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Nov

17

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Will you still love me when I’m no longer young and beautiful?

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

On Campus:

  • Miller Theater’s Pop-Up Concerts series continues with Isabel Lepanto Gleicher, a rising talent in the flute scene. From the website: “For her solo debut at Miller, she has curated a program of flute works that are perfect for the intimate setting of a Pop-Up concert.” See it free On Tuesday, 6 PM.
  • Also on Tuesday (12 PM), Amherst Professor Klára Móricz comes to the Harriman Institute to discuss one of the most interesting phenomena in enduring Russian culture: the near-worship of Pushkin. In “Pushkin Divided,” she will discuss how Pushkin was appropriated differently by the Russian emigrant community in 1930s Paris, and by the Soviet Russian state.

Off Campus

  • Tonight at 7 PM, head down to Performance Space New York for Acephalous Monster, a theatrical exhibit by Ron Athey. The “Acéphale” is the headless man, a symbol of transformation between man and god, between the mundane and the radically sacred. Student tickets $15. https://ci.ovationtix.com/203/production/997583?performanceId=10316520
  • Monday, 8 PM, The Tank. High by the Beach: The Odyssey meets Lana del Rey. I don’t know what this is. But. I want to go. Tickets $10.

Image via Flickr

Nov

13

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He survived beatings, shootings, stabbings and poisonings, but not the transition to theater.

Thanks to rush tickets, you’re only an early morning and $39 away from seeing any show on Broadway. But how do you know it’s worth it? Bwog offers a handy guide to which musical or play you’re sure to like, according to your favorite meal spot on campus.

John Jay – Anastasia

You’ve been wandering in the frozen wastes of St. Petersburg for what seems like years, your memory a sea of blankness – wait, no, you’re just standing in front of the air conditioners. If you’re a fan of the dining hall with the most early-20th century architecture and the longest tables, you’re probably full of nostalgia and a healthy appreciation for communism. Go see Anastasia. It may have cut out Russia’s greatest love machine, but you’ll be humming “Ra Ra Rasputin” the whole time anyway.

JJ’s – Pretty Woman
Let’s be real: you’re not here for substance. You want something hot, fast and satisfying. You’re probably drunk and horny, which is the ideal mindset for seeing Pretty Woman. Is the plot good? No. Is Samantha Barks unbelievably gorgeous and talented? Yes. Are you over your Les Misérables phase? Probably not. Should you get another order of curly fries? If God can’t stop you, neither can I.

Diana – The Lifespan of a Fact
You are paralyzed by indecision. You have a paper due in 3 hours and you can’t figure out whether or not a soda, two orders of fries and a large salad packed into a small box counts as a single meal swipe. If your Twitter is anything to go by, you LOVE Harry Potter but HATE J.K. Rowling, so Cursed Child is out of the question. Instead, watch Daniel Radcliffe be paralyzed by indecision for 2 hours in a very competent American accent. Grab some cookies on your way to the theater. No, wait! The cookies are an entrée! THE COOKIES ARE AN ENTRÉE!!!

Ferris – The Prom
You appreciate bright colors, bodily flexibility, and dazzling displays of treats. You’ll stick to the basics (pasta bowl) with a sprinkle of the new on top (olive-pesto-pineapple? Why not!) You are either straight or just a little gay, making The Prom’s watered-down but overwhelmingly positive message of acceptance just right for you.  Next time you’re waiting in that long pasta line, snap up some tickets for a heartwarming show about a high schooler who wants to take her girlfriend to prom, and the Broadway stars who swoop in to make everything worse.

Hewitt – Waitress
Maybe you’re disillusioned. Maybe you’re stuck. Maybe you’re a simple woman/Jew/confused prospie looking for the residence hall, and all you want is some conversation and a home-baked dessert made with love. Waitress is the underrated, surprisingly dirty musical that’s perfect for lovers of an underrated, surprisingly dirty (or is it?) dining hall.

Bonus: Milstein Coffee Bar – The Band’s Visit
Your class schedule said MIL. You ended up in Milstein instead of Milbank. The only thing worse would be mixing up Petah Tikvah with Beit Hatikvah and winding up in a small town in the middle of the desert, where you and your bandmates form unlikely friendships with disillusioned Israelis through the power of music. All will end in love, understanding and/or old avocado toast.

A cat that really was gone via Wikimedia Commons

Nov

10

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Several Bwoggers attended the Friday night premiere of The Pale Blue’s Once Upon a Fortnight in the Lerner Black Box. It was a laugh-out-loud show with a lot of promise, but plagued by script and production issues. Arts Editor Riva Weinstein gives her thoughts.

As we enter the Lerner Black Box, we’re handed programs with a picture of a leaping ballerina. The title reads DUCK SWAMP: A New Opera. In full tuxedo, Brent Morden (CC ’19) enters the stage, lifting his arms to the audience. “This is an opera, didn’t you all know?” he warbles. “A serious opera.” The pit swells. With a sudden thud, his co-writer, Daniel Treatman (GS/JTS ’20) collapses onto the stage. It’s murder!

Not, in fact, a ballet by brilliant composers Seymour Butz and Annie Position, the Pale Blue’s Once Upon a Fortnight is an original musical that parodies the noir detective genre. In the mid-80’s, the mayor of New York City is found murdered. Police Commissioner Bruce Fort (Reuben Rahmeyer, SEAS ‘21) recruits his ex-partner in the detective game, Gordon Fine (Robert Willard, CC ’20), to solve the killing. Fine himself gets help from two unpaid interns, Judy (Alexandra Kapilian, CC ‘20) and Rudy (Jonathan Kapilian, SEAS ‘20). While Fine works on the case (or rather, flirts with Fort’s daughter), Fort is encouraged by his secretary Connie (Isobel Obrecht, BC ‘22) to run for mayor himself. Despite the lack of actual detective work, they eventually solve the case by running straight into the barrel of the killer’s gun. (The killer’s banana. The guns are bananas.)

(more…)

Nov

10

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This is why we can’t have nice things, Leontes.

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

On Campus:

  • This Thursday through Saturday at 8 PM, KCST presents: The Winter’s Tale. KCST plays the lesser-known Shakespearean comedy dark, exploring the space between recovery and loss as King Leontes destroys his family in a jealous rage. Show up early to get on the waitlist for free tickets.
  • They’re creepy and they’re kooky… they’re coming to an auditorium near you! Thursday at 8 PM and Friday at 10, make sure to check out CMTS’ The Addams Family, based on the classic comic/TV show/movie series about a lovable supernatural family.  Tickets $8 with CUID.
  • Friday through Saturday, see CUP’s production of Almost, Maine in the Lerner Black Box. Blending elements of physical comedy and magical realism, John Cariani’s “serious comedy” tells the stories of 19 people, dealing with different kinds of love on the same cold night. Tickets $5.50 with CUID.
  • Next Sunday, Nov. 18 at 11 AM, it’s the CU Wind Ensemble’s Fall Concert: Journeys in Music. Come for the wonderful sounds of David Maslanka, Shostakovich, Johan de Meij, and more! Featuring Dr. Paul Cohen on saxophone.

Off Campus

  • Today and tomorrow (Saturday and Sunday), Parasol Projects in the Lower East Side is presenting the Isle of Dogs Art Show, an official artistic tribute to Wes Anderson’s stop-motion film Isle of Dogs. The exhibit and book will showcase the work of over a hundred artists and sculptors.
  • Columbia Ballet Collaborative’s Fall Performances are this weekend! Next Saturday at 8 PM and Sunday at 3, head downtown to the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater for professional-quality student ballet, featuring works by Zhongjing Fang, Silas Farley, Kosta Karakashyan and more. Tickets $10 with CUID.
  • Not enough ballet for you yet? Now through Sunday, Check out CUBE’s Swan Lake at the Manhattan Movement and Arts Center in Midtown! The classic ballet tells the story of a princess turned into a swan by the curse of a sorceress. Tickets from $10.

Image via Wikimedia Commons

Nov

7

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L to R: Severin Fowles, Jhane Myers, Lindsay Montgomery, and Gary Glassman.

Last Friday, Arts Editor and archaeology student Riva Weinstein attended the advance screening of Native America: New Worlds Rising at Barnard. This documentary about the Comanche nation in the colonial era also spotlighted the persistence of indigenous traditions in America today.

I spent thirty glorious days in New Mexico: excavating pottery, bathing in the Rio Grande, hiking through mountains under the hot southwestern sun. It was a privilege to do archaeology there. It was a greater privilege to be welcomed in by the Picuris Pueblo community, who were eager to share their knowledge. This collaboration was the product of decades of careful political work by my advisor, Prof. Severin Fowles, his ex-student Dr. Lindsay Montgomery, and their colleagues at SMU and U of Arizona. They understood that today, for the archaeologists of Native America, collaboration with tribes is not only a mutual benefit but a responsibility.

“We stand in a remarkable moment for new collaborations,” says Sev (as he prefers to be called) to the people assembled in Barnard’s Altschul hall. “There is a growing openness to valuing indigenous knowledge and epistemologies.”

We did our excavations in the small town of Dixon, and visited pueblos across northern New Mexico. But just north of Dixon lies the Rio Grande Gorge: a dramatic landscape of cliffs and deep valleys, covered in dry scrub brush, inhospitable for living but excellent for hiding. While on the trail of Pueblo and U.S. colonial histories, it was there in the Gorge that Sev found another, crucial piece of Native American history.

As the documentary’s title card fades out, it presents us with such a scene. The camera follows Sev as he hikes through the Gorge with Jhane Myers, a Comanche/Blackfeet artist heavily involved in the Comanche community. They pause and kneel beside a large boulder. Faint white lines form the shapes of horses and riders with flowing headdresses. This is some of the first physical evidence of the early Comanche, a powerful Plains tribe whose empire once extended from East Texas and Oklahoma to New Mexico and the Rockies.

Read more about rock art after the jump!

Nov

2

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Wow ok I JUST realized the “UV” stands for UPTOWN VOCAL, I am a DUMBASS

On Tuesday, Arts Editor Riva Weinstein attended Uptown Vocal’s fall concert, S-UV-erstition, in Wein Lounge. She gives her thoughts below.

It’s apple cider season. Wien Lounge is cozy and faux-candlelit, and students mill around as we wait for the performance, pouring drinks and nabbing candy. Uptown Vocal mills around the piano in a cluster of tasteful burgundy and black. As they shuffle into a half-circle, Karinya Ghiara (CC ’19) welcomes us informally to Uptown Vocal’s fall concert. Brent Morden (CC ’19) hums a note, twelve singers take a breath, and they leap together into their first song: “Blue Skies.”

The group’s musicality is smooth and effortless. They embody easy listening without allowing the audience’s attention to flag. They glide from Irving Berlin to Stevie Wonder, as competent in their upbeat doo-wops as they are in their choral homophony. Morden’s skill as a music director really shines in songs like “Autumn Leaves” and “A Foggy Day (in London Town)”: the tonal shifts are exciting without being dissonant. The group is most impressive together in songs like “Basin Street Blues,” jumping right on tricky, syncopated rhythms and complex chords without an ounce of hesitation.

All of Uptown Vocal’s soloists were very competent, but most of them lacked the vocal oomph and physical charisma to make a jazz solo really interesting. That was fine for some of the simpler melodies like “Autumn Leaves”, but for the playful lyrics of songs like “Let’s Do It,” their stage presence fell flat. It wasn’t until Stevie Wonder’s “Superstition” that I found myself paying more attention to the soloist than I was to the whole group’s harmony.

Uptown Vocal indeed saved the best for last. Karinya Ghiara shines in her solo for “Superstition,” capturing the crowd’s attention with her strong, jazzy voice and infectious smile. Jackie Brown’s (CC ’19) smoky tones rounded out the night handsomely with “A Foggy Day”: progressive and atmospheric, with one singer making a foghorn-like sound in the background, the character in Brown’s voice made it feel like the beginning of a musical. Even when they weren’t center stage, Ghiara and Brown consistently caught the audience’s eye, grooving and bouncing contagiously to the beat.

Although Uptown Vocal lacks the cultivated energy of other a capella groups, their bodies suit their music: casual and natural, happy without losing their aura of sophistication. On a weekday October night, with a class of cider in hand, their music was balm for the autumnal soul. We begged for an encore; but Ghiara simply laughed and told us to come to their winter concert for another taste of Uptown Vocal’s dulcet jazz.

Image via Uptown Vocal

Oct

27

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Curioser and curioser.

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

On Campus:

  • “She, herself, said it”: Tonight at 8 PM, head to Miller Theater for Composer Portraits: Kate Soper, whose “theatrical chamber music masterpiece” Ipsa Dixit blends music with Greek theater and screwball comedy. The multi-talented composer will perform with members of the Wet Ink ensemble. Tickets from $7.
  • It’s midsemester concert for Uptown Vocal, Columbia’s student jazz a capella group! Come to Wien Lounge this Tuesday at 7:15 PM for S-UV-ERstition… if only to find out what the title means.
  • Thursday through Saturday at 8 PM, the Columbia Blue Glaze Theatre, which showcases Asian-heritage talent in the performing arts, presents 99 Women directed by Genevieve Wang (BC ’21). The story synthesizes oral histories from 99 women from all over the world. Reserve your free tickets.

Off Campus:

  • • You know that feeling you get when you watch a Studio Ghibli movie and everything seems beautiful and whimsical and right with the world? That feeling wouldn’t be possible without the incredible work of composer Joe Hisaishi. Next Friday at Carnegie Hall, Hisaishi will conduct a full orchestra and choir with scores from Princess Mononoke, My Neighbor Totoro, Spirited Away, and other movies.
  • The La MaMa Puppet festival, which showcases cutting-edge puppet theater by artists around the world, begins this Thursday at The Downstairs with Wunderkammer | Cabinet of Curiosities. A trio of puppeteers bring a cabinet of strange and mystical marionettes to life. Also check out Tian Wen by Hua Hua Zhang, a stunning “dreamscape” based on a classic Chinese poem. Student tickets $20.

My elementary school desk via Wikimedia Commons

Oct

20

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A literal Angel.

This Friday, Arts Editor Riva Weinstein headed to the Minor Latham Playhouse for the Barnard Theater Department’s performance of Peer Gynt. The verdict: WHOA.

Loki. Coyote. Anansi. Hermes. Jack. Trickster characters are almost a universal human archetype, looming large out of stories from across the world, thrilling audiences with their cleverness, wit, and – nearly always – their masculinity. Peer Gynt is one such folkloric hero, a troll-killing hunter from a Norwegian folk tale. But when Peer Gynt leapt onstage at the Barnard Theater Department’s Saturday night performance, the Trickster splintered and reshaped itself in a totally new image.

In the opening scene, the young Peer Gynt (Angel Dudley, GS ‘19) excitedly recounts the story of a stag-hunting expedition, while her mother Aase (Lydia Georgantzi, GS ’22) berates her for being a useless daughter. Peer hears that the rich farmer’s daughter Ingrid (Bailey Coleman, BC ‘19), who is about to be married, once had feelings for her. She immediately rushes off to steal the bride. Peer is banished for her crime, and spends the next several decades wandering among troll kingdoms, Moroccan beaches, Bedouin tribes, mental institutions, and the high seas.

Henrik Ibsen’s play is a highly psychological, nearly Modernist rendering of a folktale universe. Peer ceaselessly struggles with, and rejects civilized society as “Lies, lies, a bunch of goddamned poetry.” She seeks a completely unrestrained, natural self. But as the play progresses, she is tormented by her own morality in the guise of various characters: the “Great Between,” the “Button-maker,” and her husband Solveig (Jordan Mahr, CC ‘20) who waits for her at home. In the end, Peer is forced to face the fact that in all her time exploiting the world in the interest of individualism, she has almost never truly been “herself.”

To thine own self be true enough…

Oct

20

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Not exactly the Beat Generation.

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

On Campus:

  • Tomorrow at 7 PM, head to Roone Auditorium for Chamak: Night at the Bazaar, a fabulous fashion show and performance hosted by CU’s Organization of Pakistani Students. Tickets $5 with CUID.
  • This Thursday through Saturday at 8 PM, NOMADS – Columbia’s group for student-written theater – presents The Other Side, a new play by Eden Gordon. It centers around the lives of Beat Generation writers Joyce Johnson and Elise Cowen. Tickets $5 with CUID.
  • Also Thursday through Saturday, CU’s Shakespeare and Shakespeare-adjacent troupe, KCST, presents Mourning Becomes Electra: A Eugene O’Neill play based on the Greek epic Oresteia. This postwar drama centers around Orin and Lavinia Mannon, a brother and sister seeking revenge on their mother for their father’s death. Free RSVP here.
  • Tired of all this drama? For a few laughs, come to Third Wheel Improv’s Saturday night show in Lerner, Third Wheel Gets Ghosted.

Off Campus:

  • This Monday, head to the NYPL on 5th avenue for The Language of Crises: a book talk with essayist Rebecca Solnit. Her new collection Call Them By Their True Names deals with “battles over meaning, place, language and belonging – pillars that define the crises of our time.” $25 rush rickets.

Image via Flickr

Oct

13

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No Gatsby-themed party can ever prosper. For example, my Gatsby prom made me miss the ACT.

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.
On Campus:

  • The Hindu festival of Navaratri starts this weekend! At 8 PM tonight, Hindu Students Organization invites everyone to Low Library to learn about Navaratri – an evening of free Indian dinner, music and Garba dance. Free RSVP through Eventbrite.
  • Katherine Wilkinson’s directing thesis LORDES  premieres Wednesday through Saturday at the Lenfest Center for the Arts. Inspired by the work of feminist writer Audre Lorde, an ensemble of 50 women relive Lorde’s battle through her final poem.  Free tickets for CUID holders with code AUDRE.
  • This Thursday through Saturday, check out CU Players’ The Great Gatsby in the Glicker-Milstein Theater. Adapted by Simon Levy from F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel – it’s bound to be more interesting than your high school English class. Tickets $6.50 with CUID.

Off-Campus:

  •  It’s never too early to shop for Christmas presents… for yourself. Today until 5:30 PM, head to Grand Bazaar NYC for the Handmade Bazaar: a shopping festival of fashion, art, jewelry, housewares, food and more from talented makers. Free admission.

At least I didn’t end up in a swimming pool via Wikimedia Commons

Oct

6

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img October 06, 201811:10 amimg 0 Comments

Help me, Control Top, whoever the fuck you are, you’re my only ho

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

On Campus:

  • This Thursday, 9 PM in the Glicker-Milstein Theater, Control Top fixes the MTA. It’s about damn time an improv comedy group did something about that.
  • This Friday, Oct. 12 is Chinese Students’ Club 2018 Night Market: Illuminate! Head to Low Plaza at 6 PM for a capella performance, lion dance, sketch comedy, bubble tea and food. Stop by CCSC’s table to win a cool shirt.
  • On Saturday, celebrated French actress Jeanne Balibar performs Les Historiennes at the French Institute, grappling with the lives and struggles of three historical women: Violette Noziere, a criminal, Delphine Seyrig, an actress, and Pascoa, a slave. But if you can’t make it to Midtown (or you don’t like subtitles), head to Buell Hall this Friday instead. “Women’s Voices, Women’s Stories” is a roundtable conversation with Balibar and the three historians who researched and wrote about the women she explores in Les Historiennes. They will discuss how to give life to women from the past, and the different kinds of emancipation those women experienced.

Off Campus:

  • Wednesday at 6:30 PM, 79-year-old lesbian artist Barbara Hammer comes to the Whitney for The Art of Dying. In this performative lecture, Hammer will ruminate on her experiences of making art while living with cancer. Free standby tickets will be available an hour before the start time.
  • This weekend at The Tank, it’s the premiere of The Amazing Story Machine, a play jam-packed with physical comedy, puppetry and live music. The Grimm family are about to reveal their new Story Machine when the device malfunctions, forcing them to find brand new ways of storytelling. Tickets $20, check site for dates.

Immortal words of Carrie Fisher via Bwog Archives

Oct

3

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Don’t believe a word she says.

This Tuesday, Arts Editor Riva Weinstein returned to the Harriman Institute for the opening of painter-historian Anne Bobroff-Hajal’s exhibit “Playground of the Autocrats,” and her talk, “Peasants, Clans, and Effervescent Absolutists.” What is an effervescent absolutist? Why does Russia keep slipping back into autocracy? Why does that baby have a mustache? All will be revealed below.

Take the last 450 years of Russian history. Add in a slice of Monty Python, a chunk of political cartooning, a generous helping of Where’s Waldo, a vaudeville soundtrack and a distinct odor of the Brechtian macabre, and you’ve got Peasants, Clans, and Effervescent Absolutists: a spectacular new exhibit by painter and historian Anne Bobroff-Hajal.

Bobroff-Hajal’s paintings are overwhelmingly visual. Fashioned in the style of polyptych icons, the huge canvases overflow with color and tightly-packed information. Ivan the Terrible leers as boyars (pre-17th century nobles) cling to his robes. Colorful skeletons grovel at Stalin’s feet. Peter the Great maneuvers a fantastic winged boat. A mustachioed baby Stalin listens, while the tsars of old give him advice on how to maintain power by exploiting the peasantry.

It’s easy to believe that Bobroff-Hajal first conceived this project as an animated film. The larger-than-life characters – like a winged Catherine the Great, supported by her subjects on stilts – spout lyrics to music from the traditional tune Kalinka: “You’ll want to bring back serfdom quick so you can reign nonstop!/But you can’t call it serfdom, Joe, ‘cause that would be a flop!” By weaving “satirical stories” into her pieces, says Bobroff-Hajal, she’s hoped to make some of the complicated tragedies of Russian history accessible and entertaining to the public.

And it’s not an easy task…

Sep

29

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This is your brain on imperialism.

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

On Campus:

  • Concerts, concerts everywhere! Looking for vocal acid jazz? Sahana Narayanan and the Faculty house have you covered this Wednesday. Prefer Latin jazz? Acclaimed musicians abound this Thursday at the Event Oval. Rather try something a little new, like groovy Brazilian choro? Regional de NY is performing next Saturday at the Miller Theater. Rather stick to the basics? The quintessential Julliard String Quartet would love to see you at the Broadway Presbyterian Church on Thursday. Check event pages for ticket information.
  • There’s a new art exhibit up at the Harriman Institute, and it involves baby Stalin. Head to the International Affairs building this Tuesday for an opening (yes, wine) and talk with Anne Bobroff-Hajal about her exhibit, Peasants, Clans, and Effervescent Absolutists. Her pieces explore how Russia’s ruling elites have exploited the population throughout history to retain power.
  • Third Wheel Improv sneaks in the first show of the semester this Friday, October 5th at 9 PM. Head to John Jay Lounge for Third Wheel Improv Finds its Real Dad to find out if you ARE or ARE NOT Third Wheel Improv’s father.

Off Campus:

  • Tomorrow at 5 PM, head to Common Notions publishing house in Brooklyn for a talk with Silvia Federici about her new book Witches, Witch-Hunting and Women. Federici examines the modern war on women in the context of 16th- and 17th century witch hunts, revisiting the themes of Caliban and the Witch.
  • Comic Con starts this weekend! Do you have your tickets? There’s no missing out on one of the world’s largest celebrations of comics, pop culture, art, cosplay and more.

Catherine the Great via the Harriman Institute

Sep

22

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img September 22, 201811:31 amimg 1 Comments

You wished you looked like this in 7th grade.

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

On Campus:

  • This Wednesday and Friday, head to the Miller Theater for the New York premiere of Proving Up, a new opera by Missy Mazzoli and Royce Vavrek. Proving Up is the harrowing tale of a family in post-Civil War Nebraska pursuing the American Dream. Check the event page for ticket pricing.
  • Love films, but think they could be a little more? (I know, I miss Shrek 4D too.) Next Saturday, Sep 9, check out Raba at the Lenfest Center: a collection of cinema pieces performed with live musical accompaniment, described by textura as “a multi-dimensional presentation that feels expansive and inviting.”

Off Campus:

  • Quick! What was your favorite phase you went through as a teenager? If you said your pop punk/Avril Lavigne phase in 7th grade, you’re objectively right. Head downtown to Le Poisson Rouge to see Pop Punk High, an original musical comedy featuring skateboards, excessive eyeliner and the ghost of Avril Lavigne. Tickets from $25, check the site for dates.
  • Monday at 7pm, everyone’s favorite feminist bookstore Bluestockings is hosting Get On The Stage: an open mic showcasing the voices of trans, nonbinary and queer people of color. Check out the Facebook event page to become a speaker or attendee (free!)

She’s not dead, though? via Wikimedia Commons

Sep

15

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Now, it WILL be on display until June, but you won’t get free wine.

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

On Campus:

  • Next Thursday, Sep. 20, head to Miller Theater for the opening of Redecode II: La Dorada, a new installation from Dominican-American artist Joiri Minaya. Minaya explores and deconstructs “tropical” design, especially in relation to the female subject, as an exotifying invention of the Global North. Come for a conversation with Minaya and Wallach Art Gallery curator Deborah Cullen.
  • Sep. 14-16 and Sep. 20-23, the Lenfest Center for the Arts is hosting NY Indie Guy: Ira Deutchman and the Rise of Independent Film, honoring the work of CU Film Professor Ira Deutchman in distributing, marketing and producing hundreds of independent films. Check out the Lenfest site for a full lineup of the groundbreaking films being screened each evening, many of which boast a Q&A talkback with the filmmakers or performers. ($8 per film with CUID)

Off Campus:

  • Next Friday, September 21 is College Night at the Frick Collection! All undergrad and grad students are invited to this Gilded Age-era mansion for a free night of live music, gallery talks, sketching, and more.
  • This weekend, World Maker Faire returns for its 9th year to the New York Hall of Science in Queens. It’s one of the East Coast’s biggest science fairs, showcasing new technology, innovation, art, fashion and much more. Check out the website for the lineup of workshops and events.

Recode II: La Dorada via the Miller Theater

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