when we changed our logo, posted a lot of cool articles, and reminisced about the beginning of the internet? It was great, and to perpetuate the nostalgia, here’s a Bwog Asked from patrons of ButCafé on what they think of Bwog now. The staffer who gathered these responses noted: “These responses are still better than some of the things my brother has written in my birthday cards tbh.” Alas.

“It’s alright.”
“I think the senior wisdoms are really funny.”
“Spec has better articles.”
“Mostly gossip.”
“I hate Bwog.”
“I don’t know I don’t read it often .”
“I like how it’s always been a good place to get quick campus news? Yea Bwog is alright.”
“It used to be funnier.”
“Is Bwog the one with the crown?”

Image via Bwog

Feb

5

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The Hamilton knows what's up.

The Hamilton knows what’s up.

Two weeks ago, we finally acknowledged how fucking cold it was. Now we don’t know what’s happening with the weather. Is it snowing? Cloudy? Sunny? Windy? Raining? Since it’s only the beginning of February, anything could happen. But have no fear! The Bwog Staff has compiled a list of ways to stay warm for the rest of winter – ways you might not have considered before.

  • Put your coat on the vents at John Jay Dining Hall while eating
  • Or just spend your entire day in the back room of John Jay Dining Hall. It’s a sauna in there.
  • Spend a lot more time in the Hamilton elevator (excess body heat)
  • Walk over subway vents on Broadway
  • Stand on that vent behind Butler
  • Stand on that vent in front of Butler (like all the international smokers do)
  • Stand on that vent outside of the law school on 116
  • Stand on any vent?? Why are there so many vents on this campus?? We don’t question it. We love it.
  • Put ur gloves underneath your thighs while you’re sitting (then when you put them on your hands will be warm)
  • Win Ham4Ham
  • Stand outside Dig Inn for as long as you can before fainting from the overpowering scent of grilled chicken

More ways to keep toasty

Feb

5

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Our pal Bill

Our pal Bill

Did ya catch Obama’s State of the Union the other week? NYC’s very own mayor, Bill de Blasio gave a similar address last night, titled “State of the City.” Watch here! (NYC.gov)

Democratic presidential candidates Bernie and Hill debated each other last night on NBC! Both refused to answer the question as to what issues they would prioritize if they became prez. (NY Times)

Conspiracy theorists have introduced the idea that an ancient Greek sculpture depicts a laptop computer. Time travel is real! (Daily Mail)

North Korea sent balloons filled with cigarette butts to South Korea. Wheeeeee. (Esquire)

To end with some hope, “rich nations,” including ours, announced Thursday that they would pledge more than $10 billion to help refugees. (NY Times)

Bill de Blasio via By The office of Public Advocate for the City of New York/Wikimedia Commons

Feb

4

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Columbia Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) and Columbia/Barnard Jewish Voice for Peace (JVP) recently united to form a new student activist group on campus called Columbia University Apartheid Divest. The group hosted their first event tonight in order to educate the Columbia community about their campaign, Boycott, Divest, and Sanctions (BDS). The event as well as the group sparked conversation on campus in the past few days. You can find live coverage of the event, known as BDS 101, below.

Feb

4

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Killing it with those socks

Killing it with those socks

Every Wednesday, the Music Performance Program celebrates dedicated and committed students with an hour long concert every Wednesday in the faculty house. Jazz enthusiast Amara Banks stopped by yesterday to check it out.

My love for live jazz cannot be shaken by pre-hurricane winds or unforgiving cold (yes, 50 degrees still reminds me of the Grinch’s icy heart), so I happily walked an inconvenient distance to East Campus. Given the talent found within the Columbia community, I am not surprised with how worthwhile this walk ended up being.

This week, I had the treat of hearing Evan Tarrh and and Jack Aylor. The two performed piano and bass duets, with occasional solos from Evan. When I arrived, I noticed that Evan’s feet were clothed in socks that also had pianos on them– the ultimate sign that the show was going to be great. And of course, I wasn’t wrong. The sounds were reminiscent of Blue’s Clues instrumentals, or a Saturday in Nordstrom when they hire a live pianist. Although the audience was rather anemic, (ten people was likely the peak of their crowd) those who attended enjoyed their performance. Their music triggered different emotions that, when coupled with the rain outside, could make one feel as if he were in a Drake video. But not just any kind of Drake video: when Evan and Jack played piano-bass duets, audience members were in a Headlines-Tuesday kind of video, or maybe even his HYFR bat mitzvah. But as soon as Jack rested his fingers from plucking the strings, we were at an intersection of Marvin’s Room and an interlude for a girl with a big booty, like Cece or Bria. Nonetheless, the two artists are amazingly talented, as demonstrated by how influential their music was on my mood. I left the showcase feeling empowered, reflective, and like I wanted to text my ex.

Feb

4

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Surprisingly, not all vegans look like stock photos of salad-eating blondes!

Surprisingly, not all vegans look like stock photos of salad-eating models!

Shopping period is over, which means your schedule is finally complete and (if you’re lucky) not a complete mess. But that’s just your academic schedule. What about those extracurriculars? Don’t you wanna get involved with something? Meet new people? Since the Activities Fair is only held in September, joining new clubs during the Spring Semester can be difficult. Fortunately, Bwog sent Staff Writers Jessa Nootbaar and Jennifer Nugent to cover CU Vegan Society’s meeting this Tuesday, bringing you the first ClubHop of the semester.

We entered the meeting hesitantly. Having received emails from the society encouraging us to participate in their activism, we feared we might be out of place. While both having been vegan for over four years, we had been applauded by our meat-eating peers as “chill vegans.” In other words, we don’t have much interest in telling you what you should and shouldn’t eat. We’ll just sit here eating our side salad and quietly taking our B12 supplement (although next time, please submit your restaurant selection to us for vegan-friendly approval).

As we slid open the door to Lerner 505L, we didn’t find the white dreads and patchouli oil we had anticipated. Instead, the sixteen students squeezed around the table represented a diverse gamut of people: all four colleges, all genders, all places of origin, and all types of eaters (vegan, non-vegan, and “transitioning”). They even looked normal.

We went around the table, introducing ourselves by name and favorite food, the answers ranging from “roasted cauliflower” to “pizza” (vegan, of course). Every comment was met with a series of affirmations and excitement, and the two of us began to entertain the idea that we had found a community of like-minded individuals.

The meeting soon turned to more structured, serious discussion. The topic had been chosen by popular vote a few days prior, they said. We whipped out the Notes apps on our phones, journalists that we are, thinking that this would be the moment when they finally revealed themselves to be the militant vegans we had feared. Imagine our disappointment when the leaders announced the topic: vegdating.

Find out what the heck

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