Feb

23

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Lily Donaldson strutting the streets of Paris in mom jeans with slightly less tapered, straighter legs

The year is 2017. Skinny, low/mid-rise jeans are fuckin’ dead as disco. Mom jeans are coming back in a big fuckin’ way. Reminiscent of the 80’s and 90’s, mom jeans are characterized by their high waistlines, butt-hugging behinds, and tapered-but-not-tight legs. Usually (but not always) seen in a lighter wash, mom jeans accentuate your butt and thighs, elongate your crotch, and cinch your waist, for a weirdly very flattering fit. I personally prefer mom jeans that don’t have stretch, because high-waisted jeans that are too stretchy don’t give me a sense of sturdy security that stiff denim gives me.

You can find good, stiff, light-wash, tapered mom jeans at thrift stores like Buffalo Exchange or L Train Vintage for relatively cheap. I own two pairs, both of which I bought from an admittedly (sometimes) overpriced thrift shopping app called Depop. One is a pair of silver-tab Levi’s jeans that are a little looser at the thigh and therefore have have more of that carrot shape. The other is a pair of Calvin Klein jeans that are a little tighter at the thighs and (I think) flatter my legs better.

Kendall Jenner in mom jeans with a slimmer silhouette

My Calvin Klein jeans are my favorite jeans ever, although I also love my Levi’s. The CK ones are buttery soft but perfectly sturdy (although one time when things were heating up with a boy he managed to tear off a belt loop and I had to sew it on when I got back to my room at 4am) and perfectly worn in. They were rather long on me when I bought them in their original state, so I cut the legs a bit to fit me better because I don’t have a sewing machine and am too lazy to take them to a tailor.

More about the intricate art of mom jeans

Feb

22

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Self-proclaimed “liberal snowflake” tackles the case for Trump.

Dinesh D’Souza, conservative writer, scholar, public intellectual, and filmmaker, spoke at Columbia on Tuesday. During this talk, he emphasized the dark history of the Democratic Party and worked to delegitimize the oft-repeated comparisons between Donald Trump and the likes of Mussolini and Hitler. Bwog sent Hillary-fanatic and proud leftist snowflake, Vivian Klotz, to cover the event. Her favorite moment of the evening was when D’Souza described Trump’s motivation as, “naked and forward thrusting.”

Dinesh D’Souza, like many of his conservative peers, seems most perturbed by the apparent lack of conservative viewpoints expressed in the media and in schools. Despite power resting in the hands of Republicans in the newly elected, unified government, he worries that the narratives expressed in schools across the country are only those of liberal academics, to the point that many students would be hard-pressed to describe what exactly conservatives are trying to conserve. This is dangerous, he warns, for if you can’t talk about these issues in an academic setting, they may never be considered appropriate to discuss and debate.

Before getting to his core argument, D’Souza laid a groundwork for his speech by examining the circumstances that led to Trump’s victory. He cited the president’s ability to court “Reagan Democrats” in a way that Republicans haven’t been able to since 1984, an issue explained by the notion that, “There is no place in the ‘liberal multicultural tent’ for white, working-class Americans.” D’Souza dismissed the idea that the popular vote is at all worth noting; the American people agreed upon the system of the electoral college, and now must abide by it, regardless of whether it fits their preferences in a given year.

So how did D’Souza defend Trump?

Feb

22

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A commissioned portrait of Vuslat Doǧan Sabanci at a sunny desk Turkey

Vuslat Doǧan Sabanci That’s way neater than prezbo’s de

Vuslat Doǧan Sabanci, SIPA ’96 and the chairwoman of the Turkish news giant Hürriyet, came to Columbia as part of the World Leader’s Forum to discuss the connection between Islam and the media, and her personal experience as a self-proclaimed moderate Muslim.

“I am a Muslim woman,” Vuslat Doǧan Sabanci proclaimed to start her address in Low Library. After President Bollinger gave the introduction to “Fostering a Better Conversation and Understanding of Islam: The Vital Role of Media,” Doǧan Sabanci spoke about her view of the responsibilities of the East and West to combat Islamophobia and its effects. The event ended with a (relatively hostile) Q&A session with Doǧan Sabanci and Bollinger.

(Before I begin actual coverage, I would like to highlight the very first stumbling words out of PrezBo’s mouth at the event: “The Columbia Worlds Forum- World Forum… World Leaders Forum.”)

The most important thing in Doǧan Sabanci’s CV, according to her on Tuesday, was not her feminist activism or media accomplishments, but, “Of course, it is being a Columbia graduate.” When she graduated 21 years ago, she was convinced that globalism would lead to the world’s nations becoming one happy family. However, countries have instead retreated, becoming “hostile villages.” The new media led to accelerated polarization, and “attention became the new currency” for the media. Digital media did not fulfill its promise of promoting communication. Doǧan Sabanci targeted communication, between individuals and civilizations, as the key to successful Globalization. Her keys for better conversations included listening attentively, acknowledging each other, and displaying compassion.

Islamophobia and more after the jump

Feb

22

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Should we be going on a cruise if we have been cruising through our last semester?

GSSC’s meeting yesterday was quite a ride! Bureau Chiefs Romane Thomas and Jennifer Nugent report on all the ups and downs.

Last night, GSSC talked food insecurity, senior cruise and appointments.

First up, GS Senator Curtis updated the council about the food bank. He praised Michael Higgins for his work to get the food bank running. Curtis explained that the food bank is looking to submit a business plan specifically as a non-profit. Concomitantly, the senate is currently working with students with disabilities. In coordination with Scott Wright and Sue Lee, Curtis has worked to include disabilities into the core curriculum through disability specific classes.

Vincente from CU FLIP appeared in front of council last night to request a partnership with GSSC. Raisa Flor introduced the FLIP app which allows individuals to share their extra meal swipes with other students in need. The app can also be used to showcase events that offer free food. Vincente pointed out that confidentiality is a crucial aspect of this initiative since food insecurity remains a very stigmatized topic. He also explained to a GSSC council member that the FLIP community regulated itself through a flagging process. After three members flag a post, it will automatically be taken down. The council approved the partnership and is also hoping to use the platform as a way of gathering data on food insecurity at Columbia.

What else happened?

Feb

22

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Happening in the world: Trump condemned anti-semitism during a visit to the National Museum of African-American History and Culture, noting the need to combat hatred “in all of its very ugly forms.” This was one day after 11 bomb threats were made to various Jewish community centers around the country and a Jewish cemetery in University City, Mo. was vandalized. Trump further said that these events are a “very sad reminder of the work that must still be done to root out hate and prejudice and evil.” (NYT)

Happening in NYC: A restaurant in Midtown Manhattan, Brasserie Restaurant TSQ, caught on fire around 5am Tuesday morning, closing off 7th Avenue just north of Times Square. Witnesses describe seeing “embers come up a 45-foot billboard.” Two people were injured in the fire, which also spread to two buildings. Firefighters were able to quickly subdue the fire, but two buildings were left in ruins. (ABC)

Happening on campus: Columbia University’s Undergraduate Law Review is hosting a free LSAT seminar today 8pm-9pm in Hamilton 702. Food will be provided!

Overheard: “I’m just your professor, not your shrink.”

An old celeb tweet: 

 

 

 

 

 

Relatable content via Twitter

Feb

21

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Too cool to keep warm

Last weekend’s weather was great. We were all excited to tan our hairy legs after seeing the sun for the first time since October. But it seems that while some of us were busting out our Chubbies shorts, others had bigger plans to cherish those 12 hours of 65 degrees.

Last night, around 8 pm, a black convertible BMW was seen parked outside of Barnard dorm 616. By then, the weather had definitely changed from South Beach to South Ferry—a chilly 46 degrees—so we totally understand why the driver was snuggled up in a cozy Canada Goose.

But all understanding goes out the window (literally) when we wonder why he had the top down. He was revving his engine pretty frequently; perhaps he broke a sweat from pressing the gas so much and needed to cool off?

Photo via Bwog Staff

Feb

21

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Trying so hard to just make sense of it all.

You meet a cute guy in your class. You introduce yourself, talk casually about the class, and hope that you don’t expel verbal vomit. The conversation continues as you continue to talk after class,  joke about the professor and complain about the work load. You become suspicious of your present circumstances as the universe appears to be working in your favor. Everything goes well until he drops the smallest but most crucial detail. Your first-year hopes shatter as he drops the nuke of all nukes: 

He’s a GS student. 

GS is a mixed bag. Whether they are fresh out of high school or 35 and married with three kids, there needs to be a way to figure out the only important question: How old are they? Bwog is here to help out the entire Columbia community with some hard hitting calculations!

The math stuff after the jump

Feb

21

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Let’s stop food insecurity together.

This week’s SGA meeting focused on food insecurity and plans to make Barnard students healthier. Changes to Barnard’s rule on “double-swiping” and the introduction of the Share Meals app have been proposed. 

This week, SGA finally took a break from it’s endless line of administrative guests and strike frenzy to focus on….nothing much. Barnard’s Rep Council had one thing on their agenda tonight, which was hearing a proposal about approval of implementing and supporting the Share Meals app at Columbia. The app, which was first created at NYU by Jon Chin, provides students who are experiencing food insecurity and students with extra meal swipes a way to connect.

More on the SGA meeting after the jump

Feb

21

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JJ’s 22 hours a day would be a blessing and a curse.

This week, ESC mainly touched upon ensuring the mental and physical health of Columbia students. Some changes have been proposed to benefit students such as having JJ’s open for 22 hours a day and creating mental health workshops for ESC. Due to the input in this week’s meeting, it is expected that positive change will result from the student council’s initiatives.  

A somber tone settled over the ESC meeting yesterday evening when the Representative for International Students, Pranav Arora SEAS ’19, announced his resignation to the collected council. Yet ESC, as ever, marched forward to work through a meeting very much lacking in the theatrics with which we’ve recently been accustomed.

President and Policy

Executive President Neha Jain and Executive VP for Policy Sidney Perkins worked this week towards implementing student leader “gatekeeper training” sessions. Such training aims to educate individuals—in this case student leaders, undergraduate and graduate TAs, and COÖP and NSOP leaders—of suicide prevention techniques to create a safety net, of sorts, for commonly affected swathes of the student population. These sessions would be similar to current SVR requirements in length and necessity.

Otherwise, VP Perkins met with CCE to discuss the response from the CCE Survey. In his own words, Perkins referred to the meeting in that “it was really frustrating.” The Policy representatives were questioned why they even authored the report in the first place, that CCE knew about the issues with career representation and CCE function in general but had no concrete plans to resolve them. When Perkins suggested that CCE incorporate students who already have relationships with these desired companies, the CCE administrators announced,  “wow, why haven’t we thought of that!”

What else happened?

Feb

21

Written by

Who needs Low Beach when you can have the actual beach?

Happening in the world: British parliament is debating whether or not they will allow President Trump to come to the UK on a formal visit. An online petition is circulating on the web that aims to not accept Trump to prevent “embarrassment to Her Majesty the queen.” (NY Times)

Happening in NYC: Eleven passengers at JFK walked through TSA security without being properly screened. The TSA is reviewing the incident and has identified the passengers that didn’t go through the screening. The agency has ensured that this was an isolated incident. (NY Daily News)

Happening on campus: From 6:00-7:15 tonight at Low Library is a talk entitled, “Fostering a Better Conversation and Understanding of Islam: The Vital Role of Media.” Haven’t seen PrezBo in awhile? President Bollinger will have the opening remarks. Click here for more information.

Overseen/Overheard: “Stanley Tucci in The Lovely Bones is a daddy.”

Music Pick: Feel those good vibes with Oasis’ (What’s The Story) Morning Glory?

A Summer Preview via Bwogger Victoria Arancio

 

 

Feb

20

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Low Beach or South Beach?

Spring has sprung, Columbia! We hope you were able to spend some much-needed time outside this weekend enjoying the beautiful weather. But, if you weren’t, you were probably getting drunk and finding yourself in weird situations. Maybe all of the above. Here are this weekend’s field notes

Spring Break?:

  • Went to a beach back home and got caught trespassing. The cop gave me a $75 parking ticket.
  • Got day drunk on Saturday and blacked out between 6 and 7 pm, apparently took a shower with my friend, then made my way (alone) from NYU to 72nd street and Broadway, somehow transferring from the NQR to the 123 but I have no recollection.
  • Went gallery hopping on Thursday. Got pretty drunk on the free wine. Ran into girl who’s friends with my old roommate, had awkward conversation in which I think she implied my roommate really disliked me but can’t be sure because was drunk.
  • Went to Long Island for the tail end of President’s weekend where I got wine drunk and passed out with Montaigne and my anxiety meds in the sun room.
  • Visited DUMBO, Brooklyn with my best friends!
  • Saw a pug in DUMBO and screamed “DUMBO PUGGO!”
  • Went to Massachusetts, where there’s still so much snow on the ground! Neat.

There is literally no unifying theme here (except maybe alcohol):

  • Bought my friend drinks and she accidentally venmo’d me $300 instead of $30 to pay me back.
  • Played four square. But not middle school four square – adult four square. The kind of four square that can leave the floor of an EC suite absolutely soaked in alcohol.
  • Got a Tinder after a long period of wishing I met more people but not doing anything about it. Already hate it and have received a number of vulgar comments.
  • Got really high and watched Psycho. 11/10 would recommend.
  • A mouse died in my room, took us almost 24 hours to figure out the source of the smell (RIP).
  • Took a shit in a West Elm bathroom.
  • Ate at another college’s dining hall, and they were just serving mac and cheese. Nothing else.
  • Forced 90+ fraternity guys to sit and listen to talks about queering Greek life and trans inclusivity.
  • Went to a glow stick and then toga party in EC wearing a lax pinnie which got me into yet another confrontation in Mel’s.
  • Got an email from my French professor asking why I half-ass my online homework.

Feb

20

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Service Alert! Welcome to Carman Hall.

If you’ve waltzed into Carman any time in the past few weeks, you’ve probably noticed that the elevators are pretty fucked up. And we’re pretty tired of it. So we decided it was high time for a callout…

Over the weekend, I was sitting in my Carman suite watching Netflix and enjoying a breezy afternoon. Then I get a call from my roommate telling me that she’s downstairs in the lobby with four six-packs of [redacted] and all three elevators are broken. She needs me to come down and help her carry them up the stairs.

Are you kidding me, Carman Hall? The two lobby elevators are broken and the freight elevator isn’t running? What kind of an institution is this? Do you even realize how much tuition we’re all paying? Nevermind the crumbling ceiling tiles, cockroaches, and puke-stained carpets. All of that I can live with. But no elevators? This is taking Carman to a new extreme.

Read more of our rant.

Feb

20

Written by

From the outside looking in

From the outside looking in

Monday mornings bring CCSC swarming—over issues of transparency, accountability, and passionate quotes. CCSC Bureau Chief Nadra Rahman reports.

In last night’s meeting of the Columbia College Student Council (CCSC): deliberations over Joint Council Co-Sponsorships and Grant Opportunities (JCCC) funding, spontaneous and spirited debates over transparency, and the unyielding force of VP Finance Anuj Sharma.

To Close Or Not To Close? That Is The Question
Last night’s meeting would have been relatively brief, if not for an unanticipated furor over the motion to close the meeting for the final discussion and vote over JCCC grants. On one side: defenders of transparency and accountability. On the other: people who value consistency and space for honesty.

At the start of the meeting, VP Finance Anuj Sharma announced that he would motion to close the meeting after the first JCCC presentation. When a hapless reporter asked why, when these discussions had previously been open, the room erupted into discussion, with USenator Sean Ryan leading the charge for open meetings. He was concerned about the constitutionality of the action and the sudden shift in rules, stating they should “always err on the side of keeping our meetings open.” Sharma countered by saying it had been a mistake to not close meetings earlier, especially since this would be in keeping with JCCC meeting procedure. He stressed the importance of being able to speak honestly and candidly about funding decisions, which would be difficult in front of an audience and furthermore, dismissed any constitutional issues. After this first round of debate, members still voted to close the meeting; the vote was close.

But things got even more heated

Feb

20

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A photo of Butler 209 devoid of students during Orgo Night Fall 2016

Wow, is 209 always this empty on a Thursday night?

Bwog is back with another installment of Library Reviews! Today, we take a look at a classic: Butler 209. Whether 209 is your go-to spot (*ahem* like me) or simply a relic of Orgo Nights past, join us on a journey through this age-old Butler classic. 

Location: Butler Library, Room 209. Enter Butler and turn either direction, following the hallway to the end. Accessible Library.

Hours: 209, like several other rooms in the Philip L. Milstein Family College Library, is open 24 hours a day. It is not open 24 hours a day during Spring Break. The Library’s service hours open at 9 am on school days, close 11 pm on school nights.

Contact: (212) 854-7309;[email protected];  http://library.columbia.edu/locations/undergraduate.html; @ColumbiaLib on Twitter, and gosh do they wish they were BarnLib.

Seats:

  • Total: 122 Seats
  • Tables: 86 Seats, 14 of which are at 2-seat tables.
  • Study Carrels: 14 Seats
  • Computers: 21 Seats
  • Stuffed Chairs: 1 Seat – it’s in the Southwest corner of the room.
  • Seats for Talking: 0 Seats. Take your commotion to ButCaf.

Tell me more about the zines!

Feb

20

Written by

Wow, the people of Southern California must really be loving this rain!

Happy Monday, y’all! This week, it seems as if midterms are beginning to creep upon us. You know what that means: shit. Yeah, you thought that was going to be something witty. Nope. Just shit. Anyway, here are your Bwoglines for today! 

Happening in the nation: It rained in California this weekend. Actually, let me rephrase that: It downpoured in California this weekend. Wait, ya know what, just one more try: All of Southern California is literally underwater. The region got over five inches of rain in one weekend, which doesn’t sound like that much (?) but apparently is. For all our Californians out there, we suggest Amazon Prime-ing this to your home address ASAP.

Happening in NYC: Another day, another rally. Yesterday, hundreds flooded Times Square (but not like usual) to protest the potential for a Muslim ban under the Trump administration. Mayor De Blasio was even in attendance. The rally, boasting the tagline “I Am A Muslim Too,” was a massive display of good ole New York solidarity.

Happening on campus: If you’ve been dying to learn more about Shabbat, you’re in luck! Tonight in the Kraft Center, Columbia/Barnard Hillel is hosting an event to teach you (yes, you!) the ins and outs of Shabbat. Stop by Kraft 6A at 7:30 to hear what they have to say!

Overheard: While at the Liberty Gala on Friday night… “I’m NOT Jewish! I got a nose job to prove it!”

Found this video in the depths of reddit while wicked stoned. Get ready to flip your shit. 

The Seas Strangest Square Mile from Shark Bay Films on Vimeo.

Photo of man loving Southern California via Stockfresh

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