#hypocrisy
Bwoglines: Sex Sex Sexy Sex Edition

Sex just keeps improving and spreading!

Having Babies Is Becoming Safer: Scientists cured a baby of AIDS for the first time yesterday, creating hope for a universal cure. (Wall Street Journal)

(New York) University is Becoming Sexier Ever wonder what NYUers looked like in the 1920s? No? Neither did we, but here are some photos anyways. (Gothamist)

Being Gay Is Becoming More Likely to Be Accepted (in the UK): Cardinal Keith O’Brien, preeminent Catholic and main opposer to gay marriage in the UK, resigned a week ago amid allegations of sexual misconduct. Yesterday he admitted to having sex with other priests. (Telegraph)

The Church Is Becoming Less Nosy (Hopefully): This op-ed featuring Columbia Professor Colm Toibin tackles the life of Mary, and ends with Toibin’s commentary on the new Pope and challenges to the Catholic church. (The New York Times)

But Let’s Be Careful: Three Cornell frats were suspended for hazing. (IvyGate)

Title via:

Overheard: Economics is Serious Business
ECONOMIEZ!

Blissfully ignorant of what real economists do, a student is deeply concerned with the state of economic awareness:

“It’s just like, lame people everywhere are gonna be having conversations about the ECONOMY without ever taking an Econ class! I mean, I only took principles, but…”

Fancy lines via Wikimedia Commons

Fear and Loathing in East Campus


Two Bwoggers report on a disturbing journey to the center of the mind…

Our reasons for doing Salvia had as much to do with irony as they did with recreation. Free of associations with the 1960s counterculture, the perfectly legal psychoactive escaped the social retrenchment our nation experienced during the 70s and 80s. So while Salvia gets you high on one of the most powerful hallucinogens known to man, it also gets you high on contradiction: going by our current standards (you know, the ones that don’t let you drink ‘til you’re 21), there is no conceivable justification for keeping this stuff legal. None. It’s like hypocrisy you can smoke.

I, however, was a bit confused when my co-experimentalist first floated the idea. A visit to Wikipedia turned up the following information (here I paraphrase):

Salvia divinorum is a naturally occurring herb related to mint and capable of producing strong psychoactive effects for a short amount of time when smoked and inhaled. Its twenty-minute trip has characteristics of both weed and stronger drugs, like shrooms. Salvia’s Latin name means “sage of the seers”; the word salvia is related to salve, used by the ancient Romans to mean “hello,” “be well,” and possibly ““care for a smoke?.”

After digesting this new knowledge, I thought for a few seconds, reveled in the narcissism of enlightened drug use, and replied: “Sure, why the hell not?” After all, I was in need of a psychoactively novel experience, and I didn’t see myself making it down to the Navajo Nation any time in the near future. So a few weeks later he and I, after pushing through throngs of hipsters and goths on St. Mark’s Place and purchasing our wares in a seedy yet comforting headshop (Addiction NYC, for the curious), found ourselves loading surprisingly odorless, fine brown leaves into a knobby and voluminous bubbler.

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