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Feb

21

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JJ’s 22 hours a day would be a blessing and a curse.

This week, ESC mainly touched upon ensuring the mental and physical health of Columbia students. Some changes have been proposed to benefit students such as having JJ’s open for 22 hours a day and creating mental health workshops for ESC. Due to the input in this week’s meeting, it is expected that positive change will result from the student council’s initiatives.  

A somber tone settled over the ESC meeting yesterday evening when the Representative for International Students, Pranav Arora SEAS ’19, announced his resignation to the collected council. Yet ESC, as ever, marched forward to work through a meeting very much lacking in the theatrics with which we’ve recently been accustomed.

President and Policy

Executive President Neha Jain and Executive VP for Policy Sidney Perkins worked this week towards implementing student leader “gatekeeper training” sessions. Such training aims to educate individuals—in this case student leaders, undergraduate and graduate TAs, and COÖP and NSOP leaders—of suicide prevention techniques to create a safety net, of sorts, for commonly affected swathes of the student population. These sessions would be similar to current SVR requirements in length and necessity.

Otherwise, VP Perkins met with CCE to discuss the response from the CCE Survey. In his own words, Perkins referred to the meeting in that “it was really frustrating.” The Policy representatives were questioned why they even authored the report in the first place, that CCE knew about the issues with career representation and CCE function in general but had no concrete plans to resolve them. When Perkins suggested that CCE incorporate students who already have relationships with these desired companies, the CCE administrators announced,  “wow, why haven’t we thought of that!”

What else happened?

Feb

17

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Dear Vape God,

Who are you? What inspired you to engrave your dankness upon the driven snow? I could only imagine the scene, a bundled figure at the peak of the blizzard, staring towards the North Star while dramatic clouds blend into the snowy sky. And you would be alone, of course, because you’re a Vape God. And that’s not something you can just scream to the world. Who would understand your world of mods, your custom built rig, your dank homegrown vape trick Vine account. This is the life you’ve chosen, after all. The road you follow is paved with good intentions, but is so often obscured in the incipient haze of life. Are you in an EC Highrise single right now, projecting vaporwave mixes onto your wall? Or are you an alt denizen from across Broadway, leaving your tag on some faraway hold? Regardless, for one crystallized moment in the calm after the storm, we admired your art. Surely such creations are not meant to last, but your legend lives on in all of us.

Dank clouds via Bwog Staff

Feb

14

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It’s hard managing money. It’s even harder finding someone willing to give you money.

This week’s ESC meeting mainly focused on the council’s participation with administration to address the recent mental health crisis at Columbia. Discussions regarding the proper use of Columbia club bank accounts were also mentioned. 

During yesterday’s Engineering Student Council (ESC) meeting, Executive President Neha Jain announced that the E-Board would be meeting with a number of deans to discuss ESC’s 10 page addendum to the University Senate’s Student Affairs Committee memorandum to the President. The goal of the upcoming meeting, Jain said, is to discuss the issues and suggestions outlined in the addendum, essentially ensuring that the deans and ESC are both on the same page. Jain also mentioned that they would be meeting with the graduate engineering student council to talk about better training for TAs, so that more faculty may be able to better respond to mental health issues among the undergraduate student body.

Multiple council members questioned whether the Administration was receptive to these discussions, prompting Jain to explain that the email the E-Board received had been CC’d to all of the deans involved, “which is unique.” She overall believes that they are taking it seriously and “are receptive to hearing us.” University Senator Izzet Kebudi clarified some aspects of the University Senate’s administrative outreach as well, noting that the Office of University Life, led by Suzanne Goldberg, is the Senate’s main target. At the last plenary session, a certain amount of pressure was placed upon this office, with faculty representatives adding to suggestions made by the co-chairs of the Student Affairs Committee in regards to campus life and mental health. ESC’s addendum was among the strongest of all the addenda to the Student Affairs Committee’s memorandum, so Kebudi believes the administration will be responsive.

More administrative relations below

Feb

7

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Ooohhh the chandeliers

Ooohhh the chandeliers

Our next library review takes you to our most used and well-known places of study: Butler Library. It’s nice to be adventurous every once and awhile, but when you’re in sweatpants and just need to get down to business, Butler always has your back. 

Location: Eastern wing of the 6th floor of Butler. Accessible library.

Hours: 9 AM to 11 PM, Monday-Thursday. 9 AM to 9 PM, Friday. 11 AM to 6 PM, Saturday. Noon to 11 PM, Sunday. Note: This room is used for a payrology and epigraphy seminar each semester. This semester, the room is unavailible between 4 PM and 5:30 PM on Thursdays.

Contact: (212) 854-7309, [email protected], http://library.columbia.edu/locations/butler/papyrus.html

Seats:

  • Total: 14 Seats
  • Carrels: N/A
  • Comfy Chairs: 1 Seats
  • Computers: N/A
  • Tables: 13 Seats
  • Seats for Talking: 0 (this is a research reading room)

Memes in here

Feb

7

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img_0503

“We eagerly await action from the central administration, and we hope and pray that our efforts may help save the lives of our peers, colleagues, and friends.”

This week’s ESC meeting was a continuation of last week’s discussion that attempted to find ways to alleviate the stress of Columbia students. While the Columbia Administration acknowledged the Executive Vice President Sidney Perkins ideas, it remains uncertain if the administration will take student proposals into consideration. 

Yesterday’s weekly meeting of the Engineering Student Council quickly established itself as a spiritual continuation of last week’s meeting, with Executive Vice President for Policy Sidney Perkins first detailing the results of last week’s poignant resolution. VP Perkins recounted how the University Senate reached out to ESC after the Senate’s Student Affairs Committee (SAC) published a private memorandum regarding mental health conditions on campus. ESC was asked to provide an addendum to this private memorandum, prompting ESC’s Policy Committee to perform quite a bit of outreach in the compilation of a 10 page document.

The Addendum, which VP Perkins explained “should be entirely public,” consisted of suggestions “to prevent and respond to such tragedies on campus.” The preface to the document (linked here and included below) heralds how “no student should ever feel that their only escape from the pressures and stresses of Columbia is to be found in death,” and identifies three areas where “suicide prevention” intersects with “student wellness”: exorbitant student academic stress, a lack of student spaces dedicated to mindfulness and identity, and widespread feelings of student isolation.

9 Tails Beast Mode Here

Jan

31

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Amsterdam in the evening.

Amsterdam in the evening.

We know Butler, Avery, and the gaping hole in Barnard’s campus that once was Barnard Library. Bwog continues to review amazing libraries by taking a look into the Social Work Library!

Location: 2nd Floor, School of Social Work, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue (between 120th and 121st). Accessible library.

Hours: Monday, 10 AM to 8 PM. Tuesday-Thursday, 10 AM to 9 PM. Friday-Saturday, 10 AM to 6 PM. Sunday, 12 PM to 8 PM.

Contact: (212) 851-2194, [email protected]http://socialwork.columbia.edu/the-student-experience/student-support-services/social-work-library/

Seats:

  • Total: ~100 Seats (including seats in reading and group study rooms)
  • Carrels: 8 Seats
  • Comfy Chairs: 14 Seats
  • Computers: 25 Seats
  • Tables: 32 Seats
  • VHS TVs: 2 Seats
  • Seats for Talking: ~15 (There are multiple group study rooms available)

More about the library

Jan

31

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Too many administrators are probably scarred from stepping on these as a kid.

Too many administrators are probably scarred from stepping on these as a kid.

Columbia University has been known for exhibiting one of the worst stress cultures at any university in the country. Executive Vice President Sidney Perkins has plans to create change through legos and other de-stress initiatives. It’s up to the Columbia Administration to decide the future of our community. 

Engineering Student Council led one of its most intriguing sessions yesterday after Executive Vice President for Policy Sidney Perkins introduced his “Resolution on the Community Dissonance between Student Leaders and Administrators, which Contributes to a Culture of Stress on Columbia’s Campus.” Before explaining this resolution, included below, I believe it important to clarify the context leading up to Perkins’ (theatrical) presentation of his resolution. Last week, Perkins reported on the Columbia Administration’s rejection of his proposal to place legos in Carleton Commons. He expanded upon the parameters of that rejection last night, beginning with the scope of his “lego plan.” During our Fall Break, Perkins gathered some of his childhood legos (and some other non-lego-looking playthings), labelled the box at the MakerSpace, and presented his self-funded “destress station” to what he thought would be enthusiastic and cheery administrators. Instead, the unfeeling cogs of the Columbia Administration shattered his idealism.

In response, the Administration demanded a fully outlined proposal with information regarding who will maintain the lego box, who will set up the “destress stations,” and who will ensure everything is being used correctly. Despite acquiescing to these bureaucratic dictates, Perkins stated that the proposal “was ruminated upon for about a month and then rejected,” with the Administration stating that Perkins’ plan was an “inappropriate use of space.” The Administration’s treatment of Perkins drove him to contextualise the legos conundrum in a theatrical introduction to his “Resolution on Community Dissonance.” While emphatically shaking the box of legos, Perkins stressed that this resolution “addresses more than legos, though [he] thinks legos is the test case.” Without a working projector, Perkins read aloud the resolution, further extending the captivating performance.

What did the resolution say?

Jan

24

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Look at all of that free (air) space!

Look at all of that free (air) space!

Last night, ESC discussed possibilities for LGBT and People of Color spaces in Lerner Hall. Despite detailed plans for the creation of free spaces, ESC and the future of this proposition remains uncertain. 

The premier discussion at this week’s Engineering Student Council meeting involved a proposal by CCSC 2017 VP Brennon Mendez and 2020 Representative Grant Pace to pressure Columbia administration into transforming the two large spaces left from the removal of the Lerner mail space. These two spaces, according to VP Mendez, can be transformed into dedicated spaces specifically for LGBTQ students as well as “students of colour.” The LGBTQ space, at least, would take the place of the Donald Stevenson LGBT lounge in Furnald, a former utility closet granted to the LGBT Columbia community in 1972. For 45 years without change, the LGBT lounge has stored historical Columbia documents dating back to 1967 and has provided a reputedly small and dark, non-residential space for Columbia’s LGBT community. When queried about transitioning into a LGBT lounge area, the Columbia President at the time allegedly stated that “the university does not owe a lounge to gay students for their ‘cultural activities.'” VP Mendez made sure to note the irony of providing a former closet to the “out-of-closet” community.

Besides providing some sort of community space, this proposal included a centralizing effort to bring the administrators who work with LGBT students and “communities of colour” into more permanent, more centralized, and larger spaces. Although the degeneration of Lerner Hall into a bureaucratic complex may have originated in such hybridizing plans, the CCSC proposers relied on experiences of the bogged down and enclosed offices of administrators placed in Columbia property such as the Intercultural Resource Center (IRC) to push for this bureaucratic recentralization. Pace concluded the presentation with anecdotes from newly matriculated students on campus who would appreciate such a space for their personal growth.

What were the issues, if any, with the proposal?

Jan

21

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We're Fayerweather fans, but Schermerhorn isn't really that bad either.

We’re Fayerweather fans, but Schermerhorn isn’t really that bad either.

Continuing with our series on underutilized but fully available Columbia libraries, Bwog next spotlights a library tucked away in Schermerhorn—the Geology Library. Though often eclipsed by the artsy and sophisticated Avery Library, the Geology Library proffers a legitimate substitution to the soul sucking lower bowels of Butler and the superficiality of Avery.

Location: 601 Schermerhorn. Accessible library.

Hours: Monday-Thursday, 9 AM to 7 PM. Friday, 9 AM to 5 PM. Saturday-Sunday, 12 PM to 5 PM.

Contact: (212) 854-4713;[email protected]; http://library.columbia.edu/locations/science-engineering/about.html#geology

Seats:

  • Total: 26 Seats
  • Carrels: 11 Seats
  • Tables: 8 Seats
  • Computer Booths: 5 Seats
  • Overstuffed Chairs: 2 Seats
  • Seats for Talking: 0 (no talking zones)

Geology is a cool science ngl

Dec

22

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In our hearts, M2M is never closed

In our hearts, M2M is never closed

As many of us are aware, M2M recently pulled its health rating up from a C to a B. So, does that make it worth visiting? Or have its cheap Asian snack foods and underutilized seating area held allure all along? Internal editor Finn Klauber defends this hidden gem.

Look, I get it. M2M is just that weird Asian store tucked into an alcove on Broadway with a C (now a B!) health rating. And you’re probably just another middle class, non-Asian kid whose experiences with blue collar grime consist of leaving Bel Air on the freeway or standing in line behind some scary New Yorker when trying to buy beer at the NSOP Yankees game excursion. Why would you go to M2M? Sweetgreen is just twenty feet away, after all. Nothing screams out “new experiences” like spending more than 10 dollars on the luxury of an artisanal salad.

But, honestly, you don’t know what you’re missing out on. M2M is the hidden gem of the Morningside food and snack community, and it’s a shame that so few Columbia students see that C or B and decide to keep walking on. I was that Columbia student once, I know what it’s like. But M2M has a way of worming itself into your heart.

See, in the varying states of consciousness in which I’ve perused row after row of strangely detailed products packed with color, I have never been disappointed in my choices. Without engaging in a fetishization of East Asian culture, it is entirely appropriate to wonder at the vastly different trajectory on which Asian junk food developed opposed to that of our Western dominated culture. And M2M has managed to assemble the greatest collection of such delectable treats in the near Upper West Side. All you have to do is look inside.

So, what exactly is so great about M2M’s snack collection?

Dec

11

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The best type of finals alcohol.

The best type of finals alcohol.

Bucket List represents the intellectual privilege we enjoy as Columbia students. We do our very best to bring to your attention important guest lecturers and special events on campus. Our recommendations for this sparsely populated reading week are below, with no specifically recommended events. If you notice any events that have been left off the list, or a correction, please leave them in the comments.

Monday, December 12th

  • “The Transmission of Knowledge: Tool Use and Cognition” 4:00-6:00 PM, Faculty House. Nicola Clayton, Alex Martin, Ian Tattersall.
  • “American Democracy Under Threat?” 4:10-6:30 PM, Event Oval, The Diana, Barnard College. Michael Gerrard, Alexander Cooley, Mae Ngai, Jack Halberstam.

Tuesday, December 13th

  • “US Presidential Election: The View from Japan” 12:00-1:30 PM, 918 IAB. Hitoshi Tanaka, Takako Hikotani.

Wednesday, December 14th

  • “Student Discussion on Human Rights Post-Election” 1:00-2:00 PM, 513 Fayerweather Hall.

Thursday, December 15th

  • “OPEC Secretary General H.E. Mohammad Sanusi Barkindo” 9:30-11:00 AM, Presidential Room 1, Faculty House. H.E. Mohammed Barkindo (RSVP).
  • “Rethinking Victorian Individualism” 5:30-8:00 PM, 411 Fayerweather Hall. Anna Clark.

Friday, December 16th

  • “How to Hold a Dead Star in Your Hand” 7:00-9:00 PM, 301 Pupin Hall. Kimberly Arcand.

Dec

6

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ESC is keeping campus running smooth with the latest innovation, tampon boxes in bathrooms campus-wide.

ESC is keeping campus running smooth with the latest innovation, tampon boxes in bathrooms campus-wide.

Tampons, smoking bans, and tree lighting malfunctions, Oh my! A lot happened in this week’s ESC meeting. Let Finn Klauber recount the details of some important, new innovations coming to a bathroom near you very soon.

The student council initiative first spearheaded last year by CCSC President Ben Makansi and VP for Policy Viv Ramakrishnan to provide free tampons and pads to Columbia’s student population won a second round of support last night. In support of authorizing a tripartite, Council-led, pilot program for the upcoming semester, CCSC Executive VP for Policy Abby Porter and CCSC Student Services Rep Sam Safari presented an initiative blueprint already approved by CCSC.

The initiative, Abby and Sam explained, would pick up upon programs already in place at other schools, such as Brown, NYU, and the New York public school system, to stock pad and tampon boxes in specific bathrooms across Columbia proper for public consumption. After meeting with Columbia Health and Scott Wright of Student Services, CCSC attained substantive administrative support for this pilot program in the form of Student Services taking responsibility for installing the sanitary supply boxes in agreed locations. Student council members, in exchange, will take responsibility for collecting data on tampon and pad usage while also restocking the supplies, which the Councils will be responsible for purchasing. The proposed financial burden on each Council would amount to $210.96 from ESC, $622.32 from CCSC, and $221.51 from GSSC—though GSSC will vote upon the proposal later today. However, any money unused in the purchase of sanitary supplies will be returned to the Councils as appropriate. The list of buildings receiving tampon and pad boxes is as follows:

The list of locations after the jump

Dec

4

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Come see this loser talk about how he's not really wrong when he was actually completely, 100% wrong.

Come see this loser talk about how he’s not really wrong when he was completely 100% wrong.

Bucket List represents the intellectual privilege we enjoy as Columbia students. We do our very best to bring to your attention important guest lecturers and special events on campus. Our recommendations for this week are below, and the full list is after the jump. If you notice any events that have been left off the list, or a correction, please leave them in the comments.

Recommended

  • “Data, Polling, the Media and Democracy: A panel discussion of Election 2016” Tuesday, 5:30-7:00 PM, Rotunda, Low Library. Nate Silver, Emily Bell, Robert Shapiro (RSVP).
  • “#bringbackourgirls: A discourse in Islamist militancy in Africa” Tuesday, 6:00-7:00 PM, 607B Pulitzer Hall. Helon Habila, Brian Larkin, Shobana Shankar, Nicholas Lemann (RSVP).
  • “The Gendered Road to STEM Engagement: Psychosocial factors contributing to academic and social engagement among women in STEM fields” Wednesday, 4:10-5:10 PM, 614 Schermerhorn. Bonita London.
  • “Sanctuary: Social, Legal, and Historical Perspectives on an Activist Category” Thursday, 6:00-8:00 PM, Held Lecture Hall, Barnard College. Alexandra Délano Alonso, Eric Foner, Alyshia Gálvez, Elora Mukherjee, JC Salyer (RSVP).

Full list here->

Nov

28

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Plasmate Caeles

Plasmate Caeles

Bucket List represents the intellectual privilege we enjoy as Columbia students. We do our very best to bring to your attention important guest lecturers and special events on campus. Our recommendations for this week are below, and the full list is after the jump. If you notice any events that have been left off the list, or a correction, please leave them in the comments.

Recommended

  • “The Alternative Folklore of the Region – Hard Mountain Rap, Vintage Feminism and Filthy Karpaty Hip Hop” Tuesday, 12:00-1:30 PM, 1219 IAB. Lucia Nimcova.
  • “Salvaging Syria: A Talk with Ambassador Ghadbian (of the National Coalition of Syrian Revolution and Opposition Forces)” Tuesday, 8:00-9:30 PM, 501 Schermerhorn Hall. Dr. Najib Ghadbian, Special Representative to the United Nations and the United States for the National Coalition of Syrian Revolution and Opposition Forces.
  • “Citizen Subject: A Conversation with Etienne Balibar” Wednesday, 6:00-8:00 PM, 2nd Floor Common Room, Heyman Center for the Humanities. Etienne Balibar.
  • “Sounding China in the World: A Workshop on Musical Circulations to and from China from the Qing Dynasty Through the Present” Friday, 9:30 AM – 5:30 PM, 701C Dodge Hall. (Speakers).
  • “Coupling of Atmospheric Regions by Transient Plasmas” Friday, 2:00-3:00 PM, 214 Mudd Hall. Dr. Caitano L. da Silva.

Full list after the jump

Nov

22

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ESC sure discussed some important issues before Break.

ESC sure discussed some important issues before Break.

Sit back as Finn Klauber recounts the important proposals discussed at last night’s ESC meeting. Topics discussed varied from concerns over completing CS major requirements, getting the Wednesday before Thanksgiving off next year, and funding for campus organizations. 

Yesterday evening’s Engineering Student Council meeting strayed away from controversial discussions or proposals, instead focusing on a group discussion apropos of the unnecessary burdens Columbia places on SEAS Computer Science majors. Executive VP for Student Life Piyushi Bishnoi, with support from Executive VP for Communication Anthony Kim, is heading an effort to demonstrate to the Administration just how serious of a situation this is to SEAS students.

Members of ESC pointed out how the CS department seems to have a deflated point attribution—while Art of Engineering is a 4 point class, Fundamentals of Computer Science only provides 3 points. 2017 Class Rep Harry Munroe plainly asked what the fundamental problems are with department, drawing VP Kim to explain how the CS department has issues with hiring professors to meet CS needs. The number of students in CS waxes and wanes over time, meaning careless hiring choices could hurt Columbia more than help it. Furthermore, some professors are “research professors” only allotted a class or two, unless Columbia CS wants to pay these professors premiums to teach a greater number of classes. 2018 Class President Aakanxit Khullar asked for clarification specifically on how seniors are not able to register for necessary classes in the department, which was explained as the specific tracks within the CS department varying in terms of the actual number of listed courses that are actually given. In other words, VP Bishnoi summed up, students don’t feel like they can actually fulfill the requirements for CS.

What about the Finance?

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