#new york magazine
New York Publications Write About You


Well, not you specifically, but people you may know. New York Magazine interviewed seniors Bryan Reid, Sam Reisman, and Jesse Horwitz about the best spots around Columbia. Establishments mentioned include Max Caffe (“Hang, Read, and Drink Coffee”) 1020 (“Pickup Spot”) La Negrita (“The Happening Bar”[?]) and Roti Roll (“Late-Night Munchies”).

The Observer, on the other hand, reports much heavier news. English Department heavy-hitter James Shapiro has canceled his legendary seminar “The Book Review,” which aimed to teach future literary critics the art of professional reviewing. Shapiro feels that the downsizing of book review departments and the Internet Age have nearly destroyed the opportunities for young and unknown reviewers to get paid for their work.  Thank goodness Amazon reviews the finer things in life.

Morningside Books is So Indie



Look which local bookshop has made New York Magazine‘s recent quasi-advertorial article thing about how to be “independent”: it’s Morningside Books! Says New York:

The Crowd: Caters to the Upper West Side’s erudite collectors (with first editions from Jimmy Breslin, Updike, etc.) as well as cost-averse Columbia students (a wall’s worth of Penguin Classics).

Sample Find: A vintage 24-volume Charles Dickens set.

What’s Selling? Toni Morrison’s A Mercy. 2915 Broadway; 212-222-3350.

In other news, per New York, Sunday dinner is the new Sunday brunch. Act accordingly.

Joseph Massad: The Sequel?

As one commenter pointed out, this week’s New York Magazine Daily Intelligencer section features a short piece that references an article in the Chronicle of Higher Education that speculates that Joseph Massad might be up for a second round of tenure review. Both the New York piece and the Chronicle piece have no on-the-record information to indicate such, though Columbia PR director cryptically explained that “it is consistent with our review process that cases sometimes extend beyond a single academic year or committee.” In addition, the Chronicle piece quotes Cary Nelson, president of the American Association of University Professors, as saying “that while it is ‘highly unusual’ for a university to establish a second ad hoc review committee, ‘it seems to me a good thing in this case, if questions have been raised about the decision making.’”

According to the Chronicle article — which is only able to be read with a subscription but was luckily forwarded to Bwog in full by tipster David Judd — “[Alan Brinkley's] decision [to deny Massad tenure] followed what professors describe as a narrow [3-2] vote in favor of Mr. Massad by an ad hoc committee of five scholars who judged his tenure file. When the provost subsequently rejected the bid, professors say, the decision prompted an angry letter from senior faculty members at Columbia who support Mr. Massad. They apparently have persuaded the provost to reconsider the case and give the professor the unusual opportunity of a second chance at tenure at Columbia.”

Dartmouth and New York Magazine Call Columbia Out

vs.
 


Today, New York Magazine‘s blog the Daily Intelligencer linked to a Dartmouth student blog that calculated the number of drinking infractions per Ivy League college. Fratty and backwoods-y, Dartmouth was naturally crowned champion. Our fair Alma Mater, came in second to last, just narrowly beating out Penn. New York theorizes that this number is exceedingly low given Columbia’s environs and population. The theory is demonstrated using the extremely mathematical formula: 

Hundreds of Freshman + Dozens of Places to get IDs x Thousands of Delis Where Owners Don’t Care If You Are Underage / Limited Entrances And Exits To Dorms That Are Monitored For Safety = Easily Detectable Drunkenness

Given the formula, New York attributes our low frequency of drinking infractions to our lameness.

Bar fight! 

Your favorite cast of characters

sfsCheck newsstands tomorrow, and you’ll see something familiar: a shiny New York Magazine cover story digesting the last 40 years of crazy activism at Columbia, featuring glamour shots of David Judd, Chris Kulawik, Karina Garcia and a smattering of other rabblerousers. Take a seat, because it’s a doozy, reaching back to the SDS protests of the 60s, racing through Minutemen, and parsing every protest and meeting since then for a larger point about College and the Left (it is New York Mag, after all).

Here are the takeaway points, in case you’re too mired in papers to read the whole thing: Radical kids today don’t have the energy of Mark Rudd & Co. Career-oriented Democrats don’t have the energy of the radicals. Kulawik doesn’t need energy, because he’s got skillz. Columbia has historically been riven by identity politics–mostly around Israel-Palestine–but now the lines are starting to blur.

Well, now everyone else knows.

- LBD

Columbia Student Still Uses LiveJournal, Gets Press

nymagColumbia student (and Spec style editor) Xiyin Tang ’09 was featured in New York magazine’s feature “Say Everything,” discussing her use of LiveJournal and, of course, Facebook.

“Xiyin clicks to her Facebook profile, which features 88 photos… ‘To me, or to a lot of people, it’s like, why go to a party if you’re not going to get your picture taken?’” How very Edie Sedgwick.

There They Go Again

In this week’s issue of New York Magazine, Provost and American History professor Alan Brinkley follows in the steps of department collegue Eric Foner by slamming President Bush. Brinkley’s commentary is a part of the issue’s “psychopolitical survey” in which “a team of historians, Oval Office veterans, and psychotherapists tries to figure out whether Bush is depressed or delusional—and what combination of poor parenting and personality disorders brought things to this point.”

To digress, in the same issue the magazine also offers a brief review of restaurants within three blocks’ range of Amsterdam and 113th. Whether or not the enticing dining descriptions are accurate is your call.

Early-Afternoon Delight

1) If you’ve been ignoring your inbox lately, you probably haven’t heard that Columbia will be graced with the presence of the MIT linguistics expert, sometimes-anarchist, and general wise old man, Noam Chomsky. First, Chomsky will speak about Renaissance man Harold Pinter (weird, no?) for five dollars at Miller Theatre.  But if you’d rather hear him talk about the topic that made him famous, he’ll be at the Italian House on the night of February 5th.  Get tickets for the Miller event here.

2)  The website of New York Magazine recently launched an interactive version of its approval matrix online.  Now web-crawlers can vote on what’s high-brow, low-brow, despicable and brilliant, rather than being indoctrinated by the editors of the magazine.  Example: Marcel’s performance in last night’s Top Chef = low-brow + despicable.

3) El Presidente Bush. In an interview with USA Today’s David Jackson, 43 responds to Columbia historian Eric Foner’s accusation that he’s the worst President ever.  When he is asked to share the lessons he learned from LBJ’s war in Vietnam, Bush replies: “Win.”

- JDC

Everyone needs a little official validation

As if you didn’t already have enough reason to go, Rack & Soul–the newish fried chicken place on Broadway at 109th–has ranked a respectable 47th on New York Magazine’s invaluable Best Cheap Eats list. In the other direction, on 131st st., Dinosaur BBQ came in 65th.

Because, you know, Manhattan above 96th is only good for down-home southern cooking.

Columbia seniors preen, Lie

New York Magazine has been collecting a little senior wisdom of its own, polling 100 of this year’s grads on issues ranging from the great books to Hillary’s judgment of our generation. Bwog is skeptical of some of the responses: 28% of you expect to make over a quarter million a year in a decade? 27% don’t have a facebook, MySpace, or blog? And 11% engage in emotion-free casual sex as a favorite form of instant gratification? Come on, y’all. Be real now.

Yay! We are smart! (But Bollinger is not.)

Prestige-obsessed Columbians should be pleased to hear that 3 2 3 of the 5 most influential “idea-makers” in New York (as ranked by New York Magazine) work at Columbia!

Everyone else should at least get some morbid thrill to know that on said magazine’s list of the 5 most influential New Yorkers in education, our own PrezBo appears not.

Update: Adding to the irony, he did make the cut for real estate.

Update 2: Robert Thurman (Uma’s dad) made it in religion.

Blogs to Riches

According to an article in New York magazine, the Bwog won’t have to worry about money after graduation, because we’ll be making bank with this newfangled web log, so long as we completely uppend the Blog power structure, that is. We’ll take all y’all on, blogitches!