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Monthly Archive: November 2017

Nov

30

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Riley Casey makes a move against Boston College.

The men’s and women’s basketball teams both played tight games this past Wednesday. Staff writer Abby Rubel explains the results of each matchup.

Men’s basketball loses by five points in overtime:

Men’s basketball (1-5) fell to University of Connecticut (5-2) 77-73 in a heartbreaking overtime loss. The Lions led with 2:36 left on the clock, thanks in part to a 25 point effort from junior Lukas Meisner and an 11 point lead going into halftime. The Huskies then came back in the second half, taking the lead for the first time since the opening seconds with 1:40 left in the game. Two free throws from sophomore Patrick Tapé gave the Lions the lead again, and a three-pointer from sophomore Quinton Adlesh seemed to put it away. But UConn guard Jalen Adams hit a jumper with 19 seconds left to tie the game up, and first-year Mike Smith missed a three-pointer in the final seconds, sending the game to overtime.

The Huskies took the lead quickly with a three-pointer, which was answered a minute later with a layup and a free throw from Smith to tie the score again. Smith scored another three a few seconds later to answer one from Adams. But a foul by Meisner gave UConn two free throws and the lead and, despite a layup from senior Nate Hickman, Columbia couldn’t come back. A jump shot and two free throws from UConn put away the game.

Women’s basketball ends three-game losing streak by eight points:

Women’s basketball (3-5) eked out a tight victory 68-60 over Boston College (3-4). After a contentious first half, the Lions outshot the Eagles in the third quarter 20-12. Boston attempted a comeback in the fourth, but Columbia maintained its lead thanks in part to first-year Riley Casey. Casey scored only 12 points the entire game, but 10 of those points came clutch in the fourth quarter as the Lions struggled to shut down the Eagles. Her 12 point effort was the second highest personal point total of the day for the Lions, behind only Camille Zimmerman’s 14 points.

Photo via gocolumbialions.com

Nov

30

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Despite it being quite late in the semester, it’s also roommate switching season. While most of us at least tolerate those who live with us, some aren’t so lucky. If this is you, you probably know it. However, if you’re on the fence about changing rooms, here are some criteria you may want to consider:

If you and your roommate are no longer this tight, it might be because of these reasons.

You should think about switching roommates if…

  • They constantly sexile you.
  • They constantly sexile you and then they don’t even have sex. They just, like, cuddle or something.
  • They never wash their sheets or towels. Like, ever.
  • They don’t wake you up when you’re sleeping through a class.
  • Their cleaning habits or lack thereof are basically an open invitation for vermin.
  • They unironically have the “Keep Calm and Carry On” poster.
  • They don’t understand the concept of headphones.
  • You loan them something and later find it on Buy/Sell/Trade.
  • They screenshot all your snapchats.
  • They use the phrase “Saturdays are for the boys”.

Nov

30

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Columbia is one of the most sleep deprived schools, so no wonder people are falling asleep everywhere. When, on her way back to campus after Thanksgiving, staff writer Aliya Schneider heard someone snoring behind her on the train, she was inspired to compile this ranking of the worst places on campus (ordered from best to absolute worst). What’s the worse place you’ve slept on campus?

Find a place to sleep that isn’t on this list, unlike this poor Butler soul.

10. The Lawn
Con: Everyone can see you. Everyone can take snapchats of you. If you’re in a hammock, people call you extra. If you’re cuddling with someone, people tell you to get a room. Maybe a bird poops on you. Your professor sees you. Your Columbia Crush sees your drool. You wouldn’t know what happened, because you were asleep.
Pro: You finally left Butler and got some fresh air.

9. The Floor In Front Of Cafe East
Con: It’s random as hell, which makes you super noticeable.
Pro: Not many other people sleep here, and if you’re in the corner, you’re out of the way. No one will step on you unless you’re blocking an outlet or trash can.

8. Butler
Con: You’re bothering everyone with your snoring, you’re taking up space that people who actually want to study could use, you’re contributing to the stress culture and weird atmosphere in Butler, you need to leave and go to bed, or go get some fresh air and sleep on the lawn.
Pro: You’re showing your commitment to this fine institution and the art of learning by making our beautiful library your home. Butler is open all night so you could save on city housing costs by never leaving.

The worst seven places ahead…

Nov

30

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A fire engine in front of Ruggles Hal, with its ladder extended towards a third-story window while students look on.

Students last night were forced to evacuate the burning residence hall.

Ruggles Hall decided to do its best impression of our hearts and minds this finals week by setting itself ablaze. At about 11:30 pm last night, Bwog started receiving tips about a growing fire on 114th Street. When windows started to shatter, we could tell that this was not your average false fire alarm. You can follow along with the full coverage of the fire through last night’s tweets.

One of the most afflicted rooms was visibly black with soot and ravaged by the flame. It took about a dozen firefighters for the situation to get the situation under control, and most Ruggles residents were put out of their homes for hours.

As though conspiring to prevent the Fire Department of New York from getting any sleep, another alarm went off in Wien Hall around 1:45 am. Our sources who live in that dorm reported that floors 7, 8, and 9 were “smokey”, but that the situation was resolved relatively quickly; students were able to re-enter after only a half-hour of sleep deprivation.

As one new arrival in Morningside Heights remarked, “I’ve never been to a school that’s so bad at not being on fire.” This semester has been more plagued by an incessant spree of fire alarms, which have spurred a variety of responses from students. But fires have constantly plagued Columbia and Barnard, from the famous 2015 fire which spelled the end of Ollie’s (which was supposedly accidental) to a 2016 Schapiro incident which Public Safety later classified as an arson. Butler Library got a scare in 2014, and Elliot Hall joined the fun in 2016. Has Columbia ever considered not being on fire?

UPDATE, 11/30/17, 6 pm: Earlier this afternoon, Columbia students received an email from Joyce Jackson, Tara Hanna, and Bryan Violetto (Columbia’s Housing Director, Res Life Director, and Fire Safety Facilities and Operations Manager, respectively) with more information on the Ruggles fire. They wrote that the fire started on the third floor of the dorm, due to clothing that was placed on top of a halogen lamp connected to electricity via an extension cord; halogen lamps and extension cords are both prohibited items in Columbia residence halls. This fire, the directors hope, will be a useful incentive for all students to review general fire and kitchen safety procedures. Housing and Res Life also confirmed that the building was evacuated without any reported injuries.

Photo via Bwog Staff

Nov

30

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A very insta-worthy event.

It seems like there should be a bit of a lull in the workload between midterms and finals, but there really isn’t. Take a break from wasting away in the library and visit the tree lighting ceremony on College Walk tonight!

According to the Facebook event:

We will serve hot chocolate, cider, and donuts and have amazing Columbia long-sleeves starting at 5:30pm. At 6, there will be performances from a cappella groups, special words from your student councils and school deans, and of course, the countdown for the tree lighting itself!

Past lighting via Yourccsc, via C.Munoz

 

Nov

30

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Happening Around The World: Remember when North Korea was launching a bunch of missiles and they weren’t really going anywhere? Well, they did it again and now they’re going somewhere. The country’s government claims that their latest ballistic missile launch reached ten times the height of the International Space Station, and now the US is asking other nations to cut all ties with the DPRK. (BBC)

To reiterate: Really fucking high.

Happening In The US: Longtime “Today Show” anchor Matt Lauer has been fired from NBC after multiple allegations of sexual misconduct from coworkers. As SNL put it, it does indeed seem like every man we once trusted is a sex monster. (NBC News)

Happening In NYC: A review of the mayoral election found that New York Yankees right fielder Aaron Judge received ten write-in votes for the city’s highest office. Just when you think New York couldn’t out-New York itself any more… (NY Post)

Happening At Columbia: The Alexander Hamilton Society presents “Iran: Deal or No Deal” tonight in room 101 of the Law School from 8:00 – 9:30 pm. The event will be a debate between Danielle Pletka and David Phillips, and will center on whether the Iran Deal is a “landmark compromise or a dismal failure”.

Overheard: “Pret a Manger”, pronounced like “Away in a Manger”. Christmas is coming, folks!

Nov

29

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Can you see the stars?

A few weeks ago, we developed @notbwog, a Twitter bot that imitates Bwog headlines through a randomized generator based on our actual Twitter. This past weekend, the bot tweeted a headline so hauntingly excellent, we knew we had to develop it into an actual post. Managing Editor Betsy Ladyzhets ran this headline through several more random generators, ten rounds of Google Translate, and a couple of dril-inspired conversation programs. The results… may surprise you.

It is a cold and terror-filled night. You sit in your dorm room, scrolling through Facebook and nursing a beer stolen from your roommate’s mini-fridge. It tastes of fizz and piss and something heavier, something that sits beneath your tongue like the air just before a storm.

The wifi goes out. You stare at your laptop for a moment – but Facebook is stuck, frozen on the same pane. Your little cousin frowning at an ice cream cone she has dropped into her lap. Her bright green dress stained with chocolate. You refresh, and the page goes white, then tells you something has gone wrong. You reach forward, hoping blindly to knock some sense into the machine, and send your beer flying. Yellow-brown spills over the sides of your desk and onto your roommate’s soft, white rug, as though the asshole who lives three doors down broke in and pissed, just for fun. That’s the story you’ll tell your roommate tomorrow.

Something has gone wrong.

Nov

29

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Amaris Hemmings, CC ’19, killing the field

With Thanksgiving over and the holiday season upon us, it seems appropriate to take time to be thankful for the strong fall sports season that Columbia Athletics had this year. With the shocking 8-2 Columbia Football winning season, the Columbia community exposed themselves as true bandwagon fans, but the success of other programs was also something new and exciting to follow for many new Lions fans. This past season was one to remember, and while football may have stolen the spotlight, other teams—specifically Columbia Women’s Soccer—also have earned the bragging rights of a successful season.

The Lions (9-5-2 overall, 5-1-1 conference) had a lot to celebrate this season. With 6 back-to-back shutout wins that would lead them to making program history with a 5-0 standing before their Yale game, Columbia Women’s Soccer experienced one of their best seasons in recent memory. With the exception of Seton Hall early into the season, every game that Columbia won was a shutout, proving that the Lions dominated the field. Despite experiencing losses on the road early into the season, everything seemed to change at Cornell: with a 2-0 win, the Lions would begin to show considerable momentum once they began to play in-conference games. Columbia would later win against Brown and Penn in hard fought overtimes and beat Wagner at a staggering 11-0. The Lions would end their season with a loss to Yale and finish with a tied game versus Harvard.

While the end of their season does not reflect their impressive results amongst the Ivies, several players stood out on the field. Senior defender Natalie Ambrose was recognized as the Ivy League Defensive Player of the Year, goalkeeper Sophie Whitehouse was also recognized for Ivy League Player of the Week and midfielder Natalie Neshat was Top Drawer Soccer’s National Women’s Team of the Week after Columbia’s 2-0 win against Princeton.

Columbia Women’s Soccer held their own this season. After a strong season for both the men and women’s soccer teams, Columbia Soccer will definitely be something worth watching next year, especially if Columbia Football decides to take another 20 year hiatus. Columbia Athletics has had an impressively strong start to a new academic year: maybe it’s time to really start learning Roar, Lion, Roar.

Photo via Columbia University Athletics/Mike McLaughlin

Nov

29

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The man behind the screen

If you’ve ever had the absolute pleasure of reading Spectator op-eds, first of all, you and your loved ones may be entitled to financial compensation. Second of all, you may recognize the profile of Man With Axe, a frequent commenter with conservative viewpoints. When I went to his Disqus profile, I realized that he comments on many other college newspapers and blogs. So, I reached out to Man With Axe over email to talk about internet comment culture, the protection of anonymity, and the politics of college students. Some questions were omitted for conciseness. 

Bwog: Tell me about yourself. Are you currently a college student? Where are you studying / did you study? What are you studying / did you study?

Man With Axe: I was a college professor for 31 years, now retired. I have degrees in history, law, and business administration. My undergrad was from an Ivy school and my graduate degrees were from another highly ranked private university.

Bwog: You comment on just about every major campus publication. What are your favorites and least favorites?

MWA: My favorites are the Ivies, Stanford, Duke, and some of the major state universities, such as Michigan, Berkeley, Maryland, Texas, UNC, and Virginia. The only negative thing I would say about some schools is that they rarely print anything. For example, Ohio State doesn’t do much.

Bwog: Your comments usually come from a conservative social and political perspective. Why do you think fewer op-eds from college websites come from a conservative perspective? Is this an issue?

MWA: The fact that so few op-eds are written from a conservative perspective is why I comment as much as I do. I spent my life with college students, and I’m very interested in what they are thinking. I’m troubled to discover that they are receiving a partial education from their virtually all-progressive faculty. They seem to come to college already hell-bent on being progressive activists, and they don’t seem to realize that half the country disagrees with them. Or, perhaps they do realize it, but they believe that the half that thinks differently are all evil and/or stupid. And they thought this before the rise of Trump. This belief that the other side is evil leads them to adopt anti-free speech positions, to believe that violence is justified to silence their enemies. And then they go out and demonstrate these beliefs. “Your speech is violence, and my violence is speech.”

More ManWithAxe !

Nov

29

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ceremony of sparkly lights thanks to our student councils

Happy Wednesday! Bwog’s GSSC (General Studies Student Council) Bureau Chief, Alex Tang, is back with updates on last night’s council meeting.

This week’s GSSC meeting was one of a nitty-gritty, technical nature, focusing mostly on structural and financial matters regarding the council.

To start, GS President Sam Demezieux introduced the plan for the four Columbia undergraduate student councils (GSSC, CCSC, ESC, and Barnard SGA) to form a four-school fund. Since there are certain events that all four schools share (including Tree Lighting and Glass House Rocks), creating a common fund would make logistics much easier. Allocations for funds would be set up in the beginning of the term, saving discussion time during student council meetings. At the earliest, the four-school fund would be implemented by the coming spring semester.

VP of Policy, Raisa Flor, introduced and passed two bylaw amendments to the current GSSC constitution. Firstly, the removal of any associate of the GSSC must now require a majority vote by the executive board (rather than at the sole discretion of the committee chief). The GSSC policy committee will also add a health/wellness position, due to the immediate importance of the issue at Columbia.

Click here for GSSC’s plan to revamp its elections process, as well as other updates

Nov

29

img November 29, 20179:45 amimg 0 Comments

You turn around to flush the toilet… you see him… what do you do?

Happening In The World: The Australian state of Victoria becomes the first in the nation to legalise assisted dying. After over 100 hours of debate, the legislation has been approved, allowing terminally ill patients the “right to request a lethal drug from mid-2019”. Patients must be at least 18 years old with less than six months to live. (BBC)

Happening In The Nation: A beautiful iguana visited a woman on the toilet. A Tampa-bay resident noticed a spiny tailed iguana floating around in her toilet bowl. Her neighbour quickly extracted the foot-long iguana from the toilet using a net and cooler. The iguana has since been named Flushy by Matthews Wildlife Rescue. (BayNews9)

Happening In NYC: Sayfullo Saipov pleads not guilty to 22 federal counts. Saipov is being charged for killing eight people and injuring a dozen more on October 31st, when he drove his pickup truck “down a bicycle path near the World Trade Center”. The incident has been labelled as New York’s deadliest terror attack since 9/11. Saipov will next appear in court on January 23rd. (CNN)

Happening On Campus: Columbia Law School is hosting a panel discussion about New York’s abortion laws tonight at 6:30 to 8:30pm in Jerome Green Hall, Room 103. The discussion will be about “New York State’s current abortion laws and how they contradict Roe v. Wade and how anti-choice extremist try to prevent women from accessing abortion care”. Make sure to RSVP for the event, Outdated and Dangerous: New York’s Abortion Laws Are Failing Us!

Overheard: “You should go to the stacks with him.” “I should go eat his ass?”

Sensual iguana via JimRules42

Nov

28

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Pret getting ready for business

The Pret A Manger storefront next to Shake Shack has become increasingly developed over the past couple of weeks, since we discovered that this chain would be opening a store just off campus. And it appears that those renovations will be complete very soon: Pret will be opening this Friday, December 1, a representative told us earlier today.

The eatery has also planned a soft opening for this Thursday, November 30, with giveaways taking place from 8 to 10 am and from 11 am to 1 pm. What will they be giving away? How many of those mystery items will be available? Why the break from 10 to 11 am? We don’t know, but we’re excited to find out.

Photo via Bwog Staff

Nov

28

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Gender-neutral Barnard

Following the Thanksgiving break, Barnard Bwogger Dassi Karp is back with updates from the latest SGA meeting. This weeks focal point resolved around providing various support mechanisms for trans and gender-questioning individuals on campus.

At this week’s Rep Council meeting, Barnard’s Student Government Association continued with its goal of reaching out to student groups and administrators on campus to increase communication, dialogue, and see how they can all work together to support students. For the first time this semester, neither of the visiting groups were strictly Barnard-affiliated (I know, you just spent all of Thanksgiving break explaining that Barnard is one of the four undergraduate colleges of Columbia University, look we even play on the same sports teams and take classes together. But you also explained that the relationship is ungodly complicated, I’m sure). While clubs at Columbia are certainly open to Barnard students, SGA has tended to invite groups incorporated under the Governing Board at Barnard (GBB), and not the Student Governing Board (SGB) at Columbia. Nevertheless, the groups who sent representatives to last night’s meeting are relevant to Barnard students, and they had interesting information to share.

So what did these groups say?

Nov

28

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Athena would be proud

While all of us were gearing up for Thanksgiving break last Tuesday, Barnard announced the fall Phi Beta Kappa inductees from the class of 2018. The list this year is particularly short; only thirteen students. Congratulations to these seniors!

  • Megan Cerbin (Spanish and Latin American Cultures)
  • Milena d’Ornano (Political Science)
  • Allison Hand (Psychology & Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality)
  • Lauren Hayashi (Environmental Science)
  • Doha Tazi Hemida (Asian and Middle-Eastern Cultures & Religion)
  • Aliza Holstein (Psychology)
  • Rebecca Jedwab (Economics)
  • Ana Shindell (Anthropology)
  • Danielle Silber (Psychology)
  • Kyra Spence (English-Writing)
  • Teresa Tracy (Political Science & Spanish and Latin American Cultures)
  • Erin Low Li Wen (Philosophy)
  • Lingke Xiao (Economics)

Barnard’s favorite statue via Barnard’s website

Nov

28

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A National Historic Landmark

Have you ever gotten so bored that you just read Columbia University’s Wikipedia page in its entirety? No? Well, here are some of the funnest fun facts about Columbia from Wikipedia. (Disclaimer: everything in this article comes straight from Wikipedia, and we don’t guarantee that everything is entirely accurate. This is Wikipedia’s words, not ours!)

  • Columbia was the first school in the US to grant the M.D. degree.
  • The Pulitzer Prize is administered annually by Columbia.
  • Columbia has the second most Nobel Prize-winning affiliates in the country (the first being Harvard).
  • Columbia College didn’t admit women until 1983.
  • Columbia University is the second largest landowner in New York City, after the Catholic Church.
  • As of 2012, Columbia’s library system was the 8th largest library system and the 5th largest collegiate library system in the US by the number of volumes possessed.
  • Low is a National Historic Landmark because of its architectural significance.
  • Pupin is also a National Historic Landmark because the first experiments on the fission of uranium were conducted there. (Never mind that random sulfuric smells waft into my CC class in Pupin 425 once in a while.)
  • The FM radio was invented in Philosophy Hall by Edwin Armstrong, class of 1913.
  • Columbia has a campus in Palisades, NY (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory) and one in Irvington, NY (Nevis Laboratories).
  • CC and SEAS didn’t accept the Common Application until 2010, making Columbia the last Ivy to switch to the Common App.
  • Columbia was the first North American site where the uranium atom was split.
  • The laser was invented at Columbia. (Its invention is widely but not universally attributed to Gordon Gould, who was then a graduate student at Columbia.)
  • Many other inventions were and are being born at Columbia, and the university made $230 million from patent-related deals in the 2006 fiscal year: more than any other university in the world.
  • ADP, which was established at Columbia in 1836, was the first Greek life organization on campus.
  • The Columbia Review is the nation’s oldest college literary magazine.
  • In 1870, Columbia’s football team played the second football game ever in the history of football against Rutgers.
  • They (the football team) also hold the record for the longest losing streak for the NCAA Football Championship Subdivision: 44 losses in a row between 1983 and 1988.
  • Apparently, our archrival is Princeton.
  • The Columbia University Orchestra, founded in 1896, is the oldest continually operating university orchestra in the US.
  • The Columbia Queer Alliance, founded in 1967, is the oldest gay student organization in the world.

Low via Bwog Archives

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