Oct

23

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Another weekend, another list of regrettable endeavors performed by yours truly, the staff of Bwog. Sit down, relax, and enjoy the tales and mistakes we made over the past weekend.

Look out SEAS: we have a new generation of individuals who are engineering our future, one pad at a time.

Bwog and Relationships / Hooking Up:

  • Finally hooked up with someone I’ve been flirting with for weeks!
  • Hooked up with the guy i’ve been talking to two nights in a row!
  • Found out that a guy who brought my friend home from The Heights, matched with me on Bumble, and matched with my other friend on Tinder has a girlfriend.
  • Woke up to my roommate hooking up with a guy while I was in the room.
  • Set a new record for the nicest apartment i’ve hooked up with a girl in (Columbus Circle)
  • Found out my best friend has had mono for the past month; counseled her as she texted various boys to tell them.
  • Tried to end an unhealthy and unromantic relationship but found no closure.
  • Received the most mixed messages from a guy that I’ve ever gotten.

What else did Bwog do?

Oct

23

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These sweaters are warm and fuzzy, unlike flakes. (It’s the Facebook group’s cover photo.)

Everyone at this school is busy. Everyone’s time is valuable. Some people, however, seem to think their time is more valuable than others’. There is a specific group of people who seem to tend to do this a lot; people who flake on purchases on Buy Sell Trade at Barnard.

Picture this: you’re selling a pair of jeans. The thing about jeans is that their fits are often tricky, and you can’t just go by the size; you often have to try them on before you buy them. Which means you have to meet up with the buyer in a private place like your room, or someplace that has a restroom. It’s an entire process. You have to set up a time, and if you need to sign the buyer into your dorm, you have to come all the way to the lobby of your building, etc. And since everyone at this school is busy, setting up a good time to meet is often difficult.

So then somehow, you manage to find a half-hour pocket of time during which both you and the buyer are free. The buyer agrees to meet you in your dorm at 6pm. Perfect, because you have a meeting at 7pm. Even if she is 10-15 minutes late (which in my opinion is the maximum amount of socially acceptable tardiness) you will have ample time. She tells you at 5:55pm that her astronomy lab finishes at 6pm in Pupin, and you live in 110. Great, so it’s going to take her like 20 minutes to get here. She could have just asked to meet at 6:30pm, but that’s fine, you suppose, slightly cranky now.

What next?

Oct

23

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It’s time for me to speak up. Then down. Then back up again.

We received this op-ed to our tips email. We’re not sure how it was sent, but we’ve decided to publish it anyway. 

It’s actually insulting. While the multi-altitudinal debate between the so-called “floor-fivers” and the elevated elites has made it to the pages of the revered Spectator op-ed section, no one has had the intuition to ask me, the only one who has all the facts needed to respond, about what I think. Me, the rightward John Jay elevator.

I may not be able to go quite as high as my leftward associate, and I am getting a bit slow in my old age, but I’ve been there for you during 4 am laundry runs and I didn’t even complain when the JJ’s smoothie you stole for a mixer sloshed all over my weathered floor. I’m doing my best, but frankly, I don’t get enough credit for it. When was the last time you thanked me for being right on your floor when you were late to your 8:40? Or taking an irrational route just to set you up with the cutie on JJ10 you always avoid looking at whenever they walk in? You think I don’t notice, but I do. Instead of petty squabbles over the elevator privileges of those on the lower floors, maybe you should take some time to appreciate me.

Read more of John Jay elevator’s testimony here.

Oct

23

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As Columbia football players celebrate, one in the foreground holds up a baseball bat while he sticks out his tongue.

Defensive Lineman Alexander Holme is trying out for the baseball team.

It’s a common fallacy of sports journalism to rest an entire game on a single play. In a 60 minute (or 3 hour) game of football, a point scored on the opening play matters just as much to the final score as a point as the clock expires. If a last-second touchdown is a team’s last chance, then they had dozens of other chances beforehand.

In that sense, it’s not right to focus only on the final play of the Columbia Football team’s (6-0, 3-0 Ivy) victory over Dartmouth (5-1, 2-1 Ivy). The final play wouldn’t have mattered had Columbia not racked up four 3-and-outs during the last half, or had quarterback Anders Hill not lobbed the ball into triple coverage when the Lions had a chance to close out the game with ten minutes left in the fourth quarter. Similarly, Dartmouth could have made the last play irrelevant by converting their third down attempts (0 for 9 on the day), or by making a chip shot field goal at the end of the first half. And, per head coach Al Bagnoli, Dartmouth would have been stopped earlier were it not for an illegal block below the waist call made during that fateful final drive.

With all of those disclaimers in mind, the end of the Dartmouth game was an absolute mess.

Read more about the final controversial minutes here.

Oct

23

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In case you’ve been living under a rock or deactivated your Facebook after your relatives started commenting on all of your Photo Booth selfies from middle school, Columbia Crushes is the recent craze on campus, potentially replacing Columbia Buy Sell Memes as prime procrastination material. Earlier in the month, Bwogger Jenny Zhu and I looked into the inner workings of the popular page, currently being scrolled through by the people sitting around me in Butler, seeing what posts their friends tagged them in.

Columbia Crushes posted a request the other day that a guy, preferably tall or of medium height, comes to the math building to meet up. The anonymous submitter claimed that they would be there at 6:30pm in a red sweater.

What happened next?.

Oct

23

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Happening Around the World: The Italian regions of Veneto and Lombardy have voted in a referendum for greater autonomy from the Central Italian government. While turnout rates for both votes hovered around 50%, the vote for autonomy was astounding, with 98% and 95% voters backing it, respectively. This call for autonomy comes right after Catalonia’s own referendum which attempted to streamline independence from Spain. (NY Times)

Just another street waiting to be fucked over by Bill de Blasio.

Happening in the US: Justin Timberlake has been announced to be the performer at this year’s 52nd Super Bowl Halftime Show. This will be his second performance at the Super Bowl, with the first being in 2004 alongside Janet Jackson. (CNN)

Happening in the City: Mayor Bill de Blasio has revealed a plan to ease the congestion of Midtown traffic by imposing limitations on the times curbs can be used, creating new moving lanes for pedestrians and bikes, as well as doubling the amount of traffic enforcement within Midtown. This system is planned to be tested out on a few streets between 36th and 60th, and may be implemented across the city if considered a success. (ABC)

Happening on Campus: Interested in Asian-American relations and current issues facing Asian nations? “The Future of Asia: Voices of the Next Generation” is happening today from 12:00PM – 1:30PM in Room 1512 of the International Affairs Building! Panelists will lead discussions on topics that are pertinent to Asian countries today, and will look at intersections of identities and how they impact the future of the success of Asia.

Overheard: “I don’t think I can do my Econ problem sets with a Republican”

Song Recommendation: Ridin Round – Kali Uchis

Average Midtown street via StreetsBlog

Oct

22

A Bwogger getting drunk af circa freshman year

At a university like Columbia, where everyone is constantly under heavy academic pressure, many students choose to imbibe copious quantities of alcohol in order to chill out a little bit. Bwog Staff Writer Gabrielle Kloppers investigates the volumes involved, using a thoroughly scientific method.

First of all, we need to separate Columbia Students into categories, or classes of drinkers. I will be separating into three primary groups: the goodie-goodies, the philosophers, and the drunkest-one-at-the-party.

The goodie-goodie doesn’t drink much; maybe they’ll have a glass of wine with dinner, or a nice mixed-drink (with actually expensive liquor…). They would never be seen at 1020 on a Tuesday night. Their estimated alcohol consumption would be at around 50 ml hard liquor (from their cheeky scotch on the rocks after their last midterm), and a standard glass of wine (150ml) per month. They don’t enjoy getting insane. So, over the course of the year, they would consume around 12 x 50 = 600 ml of hard liquor and 150 x 12 = 1800 ml of wine per year. That comes out to a little less than a 2L bottle of wine (which for some of us is indulgence for only one night), and less than a bottle of hard liquor. These are not the students that we see with entire walls of bottles.

How much do philosophers drink?

Oct

22

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Spooking it up

Hip Hop and Politics powers us through our last week of ~the spook~. Bucket List represents the intellectual privilege we enjoy as Columbia students. We do our very best to bring to your attention important guest lecturers and special events on campus. Our recommendations for this week are below, and the full list is after the jump. If you notice any events that have been left off the list, or if you have a correction, please let us know in the comments.

Recommended Events

  • Discussion: “Migration Challenges to Human Rights in Europe” with Dr. Nils Muiznieks, Commissioner for Human Rights at the Council of Europe. Tuesday, October 24, 7:00 – 8:30 pm. IAB, Room 1219.
  • “Fight the Power: A Global Conversation Exploring Hip-Hop and Social Consciousness”. Wednesday, October 25, 6:30 – 8:00 pm. Lenfest Center for the Arts, The Lantern.
  • “Power Talk with Athena Distinguished Fellow Jehmu Greene” Wednesday, October 25, 7:00 – 8:30 pm. Barnard Hall, Held Lecture Hall.
  • “A History of Echoes: Memory and Militant Sound Investigations” Thursday, October 26, 6:00 – 7:30 pm. Knox Hall, Room 509.
  • “The Second New York International Chinese Calligraphy Exhibition and Reception” Friday, October 27, 4:00 – 6:00 pm. Kent Hall, East Asian Library.

Click for the daily spook

Oct

22

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Are you really trying to miss out on recreating this photo with us

Earthlings! Because Lerner does not yet have a pool for us to gather in (ahem! @CCSC), we thought it would be fun to open up our own watering hole of Trader Joe’s Cookie Dunkers and Brie cheese to you all tonight. Come by Lerner 510 at 9pm for free fun! Bring your swimsuits, and remember: no shoes, no shirt, no service problem. Do not worry if you can’t swim (pitch ideas). Lessons and life jackets will be provided. ♥

Suck my intelligence and creativity via Infrogmation

Oct

22

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Happening Around the World: One BBC writer took a trip to Indonesia to find out more about its nudist community. (BBC)

Happening in the Nation: Former President Obama, Clinton, Carter, as well as both President Bushes, gathered together at a relief concert in Texas to raise money for hurricane victims.  (USA Today)

Happening in NYC: City college will name Vincent G. Boudreau as its new President next week. This comes a year after its former president stepped down in the midst of an investigation into her finances.  (NYT)

Happening on Campus: There is a Bwog meeting happening this evening at 9pm in Lerner! We will post a meeting announcement shortly :-)

Overseen:
A single and sad-looking JJ’s cup on Amsterdam. Contents: unknown.

Oct

21

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Bwogger Sarah Harty reviews Columbia Musical Theater Society’s production of “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee”, directed by Nina Lam BC ’19, produced by Emeline Bookspan BC ’18, stage managed by Clare Bradley CC ’20, and choreographed by Harmony Maria Graziano CC ’19, with Anna Bryan CC ’18 as the Music Director. 

Is this what stress culture looks like?

Like most William Finn shows (he wrote the music and lyrics, with Rachel Sheinkin authoring the book), “Spelling Bee” is a bit ridiculous. Every character is overdramatic, stereotyped, and not very lifelike – they’re closer to something you’d find on a Saturday morning cartoon than sitting next to you in class. Every “Spelling Bee” cast and crew’s job is to bring spirit and humanity to these cardboard cutouts. Nina Lam’s production does this beautifully, filling the tiny Glicker-Milstein Theatre black box with laughter, tears, heart, and a harsh dose of reality.

The plot is simple enough, save for one flashback at the beginning, the entire show is set during the bee itself. The sympathetic but stern Rona Lisa Peretti (Anna Stacy, SPS ’17), the bee’s winner in its third year, serves as judge, along with Vice Principal Douglas Panch (William Cagle, CC ’20).
So who are the contestants?

Oct

21

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Chef Mike before taking this photo: “Let me put my hat on first, I’m naked without it.”

If you haven’t noticed from the multiple advertising campaigns on Bwog’s homepage, Columbia’s Sexual Respect Initiative is required for all new Columbia students to complete by October 29. While the program offers a range of ways to fulfill the requirement, Bwogger Ramisa Murshed took a peek at one particular event that involved, you guessed it, teaching students how to set up the perfect dinner date.

When I walked into John Jay Dining Hall for Columbia Dining and Sexual Violence Response’s joint program called “Ingredients for Healthy Relationships,” I wasn’t really sure what I was expecting. The idea behind the event seemed kind of bizarre to me, but in the end, I’m glad I got to experience it.

The facilitators and participants of the program, including myself, congregated in the area around Chef Mike’s Kitchen, and the participants signed in, grabbed some recipes and SVR pamphlets, and sat down at two thoughtfully decorated tables. The tables were covered with brown tablecloths and had orange (a shade that was a mix of pumpkin and blood orange) napkins, utensils placed the proper way, and glasses filled with ice (with a lemon on top!) for each person. Each table was also topped with two blue glass bottles of Saratoga Spring Water.

More tips and food after the jump

Oct

21

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Beautiful, shiny, and new!

Stonehenge. The Bermuda Triangle. The Berenstain Bears. While some of those greatest mysteries in the world have still been unsolved by humankind, the new and improved Columbia Student Mail Center, which moved into the space of Wien Hall this year, is not one of them. Bwog talked with Mike Pagan, Executive Director of Administrative Services (Columbia Mail, Print, and Transportation), to get some answers to our questions, and here’s what we found out:

  1. If you need to pick up an urgent item such as important documents or prescription medication after the Mail Center closes, you’re in luck: Student Mail “just launched after-hour lockers for access to packages and mail when the Student Mail Center is closed.” All you need to do is reply to your email notification when your package has arrived, before 3 p.m. on the day you want to pick it up.
  2. This year’s rush period was “very successful” for Student Mail, according to Pagan. Student move-in days are actually not the busiest time for the Student Mail Center, which in fact classifies the period of late August to September as a rush period. Pagan said that during this year’s rush period, “almost 39,000 packages were distributed, with pickup wait times below 2 minutes.” In comparison to last year, this was a 13% increase in package distribution!
  3. You weren’t hallucinating when you thought that the check-in kiosks changed locations. During rush season every year, students access the Mail Center via Morningside Heights drive, which “helps minimize traffic congestion in and out of the Wien Lobby” and facilitates transport of larger-sized packages such as mini-fridges and TVs. After rush period ends, students enter the mail Center through Wien for the rest of the year.
  4. The move to Wien was important for a number of reasons, the most important being the sheer increase over the years in the volume of packages shipped. The Wien Mail Center is 2,765 square feet, more than double the 1,200 square feet space of the old Lerner Hall package center, and thus accommodates this upward trend.
  5. Some other great changes have occurred as a result of the move: Students can now use some of the valuable space that Student Mail freed up. In addition, Wien allows both mail and package servie teams “work together in one location, improving productivity.” Pagan also cites the new location is as “better positioned to the delivery access point on Morningside Drive.”
  6. What might you see in the future of the Mail Center? This is one question we can’t quite answer. However, as he believes that the uptick in mailing volume will continue, Pagan said, “[The Mail Center team] will continue to evaluate needs and look for tech or operational enhancements to our service.”

Picture via Columbia Mail Services

Oct

21

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So this is an astronaut, still technically on Earth, walking along a ramp in the sky?

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

On Campus:

  • Continuing their Cinema of Resistance series, the Maison Française is hosting a screening of The Assembly (L’Assemblée) from 6:30-9:00 pm on Tuesday night. The film, directed by Mariana Otero, is about the Nuit Debout (Arise at Night) protests of March 2016 in Paris. These protests marked the first time that a grassroots political organization was able to create a “democratic assembly” protest. The film screening will be followed by a group discussion.
  • Thursday night, stop by Miller Theatre to see Mahan Esfahani perform Goldberg Variations, the 1741 Bach aria. Esfahani will be playing harpsichord to present this beautiful classical piece. Tickets range from $35-$55, which you can buy here.
  • This Friday night in the Sulz Parlor, come listen to the Barnard-Columbia Chamber Singers perform with the Elqui Trio. The Elqui Trio is a group of musicians with South American roots whose repertoire encompasses everything from classical musical to South American folk music. Together, the singers will perform an exciting array of South American songs. The show starts at 8 pm!
  • Next weekend (Oct 27 and 28) is the Columbia University Players Annual One Act Festival. This year, the three one-act plays featured are Boy Meets Girl (a love story about two five-year-olds), Heart’s Desire (two parents wait for their daughter to return home), and Removing the Glove (a coming of age story about being left handed). You can check out the Facebook event here!

Off Campus:

  • Opening on Sunday at the MoMA PS1 is a new exhibit by Carolee Schneemann called Kinetic Painting. Schneemann’s work throughout the late 20th century has explored “subjectivity, the social construction of the female body, and the cultural biases of art history.” The exhibit features many of Schneemann’s avant-garde paintings from the 1950’s to the 2000’s. The exhibit will be featured at the MoMA PS1 through early March.
  • Opening today at Postmasters in Chinatown is Serkan Özkaya’s We Will Wait, a reinterpretation of Marcel Duchamp’s Étant donnés. Posmasters calls Marcel Duchamp’s Étant donnés “an elaborately detailed and beautifully disturbing room—encompassing tableau, which could be peered upon through two peepholes in a wooden door, enclosing the illuminated scene within.” Özkaya has created a replica of Étant donnés, which you can find at Postmasters until November 25.
  • Yesterday at the Whitney, Toyin Ojih Odutola opened her first solo exhibition. This exhibit, titled To Wander Determined, is comprised of large scale portrait paintings of fictional characters imagined by Odutola herself. According to the exhibit description, “Highly attentive to detail and the nuances of space, class, and color—whether of palette or skin—Ojih Odutola continues her examinations of narrative, authenticity, and representation.”

Wild astronaut man image from CUP Facebook Page

Oct

21

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The original sad boy? Just look at that stony stare.

Happening in the World:  Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy has stated that his administration will unveil measures today to counter the Catalonian independence movement, after blasting it as “an unacceptable attempt at secession.” His statements come after a controversial October 1 referendum vote, in which of 43% of Catalonian individuals who took part, 90% voted for independence from Spain. (Washington Post)

Happening in the US: Video evidence has emerged to prove false the Thursday statements of White House Chief of Staff John Kelly, who accused Representative Frederica S. Wilson of bragging during a military ceremony about attaining $20 million for a South Florida F.B.I. building. Released by Florida newspaper The Sun Sentinel, the video demonstrates that Ms. Wilson never claimed credit for securing the money for the building, but only ever discussed her part in passing legislation to name the building after two fallen federal agents. (Sun Sentinel)

Happening in NYC: The mosaic coffee table of an Upper East Side family was found on Friday to be an ancient artifact from the Roman emperor Caligula. In the 1960s, the family had bought the mosaic from an aristocratic Italian family as an antique that was found on the shores of Lake Remi. Italian officials believe that the mosaic, composed of porphry cobbles arranged in colorful geometric patterns, likely comprised part of flooring of Caligula’s two “pleasure ships” during his reign, 37-41 A.D. Stay classy. (NBC)

Happening on campus: An open-to-public mural painting event, led by local NYC Latinx graffiti artists, will take place on Low Plaza today at 11 am. Hosted by a coalition of school and student groups, this event is an “interactive workshop” for all to join, with purpose of engaging the public in “a unifying activity of art that unites us all.”

Overseen: A Plimpton security guard practicing ballroom dance positions in the lobby as someone plays piano in the lounge. We’re all here for this wholesome content.

A Yahoo Answers question for your intellectual stimulation:

Peter Pan, is that you?

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