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Oct

14

Who will take the Iron Throne…we mean the chambers of Congress?

Bucket List represents the intellectual privilege we enjoy as Columbia students. We do our very best to bring to your attention important guest lecturers and special events on campus. Our recommendations for this week are below, and the full list is after the jump. If you notice any events that have been left off the list, or if you have a correction, please let us know in the comments.

Recommended

Petition for Columbia to cancel midterms so we can go to all the events after the jump.

Oct

14

Written by

we need to make robes happen

Elle Ferguson, a freshman at Barnard and staff writer for Bwog, observes the important stuff.

When you read the title of this article you may have thought to yourself: how did someone think of sorting the quad buildings? My answer to that is: how could someone not sort the quad buildings? There are four buildings, and four Hogwarts houses guys, c’mon. Quite frankly, I’m surprised no one thought of this before. How can I be the first person at Bwog to mention this? I’ve been to the meetings, I’m not the craziest person there. Nonetheless, I take honor in being the first trailblazer in this terrain. I’m sorting these buildings according to my own experiences, so some of you may disagree. If so, write your own article.

  • Sulzberger: Gryffindor
    • Like it’s impossible to not like at least one Gryffindor in the Harry Potter series, everyone has a Sulz babe that they know and love. Whether you met for AC benefits during NSOP and developed a relationship from there, or met before you knew where they lived and discovered their housing situation to be the “cherry on top”, we all have a Sulz love in our lives. And, they’ve got a wild and well-rounded vibe, like all classic Gryffindors.
  • Brooks: Hufflepuff
    • I know one or two people in Brooks who happen to be the sweetest people on the planet. Maybe your Brooks acquaintance isn’t your best friend, but you can’t deny their inner goodness. Having a Brooks person in your life is like having a Hershey’s chocolate bar. You can’t get enough.
  • Reid: Ravenclaw
    • I live in Reid and I once asked someone in my hall if they wanted to study with me. They replied “I’m ok, I think I like, already know everything,” with a casual shrug and then walked away. If that’s not Ravenclaw I don’t know what is.
  • Hewitt: Slytherin
    • I don’t like Hewitt.

Oct

14

Written by

home sweet home

We’re back with Science Fair, Bwog’s weekly curated list of interesting STEM-related talks, symposiums, and events happening on campus. For science and non-science majors alike, our list will bring you events that will satisfy your scientific curiosity for everything from astronomy to zoology, and everything in between.

For anyone, related-majors and non-majors alike:

  • Embodied Cognition and Prosthetics: Are Our Tools Part of Our Bodies?
    Monday, October 15, 4-6pm, Heyman Center for the Humanities (74 Morningside Dr), register at this link
    Event description: “Embodied cognition theorists emphasize the role of the body and the environment in constituting mental processes. By examining how our brains interact with the rest of our bodies and how our entire bodies interact with the environment, we can learn much about human behavior and the human mind.”
  • Seminars on Sex, Gender, and Autism Spectrum Disorder
    Monday, October 15, 6:15-8:30pm, Fayerweather 513, register at the link
    Event description: Using relevant readings from research, this seminar will examine the interplay of sex and gender in how male-female phenotypes of ASD are characterized. Speakers include Rebecca Jordan-Young (Barnard), Chiara Manzini (George Washington University), and Russell D Romeo (Barnard)
  • “Face/Off or On? Face Transplants and the Resistance to Categorization” presented by Sharrona Pearl (UPenn)
    Wednesday, October 17, 6-8pm, Fayerweather 513, more info at the link
    Event description: Both like and not like cosmetic surgery and whole organ transplants, facial allografts have proven difficult to categorize. This talk will show how bioethicists, surgeons, and journalists have conceptualized face transplants as neither and both, and the resulting stakes for each.

Click here for Columbia Astronomy Public Outreach and more!

Oct

14

Ugh, these beauties.

Shoutout to the Morningside CSA for giving me enough radishes to last a lifetime last week and for making me expand my palate! Here’s a recipe to use up the entire vegetable, including the greens. I know radish pasta sounds like something your grandma would force you to eat at a family function but I promise it is delicious.

Garlicky Radish Pasta

Ingredients

Juice and zest of one lemon
Butter (optional!)
3 cloves of garlic
8 radishes and their greens, sliced into little rounds
Parmesan cheese (optional!)
Pasta! Works best with chunky shapes like gigli, orecchiette, or farfalle rather than spaghetti, but go crazy.
Olive oil to taste.

I know you’ve never been more excited to hear about radishes.

Oct

14

Written by

spitting straight fire since 1564

In honor of crisp fall weather finally descending upon us and some lingering thoughts of summer, have this love sonnet Shakespeare himself wrote to Bwog. And come to our open meeting tonight at 9pm in Lerner 510!

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Many hands do take the darling grapes away,
And summer’s fruit hath very sweet a taste:
Sometime too steep the ramp of Lerner inclines,
And often is his perilous climb chagrined;
But always there is Bwog oh beloved Mine,
On time and meeting in the room untrimm’d;
For thy eternal summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of those pitches thou owest;
For shall Bwog say thou meet’st at 9 (pm) today,
When in Lerner 510 to time thou growest:
So long as minds can pitch or eyes can see,
So long lives this and this gives life to thee.

Image via Wikimedia

Oct

14

Written by

we are almost at peak fall

Feeling saucy? Love Bwog? Sign up for our weekly newsletter and never look back.

Happening in the World: Migrants in Riace, Italy, a town famous for being immigration-friendly, will be transferred away per order of the Italian government. Mayor Domenico Lucano, long praised for his integration plan, has been placed under house arrest.

Happening in the US: Brian Kemp, Georgia’s Republican nominee for governor this November, has been found to have stalled 53,000 voter applications, most of whom are black and minority voters. He faces Democratic nominee Stacey Abrams next month, who could become the first black woman in the US to be governor.

Happening in NYC: The NYC Handmade Bazaar is today from 10am – 5:30pm! Take a zip downtown for a fair featuring handmade art, clothing, jewelry, food, furniture, and more.

spotted: halloween in full blast at noco

Also! The Morgan Library and Museum is hosting the Monster Masquerade this Thursday, 10/18, from 6-8pm: sketch live models, listen to live music, and try out in the costume contest (it’s free admission with your CUID)!

Happening on campus: Check out “Embodied Cognition and Prosthetics: Are Our Tools Part of Our Bodies?” tomorrow from 4-6pm!

 

 

Poem of the Day:

And then the day came,
when the risk
to remain tight
in a bud
was more painful
than the risk
it took
to blossom.

Anais Nin, Risk

Oct

13

Written by

An example of a Coke Freestyle machine, clearly the superlative way to obtain beverages of the better brand.

Social Media Editor Zack Abrams recently realized the inherent tension between Columbia meal halls, which have Coca-Cola products, and Barnard meal halls, which have Pepsi Products. That’s wack, right? 

This isn’t going to be a very long post, I’ve just been recently thinking about how it’s weird that Columbia and Barnard, these terrific twins who flank Broadway, these premier institutions of Manhattan, each represent a different side of that everlasting soda war.

No matter whether you think Coke products are generally better or if you’re wrong, I think we can all agree that Barnard students will never feel welcome at Columbia, and vice versa, unless we can all drink the same drinks in solidarity. If that means Columbia has to give up those shiny Freestyle machines of the future in favor of the outdated, dirty fountains that Barnard enjoys, so be it. It’s worth the price to pay to bring these two communities together.

Diana pizza. JJ’s fries. Hewitt pasta. (Allegedly it’s good, I wouldn’t know, I don’t eat at Hewitt) Each campus has so much to offer in the food arena. But it would help if it didn’t feel like crossing no-man’s-land every time I filled up my Diana cup with that godawful chemical concoction masquerading itself as “Cherry Pepsi.” It’s worth it for the pizza, but, c’mon.

Barnard students: lay down your fountains, join the future. Or, like, you don’t have to casually worship a capitalist behemoth you can just ask the dining halls nicely to change to Coke products. Can we have a referendum on that? I’m down for a referendum.

Coca-Cola Curves via Flickr

 

Oct

13

Written by

Homer’s Declassified School Survival Guide

Sometimes it’s nice to pretend that we can get some life-applicable skills out of our Core readings. Guest writer Olivia Grinberg-Phillips has collected some Homeric takeaways she thinks everyone ought to know.

Although most of us are knee-deep in midterms, in reality, the Fall and Thanksgiving breaks are just around the corner (a very exciting and spooky corner at that). It’s during those breaks that many of us will go home to our eagerly waiting families. Once there, we will relax, dine, recuperate, and inevitably have to answer that dreaded question: “So what did you learn at school?” Now, despite the fact that we attend a world-class, Ivy League institution, it’s understandable that our minds will most likely draw a painful blank– causing one family member to bitch about the cost of Columbia, while a cantankerous grandparent rants about how “back in my day, we gave a damn about our education…”

So, unless starting family quibbles is your cup of tea (or some bourgeois, seasonal Starbucks drink), I’ve put together a list of 5 life lessons from Homer’s Odyssey that not only should every college freshman be aware of, but that will also make excellent, Lit Hum-sourced answers to the question “What did you learn at Columbia?”

Tell me, Muse, of the advice of many ways

Oct

13

here’s some of my sick weaving!

Bwogger Mary Clare Greenlees loves the Design Center and thinks that you should too. Full Disclosure: She also works there. 

To the Design Center in the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Center for Teaching and Learning,

First, I would like to thank BarnardWorks for bringing us together. While searching for a job I came across the Lab Assistant position in the Design Center. They wanted someone who had experience working with different types of tools such as 3D printers, sewing machines, power tools, soldering, etc. and would be comfortable learning more tools. I had worked at a maker space at home so I thought this would be a perfect opportunity, even if I didn’t get the job.

Thankfully, I got the job! I had previous experience with 3D printers, power tools, and soldering equipment, but I had never properly learned how to use a sewing machine. My supervisors were happy to help! And within a few days, I made a crop top, pillowcase, and a tiny bag to hold apples. And from there, I jumped I became interested in different textile arts, like embroidery and weaving (!!). This exploration would not have been possible without the openness of the staff and their willingness to teach anyone who walks through the glass doors (as long as you have been safety trained which likes 40 minutes MAX). I can now create screen prints using a vinyl cutter (and make stickers!). I can use a sewing machine to make clothes that actually fit me. I can hand embroider clothes (in the process of repurposing my old Model UN shirt). And with my new-found confidence in making, am self-teaching myself how to weave! I never thought that I start my first year of college absolutely obsessed with textiles, but here I am.

Learn how far my undying love of the Design Center goes.

Oct

13

Written by

No Gatsby-themed party can ever prosper. For example, my Gatsby prom made me miss the ACT.

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.
On Campus:

  • The Hindu festival of Navaratri starts this weekend! At 8 PM tonight, Hindu Students Organization invites everyone to Low Library to learn about Navaratri – an evening of free Indian dinner, music and Garba dance. Free RSVP through Eventbrite.
  • Katherine Wilkinson’s directing thesis LORDES  premieres Wednesday through Saturday at the Lenfest Center for the Arts. Inspired by the work of feminist writer Audre Lorde, an ensemble of 50 women relive Lorde’s battle through her final poem.  Free tickets for CUID holders with code AUDRE.
  • This Thursday through Saturday, check out CU Players’ The Great Gatsby in the Glicker-Milstein Theater. Adapted by Simon Levy from F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel – it’s bound to be more interesting than your high school English class. Tickets $6.50 with CUID.

Off-Campus:

  •  It’s never too early to shop for Christmas presents… for yourself. Today until 5:30 PM, head to Grand Bazaar NYC for the Handmade Bazaar: a shopping festival of fashion, art, jewelry, housewares, food and more from talented makers. Free admission.

At least I didn’t end up in a swimming pool via Wikimedia Commons

Oct

13

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Happening in the World: After spending two years in a Turkish prison, American pastor, Andrew Brunson, was released. He was one of the reported tens of thousands of people arrested following the failed coup in 2016. He was accused of espionage and was charged with being a member of the Fetullah Terrorist Organization, the group which Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan blamed for the coup. Many hope that Brunson’s release will ease tensions between Turkey and the United States.

Happening in the US:  On Friday, Pope Francis accepted the resignation of Cardinal Donald Wuerl, the archbishop of Washington D.C., who was named over 200 times in the 900-page Pennsylvania grand jury report on covering up sexual abuse during his tenure as Pittsburg’s Archbishop. Many victims of clerical abuse hoped that this signaled the Pope’s commitment to holding church officials accountable for the abuse. However, the Pope instead cited Cardinal Wuerl’s “nobility” in volunteering to resign.

Happening in NYC: A New York City comptroller survey has found that 65% of NYC Housing Authority buildings have unsecured doors. This means that they either have a missing lock or the latch is broken. The investigation was launched after a resident spoke out at a town hall meeting, stating that her building lacked a working door for 19 years.

Happening on Campus: Imposter syndrome is defined as the “persistent feelings of inadequacy despite evident success.” Dr. Valerie Young, an internationally-known expert on imposter syndrome will be giving a talk titled, Why Capable People Suffer From Imposter Syndrome and How to Thrive in Spite of It on Tuesday, 11:30 am to 1 pm on how to battle this demon.

Documentary of the Week:  The Art of Making a Tapestry is a 9-minute thing of beauty that convinced me to go out and make my own handloom from scratch so that I could learn how to weave. The highly intricate art form has been around for thousands of years, and to make a large-sized tapestry takes several years. However, the weavers in this mini-documentary are not looking for the end masterpiece, but are focused on enjoying the act of creation and creativity that go into weaving. This documentary made me very low-key consider dropping out of college to become an apprentice weaver in France.

picture of Cardinal Donald Wuerl via Wikimedia Commons

Oct

12

Written by

we love girl power in poetry!

As I entered Barnard’s Sulzberger Parlor I had three consecutive thoughts: this room is pretty, I’m tired, and I look and feel like a drowned rat. Underneath all this, I was excited, I love poetry, but it was a dismal Thursday night, I’d had classes all day, and there are midterms that I still have yet to study for. Nonetheless, I settled down and, too socially awkward to go to the back of the room to get snacks, waited for the readings to start.

I had been intending to take notes, but I found that once the poets began reading I couldn’t take my eyes off of them. As they spoke, I was taken out of Barnard, out of New York City, and on a journey. The first poet, Mary Szybist, took me to a plain of angels. Angels of rain (appropriate), alchemy, and bliss. A stillness descended over the room when she read elegies to her mother, yet in moments of such raw grief, she still managed to evoke some genuine, not sadistic, laughter. In that moment, I felt honored to witness her vulnerability and humanity.

With Tarfia Faizullah, the second poet to speak, I traveled to a mother and father in Northern Iraq, to a young boy in Bangladesh, to seeds in the ground of West Texas. In twenty minutes, I journeyed through her life, her father’s life, through her aunt’s life.

click here for more poetry

Oct

12

Written by

A Barnard alum couldn’t do it, but maybe these students can

Although many are still bristling from Cynthia Nixon’s (BC ’87) loss in the primaries – meaning a likely four more years in office for Governor Andrew Cuomo and his notoriously broken MTA – her legacy, and promise to repair the subway, have not been forgotten at her alma mater. Last night, Barnard and Columbia’s all-female improv group took Cuomo to task at the Glicker-Milstein Theatre with their first performance of the year. To a packed house, the students explored such familiar topics as Tinder dates, prom memories, and skeletons.

Improv is really hard. Control Top made it look easy. The students did a very good job of making something out of nearly nothing – all they had to work with were two stools and one word to inform their scenes  – and the somethings were hilarious. The cohesion among Control Top’s members resulted in smooth scene transitions and fantastic rapport, showcasing the hard work each student puts into their performance.

The scenes moved across the time, with scenes referencing both Banksy’s self-destructive tendencies and King Arthur. The characters played ranged from typical suburban families to advertising execs to Columbia Econ majors. Many scenes had great moments of physical comedy and visual gags as well as more conventional jokes that drew a lot of laughs from the audience. The reviewer would like to give a shoutout to Cooking With Bwog mastermind Cara Hudson-Erdman (BC ’21), but every member shined on that dimly-lit stage.

Control Top has two more performances planned this semester, on 11/10 and 12/13. 

Oct

12

Written by

here’s a relaxing photo. it’s going to be okay :)

Now that the first series of STEM midterms are safely behind us, it’s a good time to think about ways in which we can improve our test-taking skills for the next batch of exams. In this week’s edition of Science 101, Bwog Science Editor, Intro Bio TA, and science intro-sequence veteran Alex Tang brings you his advice on what to do if you didn’t do so hot on your first midterm.

Most of us know that feeling – you log onto Canvas to check that grade from last week’s gen chem or astrophysics or immunology midterm. You’re expecting a B+, a B maybe… you know you definitely missed two questions, but everything else seemed okay. You click to see your grade, a feeling akin to ripping out a bandaid. Your heart sinks – you flunked. What went wrong?

  • Don’t panic. Chances are, you’re allowed to drop your lowest test score (for me, gen chem, Mowsh bio, and orgo have had this policy – double check your syllabus though). If this is the case, you’re effectively still on a clean slate, albeit with an unpleasant wake-up call. In many of my science courses, my first midterm did end up being the score that I dropped, so it’s definitely likely that you’ll improve if you put in more work. Many compassionate professors have this policy because they want students to acclimate to the structure and pace of the class, and to adjust their study habits accordingly. If you can’t drop an exam, don’t fret. Your midterm is weighted lighter than your upcoming exams, so a comeback is definitely within reach (you’ll just really need to work for it).
  • Debrief how the test went. When you left the testing room, did you have that gut feeling that you did poorly? Or was the bad grade a shock to you? Did you run out of time on the exam? Were most of your errors due to carelessness, or a lack of understanding the content? Go over every mistake you made on the exam, and analyze why you made that mistake. Figure out what concepts you missed, what types of problems tended to trip you up, and how you could avoid making those errors next time.
  • Debrief your study methods (work smarter). Based on your analysis of how the test went wrong (previous tip), figure out how you can modify your study methods to avoid the same types of errors you made on the previous exam. Your optimal study habits might depend on the class you’re taking. For example:
    • If you’re in a quantitative STEM class, it’s possible that you spent too much time reading the textbook, and not enough time practicing the actual assigned practice problems. It’s especially imperative to redo practice problems that you got wrong the first time.
    • If you were tripped up by specific pieces of content on the exam, it’s possible that you might need to read lecture notes more carefully. Some classes post comprehensive lecture notes or recordings (eg. Mowsh bio or immunology), where any detail could be tested. It might be a good idea to review the material a couple times after lecture until you’re familiar with all the small details.

Click here for additional tips

Oct

12

Written by

HARDWARE university HOUSEWARES

Managing Editor Betsy Ladyzhets needed a vacuum cleaner. In order to solve this problem, she walked a couple of blocks to University Hardware & Housewares, then wandered through the store. During her journey, she noticed that the store sells a lot more than meets the eye. This post is part of our new ShopHop series highlighting unique businesses in Morningside Heights.

My roommate and I needed a vacuum cleaner. Like, really needed a vacuum cleaner. Like, our floor was starting to look like the aftermath of a kindergarten class’ arts and crafts hour needed a vacuum cleaner. I could’ve ordered one online or taken the subway down to Bed Bath & Beyond, but I had a suspicion that I could find one with much less shipping and handling required. So, I headed out of Woodbridge, up to Broadway, and over to 114th Street.

University Hardware & Housewares (or H&H, as I like to call it) is located on Broadway between 114th and 113th Streets, right next to the New York Public Library. Before last summer, this store was split in two: University Hardware and University Housewares, both run by the same owner, and both occupying smaller spaces on the other side of Broadway next to International. The stores combined in July and moved across the street. This new location (the former home of Spirit Halloween) is much larger, allowing H&H to diversify their stock and make their store more easily navigable.

What does “hardware and housewares” encompass? H&H subscribes to a pretty broad definition. As I wandered through the store, I came across the expected pots and pans, glassware, cleaning supplies, and basic repair equipment. But I also found some less conventional sections, including greeting cards, party supplies, multiple rows of keychains, and a few shower shoes. Even on the shelves of normal “houseware items,” I found a few surprises: superhero water bottles among the camelbacks, leopard-print masking tape among the packing supplies. H&H is also carrying on the spirit of Spirit Halloween with a costume section. Everything is well-organized on wire shelves stretching up to the ceiling, clearly labeled with prices more reasonable than you would find at a larger store.

More H&H love and more photos after the jump

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