Feb

1

Tips and Tricks: The Poor Man’s Netflix

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Just last semester the Bwog discovered how to get an unlimited supply of free dvds delivered to the building across the street complete with a friendly reminder to come get your movies and a one-week renewable loan period.

Follow along and you’ll never pay retail again.

1. Get a public library card. Apply for one online and have it mailed to you in two weeks or just walk into the Morningside Branch with a piece of mail adressed to you and get it on the spot. If you don’t know where the Morningside Branch is, you actually need less dvds and more time out of the house.

2. Log into LEO, CLIO’s ugly sister.

3. Go to the catalog and search for movies. Poke around and you’ll discover that between its 80+ branches, the New York Public Library has pretty much anything you could want. If they don’t, you didn’t really want it anyway.

4. Take the plunge and click on “Request Item.” Don’t let a small number of “Reservalbe Copies” and a high “Number of Holds” deter you– movie requests stay good up to a year. Think of the surprise when you get an email next September telling you King Kong just came in.

5. Tell LEO to send the movie to Morningside Heights and to notify you by “MAIL”. Apparently, MAIL is New York Public Library for email.

6. Lather, rinse, repeat. Put as many movies on hold as you want. Just know that they show up rather fast– 2-4 days if a copy is free– so don’t commit yourself to watching too many.

7. When a movie comes in, you’ll get an email from the library saying so. Appear at the checkout desk with library card in hand and be sure to mutter a quiet “Screw you” to Netflix under your breath as you walk out.

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2 Comments

  1. Izumi

    yes, this is wonderful. but i think lydia will agree with me when i say that the seattle public library system can't be beat.



    and i am still, like, 457th on the holds list for the Incredibles.

  2. Cody Hess

    Brilliant! Bwog is already useful.

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