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Sep

22

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img September 22, 201811:31 amimg 1 Comments

You wished you looked like this in 7th grade.

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

On Campus:

  • This Wednesday and Friday, head to the Miller Theater for the New York premiere of Proving Up, a new opera by Missy Mazzoli and Royce Vavrek. Proving Up is the harrowing tale of a family in post-Civil War Nebraska pursuing the American Dream. Check the event page for ticket pricing.
  • Love films, but think they could be a little more? (I know, I miss Shrek 4D too.) Next Saturday, Sep 9, check out Raba at the Lenfest Center: a collection of cinema pieces performed with live musical accompaniment, described by textura as “a multi-dimensional presentation that feels expansive and inviting.”

Off Campus:

  • Quick! What was your favorite phase you went through as a teenager? If you said your pop punk/Avril Lavigne phase in 7th grade, you’re objectively right. Head downtown to Le Poisson Rouge to see Pop Punk High, an original musical comedy featuring skateboards, excessive eyeliner and the ghost of Avril Lavigne. Tickets from $25, check the site for dates.
  • Monday at 7pm, everyone’s favorite feminist bookstore Bluestockings is hosting Get On The Stage: an open mic showcasing the voices of trans, nonbinary and queer people of color. Check out the Facebook event page to become a speaker or attendee (free!)

She’s not dead, though? via Wikimedia Commons

Sep

15

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img September 15, 20182:24 pmimg 0 Comments

Now, it WILL be on display until June, but you won’t get free wine.

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

On Campus:

  • Next Thursday, Sep. 20, head to Miller Theater for the opening of Redecode II: La Dorada, a new installation from Dominican-American artist Joiri Minaya. Minaya explores and deconstructs “tropical” design, especially in relation to the female subject, as an exotifying invention of the Global North. Come for a conversation with Minaya and Wallach Art Gallery curator Deborah Cullen.
  • Sep. 14-16 and Sep. 20-23, the Lenfest Center for the Arts is hosting NY Indie Guy: Ira Deutchman and the Rise of Independent Film, honoring the work of CU Film Professor Ira Deutchman in distributing, marketing and producing hundreds of independent films. Check out the Lenfest site for a full lineup of the groundbreaking films being screened each evening, many of which boast a Q&A talkback with the filmmakers or performers. ($8 per film with CUID)

Off Campus:

  • Next Friday, September 21 is College Night at the Frick Collection! All undergrad and grad students are invited to this Gilded Age-era mansion for a free night of live music, gallery talks, sketching, and more.
  • This weekend, World Maker Faire returns for its 9th year to the New York Hall of Science in Queens. It’s one of the East Coast’s biggest science fairs, showcasing new technology, innovation, art, fashion and much more. Check out the website for the lineup of workshops and events.

Recode II: La Dorada via the Miller Theater

Sep

12

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“The Hubris of Man” (Mixed Media, 2018.)

Happening in the world: According to a report from Human Rights Watch (HRW), the Chinese government is installing QR codes in the homes of the Uighur Muslim community in Xinjiang. This is part of a crackdown on minorities that involves the collecting of biometric data and arbitrary detention in “internment camps.”

Happening in the US: Category 4 hurricane Florence will reach the Carolinas and Virginia on late Thursday and into Friday. Hurricane and storm warnings have been issued, and there may be catastrophic inland and river flooding.

Happening in NYC: Eduardo Kobra’s massive, seven-story mural of a firefighter, entitled “The Braves of 9/11”, was unveiled yesterday in Midtown. Kobra wrote that the piece was meant to “pass on a message of life, of a restart, of reconstruction.”

Happening on Campus: Didn’t meet your best friend at NSOP? There’s still hope: University Life Events Council is hosting a “speed friending” event in Wein Lounge at 5pm tonight. Games and free Insomnia cookies!

Overseen: Abandoned popcorn with Juul pod outside JJ’s.

Image via Levi Cohen

Sep

8

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Disclaimer: they may not look like this in September.

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

On Campus:

  • Tomorrow (Sunday) from noon to 8pm, head to Sakura Park at West 122nd and Riverside for the Sakura Park Festival: an exciting, global selection of live music, dance, games, and activities led by renowned artisans. Check out the website for the full lineup of activities and to RSVP.
  • If your academic year doesn’t begin with Slovak organ music, did it even really start? Head to the James Chapel next Saturday, September 15 for a welcome concert featuring Jan Michalko. The distinguished organist will perform works by Ilja Zeljenka and L’udovit Rajter as well as Bach, Rinck and others.

Off Campus:

  • Tonight, Sep. 8 is your last chance to see the Drilling Company’s Bryant Park Shakespeare performance of Macbeth. Head to Bryant Park at 7:00 P.M. to see this mid-1800s-styled take on the Shakespearean classic. Bring a friend and a blanket – it’s free!
  • Tomorrow, head to Brooklyn to check out the Queer + Trans Asian Short Film festival at Secret Project Robot. For a night of Taiwanese comfort food and films celebrating queer & trans Asian experiences, RSVP for free to the 4pm or 6pm showings.
  • Love tea? Want to settle a debate with your boyfriend who thinks coffee is better? Don’t care about tea, but love art? Now until Sep 22, go downtown to Room For Tea NYC, an interactive exhibit celebrating the diversity of humanity’s favorite drink. Tickets $24.

Sakura blossoms via Wikimedia Commons

Sep

4

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It’s Wein-STEEN, NOT Wein-STINE!!!

Second only to the embarrassment of calling someone by the wrong name is mispronouncing their name. People are usually too polite to correct you, so you just have to wonder whether you got it right, suffering in silence until the next time you hear somebody say it. …But what if THEY got it wrong, too??

There is a light at the end of your Sisyphean tunnel: via email on Thursday, Columbia unveiled the pilot of NameCoach, a third-party online tool that allows students to record their own names on CourseWorks to share with their classmates. The pilot version is available to students enrolled in any Arts & Sciences or Engineering class at Columbia’s Morningside campus.

The Registrar wrote in its email: “One’s name is an intrinsic and personal part of one’s identity. NameCoach facilitates our commitment to fostering an environment of inclusion, belonging, respect, and engagement, by empowering students and instructors to record and hear the correct name pronunciations of those in the class. We hope that this will cultivate familiarity in the classroom, even before classes start.”

Associate VP and Registrar Barry S. Kane emphasized that for students who use a preferred name at Columbia, NameCoach “completes that loop. Not only can a student request a preferred name, but they can specifically indicate how it should be pronounced,” he said over the phone.

Depending on the success of the program, the registrar will expand NameCoach to all of Columbia in the spring. Other schools like Barnard can decide independently if they want to adopt NameCoach. You can send feedback about the program to registrar@columbia.edu.

Here’s how to use NameCoach (images available on the registrar website):

  1. Log onto your Canvas via Chrome. (A Safari update is preventing Canvas from recording audio, but this should be fixed soon. In the meantime, you can use your phone recorder.)
  2. Go to one of your current classes that is using NameCoach. It should be the one with “NameCoach” at the bottom of the left sidebar.
  3. Click on “NameCoach.”
  4. Clock the “Record Name” button next to your name. It will give you an option to record on a web recorder or your phone.
  5. Once you record your name, it will automatically upload to all your classes that use NameCoach.
  6. Never have your name mispronounced again!
  7. I have been informed that I should not overpromise anything.
  8. Have your name mispronounced slightly less often!

And that’s Riva with an “I,” not an “E” via Wikimedia Commons

Apr

28

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img April 28, 20183:35 pmimg 6 Comments

Save them. Please.

This Friday, Bwog staffers attended the 124th Annual Varsity Show, a student-written and directed musical about life at Columbia. The verdict: a talented cast bogged down by mediocre writing and a lack of specificity.

If Alma Mater came to life one day, stretched her iron legs and dusted off her crown, turned her metal eye on the parade of students down College Walkwhat would she say? Would she be proud of this generation of Columbians? Would she understand our struggles? What would she do if an over-ambitious CCSC campaign promise led to massive embezzlement and a campus-wide power outage?

Luckily, this year’s Varsity Show, Lights Out on Broadway, is here to tell us. The play revolves around two candidates in a neck-and-neck race for CCSC president: Chelsea Shaw (Genevieve Joers, CC ’20), a hyper-competent, aspiring law student; and William Schermerhorn VIII (Talmage Wise, CC ’18), who wants to live up to his ancestors’ legacy by creating some name recognition. With the correct pronunciation.

To Chelsea’s dismay, William wins the election by promising an unlimited budget for all clubs. In order to fulfil his promise, William steals the key to the “Columbia vault” from his trustee uncle and embezzles massive amounts of money. Clubs are overjoyed, but the lack of budget leads to housing cutbacks. The dorms’ power goes out during reading week. Finally, Chelsea and her friends uncover William’s crime and successfully impeach him. Chelsea, for some reason, becomes president.

Read more after the jump

Apr

21

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img April 21, 20188:09 pmimg 0 Comments

Keep an ear out for the music of your friendly neighborhood Arts Editor!

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

On Campus:

  • KCST’s 2018 Spring Show, Hamlet, premieres this Thursday starting from Low Plaza. The show invites audience members to travel around campus, using all of Columbia as its stage. Join KCST in bringing new life to the world’s most famous play, as the tension between an established world of power and an ensemble of misremembered ghosts is stretched to the breaking point. See it for free Thursday and Saturday at 8:00 PM, or attend the midnight “drunk showing” on Friday.
  • Also this weekend, come to Roone Auditorium for Columbia’s oldest performing arts tradition: the 124th Annual Varsity Show, an original student musical that parodies life at Columbia. Tickets start at $8.50.
  • Tomorrow at 6:30 PM, head to Lerner Black Box for “Make it Tappen!”, UnTapped’s 2018 Spring Showcase. The show will feature three student-choreographed pieces, a collaboration with CU Bellydance, and live improvisation. Head there early to get on the waitlist to purchase tickets!
  • This weekend, the New Opera Workshop invites you to the Glicker-Milstein Theater for Die Fledermaus, a night of masquerading, champagne, and revenge! Performances are at 8pm on Friday, April 27th and Saturday, April 28th. Free for CUID holders.

Off Campus:

  • Tomorrow at 6 PM at Symphony Space, The Dancing Monks of Assam, India perform Sattriya: An Odyssey of the Spirit, a form of dance-drama performed to honor Vishnu in his flute-playing Krishna incarnation. Tickets start at $35.
  • This Wednesday, 7 PM at the Brooklyn Museum, join a panel of renowned curators, playwrights and actors for Conversation: Aristophanes and Political Satire. They will examine how the political plays of Aristophanes can question and criticize abuses of power in the modern age. Free RSVP here.

Bailey Coleman (BC ’19) strikes a pose via Wikimedia Commons

Apr

21

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img April 21, 20184:12 pmimg 0 Comments

They look beautiful, but they’ll turn you into a donkey.

This Friday, Arts Editor Riva Weinstein attended the dress rehearsal of Columbia Ballet Collaborative’s Spring Performances. The show featured work by Jerome Robbins, 5 original choreographers and 23 talented student dancers.

Dressed in black leotards and pink skirts, five dancers lounge around the onstage piano, their energy concentrated in the tips of their feet. Spontaneously – as if buffeted by the wind – they leap up in twos and threes to pirouette around the stage. Were it not for their breathing audible from the first row, it would be impossible to tell how much effort was put into the feather-light dance. This is 5+ Bach, by choreographer Michele Wiles, the first of six dances in CBC’s Spring Repertoire.

Hailed as one of the finest student groups for emerging talent in ballet, CBC spent the semester developing five dances, collaborations between professional and student choreographers and their dancers. The result is an electric mix of traditional and modern-inspired ballet set to classical music, eerie atonal compositions, and in one case, a cover of Hozier’s Cherry Wine.

Though all the original compositions were impressive, they failed to overshadow the third dance: Antique Epigraphs, by the legendary choreographer Jerome Robbins. Eight dancers in airy, flowing dresses drift around the stage, their delicate poses calling to mind a statue garden come to life. As the music grows more ominous, their movements become more urgent. Like the forest nymphs of myth, they are as dangerous as they are beautiful. The dance exudes a strange nostalgia for the Classical world of the Renaissance imagination – the world of Primavera and Birth of Venus, full of innocence and mysterious power.

And they just got wilder…

Apr

17

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In my scientific opinion, no one knows what the hell is going on in that long tube thing.

This Monday, Columbia hosted a colloquium with Dr. Kip Thorne, recipient of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics for co-founding the LIGO project. Arts Editor Riva Weinstein, who previously showed you how to one-up your cousin with Yugoslavian film trivia, hopes you too can use her newfound physics knowledge to impress your brilliant father even though you’re a humanities major and couldn’t tell a pulse wave from a periodic.

When Dr. Kip Thorne received a call at 2:15 A.M. one October morning with the news that he had been nominated for the Nobel Prize in Physics, the secretary general asked if he was surprised. “It doesn’t surprise me at all,” Dr. Thorne responded; “but I’m highly disappointed. It should have gone to the entire LIGO team.”

LIGO – the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory – is a pair of huge detectors which use laser interferometry to detect gravitational waves. Gravitational waves are ripples in space-time caused by the collision of incredibly distant, massive bodies (such as black holes). Their existence was prophesied by the great sage Albert Einstein in his 1916 general theory of relativity, but it wasn’t until 2015 that LIGO finally detected one.

Dr. Thorne is correct. LIGO is not the work of one, albeit brilliant, man. It is the project of hundreds of professors, grad students, postdocs and researchers. One of them is my father: Dr. Alan Weinstein, head of the LIGO data analysis group. Well, maybe Dr. Thorne was just jealous – for his own 20-year contribution to the project, my dad got a box of commemorative Nobel-shaped chocolate coins. Try chewing on that gold!

My father has always been highly supportive of my endeavors, including but not limited to drawing comics about Crime and Punishment and teaching Shakespearean actors to play the kazoo. Nonetheless, a time might never again come for me to impress him; and so, instead of doing something sensible, like composing choral Russian folk music, I headed down to Pupin on a Monday to listen to his old friend Dr. Thorne.

Okay, okay, now get to the science

Apr

14

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img April 14, 20187:53 pmimg 0 Comments

 

Me leading my drunk friend out of 1020.

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

On Campus:

  • This Tuesday at 8 PM, join Columbia Students for Justice in Palestine for Palestinian Cultural Night in Lerner Auditorium. The night will feature music, dance, fashion, speakers, food, merchandise and more. RSVP here.
  • This weekend, see CUP’s production of “Eurydice” by Sarah Ruhl. A play about love, loss and language, this reimagining of the Orpheus myth follows Eurydice as she descends into the underworld. Head to the GMT on Thursday, Friday or Saturday at 8 PM. $5.50 CUID tickets here.

 

Off Campus:

  • This Thursday through Friday, check out Artexpo New York 2018 in Hell’s Kitchen, where you’ll get an inside look at the innovations of more than 400 artists and galleries worldwide as they showcase their latest works. Student admission $15.
  • Next Sunday, April 22, head to the American Museum of Natural History for EarthFest, a museum-wide festival of art, science and culture in honor of Earth Day. Tours, films and art installations, performances, yoga and more! Free with museum admission.

Should’ve called CAVA via Wikimedia Commons

Apr

13

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My elementary school did Into The Woods Junior. It was just Act 1.

Arts Editor Riva Weinstein attended the Thursday night performance of CMTS’ Into The Woods (dir. Anna Moskowitz, BC ’19), by Stephen Sondheim. The verdict: a well-acted and impressively coordinated show, if you have the stamina to sit for two and a half hours of it.

At the center of the stage, a man in a long coat and glasses perches nervously, encircled by children’s books. While the audience files in, he picks up the books and reads from them one by one: a terrible witch, a prince who wanted to be a rooster… As the lights go down, he comes to the last book, with a black tree on the cover. The title: Into the Woods.

The moment that the narrator, Callum Kiser (CC ’21), begins his story, the stage explodes into action. Actors leap seamlessly in and out of the melody, swirling around the stage, shifting props and rapidly changing costumes. Each of our fairy-tale protagonists has a wish: Cinderella (India Beer, BC ’20) wishes to go to the ball; the Baker (Jacob Iglitzin, CC ’19) and his wife (Emma Smith, BC ’19) wish for a child; Jack (Tom Phelan, CC ’20) and his mother (Eliza Ducnuigeen, BC ’21) wish their cow would produce some milk; and Red Riding Hood (Erin Hilgartner, CC ’21) wishes to visit her grandmother (Sarah Hilligloss, BC ’21)… or, at least, uses it as a pretense for nabbing some food from the bakers’ house.

Hardly has Red Riding Hood gone on her way that a Witch (Eloise Bagnara, BC), the bakers’ neighbor, appears at their door. She reveals that she is responsible for making the Baker’s Wife barren – but the curse can be undone. Within three midnights, the couple must bring her four items: the cow as white as milk, the cape as red as blood, the hair as yellow as corn, and the slipper as pure as gold.

The what as what as what now?

Apr

8

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If my mom hadn’t cancelled my ballet classes when I was 5, I’d be in Moscow right now.

New York City is packed with amazing culture and inspiring art, but sometimes it’s difficult to break the Morningside-bubble and experience it all first-hand. “Where Art Thou” is a weekly guide to interesting and notable lectures, events, and performances for the literary/musically/theatrically-inclined on campus.

On Campus

  • This weekend, the Columbia Musical Theater Society (CMTS) presents Into the Woods at the Glicker-Milstein Theater! The classic Sondheim musical, featuring a mixup of fairytale characters from Little Red Riding Hood to Rapunzel, centers around a baker and his wife who accept a strange quest from a witch. See it Thursday, Friday or Saturday at 8 PM or Saturday at 2 PM. $5.50 CUID tickets here.
  • This Friday, April 13, the Columbia Journalism School is hosting a screening and Q&A with the screenwriters of the Oscar-nominated movie The Post. Starring Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks, The Post chronicles the Washington Post’s race with the New York Times to publish the Pentagon Papers in the 1970s. More info here.

Off Campus

  • This Saturday, April 14 at 8 PM, the CU Ballet Ensemble presents its spring production of Coppélia at the Manhattan Movement & Arts Center! This whimsical ballet tells the story of Coppélia, a life-sized doll brought to life by a mysterious doctor. Tickets start at $10.
  • Also on Saturday from 11:30 to 5 PM, celebrate the opening of Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960-1985 at the Brooklyn Museum. With a curation tour, performance and conversation, this program honors pioneering Latin American and Latina artists. See the full schedule and purchase tickets here.

Image via Spanish Wikipedia

Apr

6

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img April 06, 20186:55 pmimg 1 Comments

Spar was last spotted in front of Barnard Hall in the pouring rain, blasting James Blunt through a speaker and shouting “Take me back!”

Last year, Debora L. Spar resigned her position as 7th president of Barnard College. She was on her way to bigger and better things, like the presidency of Lincoln Center (the complex which hosts the New York Philharmonic, Metropolitan Opera, and many other performing arts organizations). This was a fantastic opportunity by any standards, so the Barnard community saw her off into this new chapter of her life with gratitude and respect.

This Friday, she quit.

In a New York Times article released this morning, DSpar was quoted as saying: “Moving from academia to the performing arts world pushed me to think, learn and lead in new ways. While we have achieved a lot together over the past year, I have also questioned whether the role is right for me. As I looked back on the last 12 months, I ultimately determined that the fit I’d hoped for has not materialized. It is for this reason that I have decided it is best for the organization for me to step aside.”

She is not the first Lincoln Center president to resign suddenly. Her predecessor, Jed Bernstein, was forced to step down after 27 months. Gordon J. Davis resigned in 2001 after only 9 months. Seems like a more stressful job than managing a women’s liberal arts college, though that’s hard to imagine.

DSpar’s tenure as president was marked primarily by an unsuccessful attempt to renovate the New York Philharmonic’s David Geffen Hall, due to a lack of support from wealthy donors. Lincoln Center announced in October that they were proceeding with a simplified plan to improve the hall.

After the article was posted on the Facebook page Overheard @ Barnard, DSpar received no shortage of smug comments from Barnard students. “WHOSE TREES WILL BE DESTROYED NEXT?? FIND OUT AFTER THE BREAK,” said Nina Gonzalez Silas. “When corporate feminism does you dirty in the end,” quipped Victoria Martinez.

Poor DSpar. Let’s hope she finds a new organization to be president of soon – a nice, non-stressful one with very few trees.

My bad on that one via Wikimedia Commons

Apr

5

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WWJD? (What Would Judith Do?)

Ever worried your academic writing isn’t quite up to scratch? Never fear: Arts Editor Riva Weinstein is here to break down the average humanities paper and show you how to write like a true PhD!

HOW TO WRITE A LITERARY ANALYSIS

  1. To compile my title, I’ve run my chosen text through a paper shredder along with the Communist Manifesto, Freud’s Civilization and its Discontents, and any New Yorker op-ed. The result is something along the lines of “The Cultural Super-Ego in Pride and Prejudice’s Critical-Utopian Landscape and Population Dynamics, Revisited.”
  2. So I’m going to say this normal word, right? And then I’m going to say it again, but this time… get this… it’s in quotation marks. That’s how you know I’m talking about the reified epistemological concept of a canine, not a dog.
  3. Those of you who escaped immediate heart failure at seeing the page count of this paper: Good news! Half of it is a single block quote.
  4. Though I don’t mean to jump to conclusions, some of this material may be leading me in the general direction of… Marxism.
  5. I’m not really sure if I interpreted these 6 Judith Butler quotes correctly, but as it turns out, in literary analysis you can say pretty much anything you want.
  6. In conclusion: The culture! The landscape! The cultural landscape! I’m done.

 

HOW TO WRITE AN ARCHAEOLOGY PAPER

  1. So you know that [time period/historical figure/material culture/site/artifact] that everyone says is one thing, right? Well get this: it’s actually some OTHER thing.
  2. What is this other thing, you ask? Well, it’s not aliens, hahahahahahahahahahahaha. Oh boy, that would be funny. No. Nope. It’s the Postprocessual re-membering of the socially constituted dividual. It is not aliens.
  3. Anyway, here’s some bones from a cave in northern Ireland.
  4. The bones mean nothing, because they’re specific and my argument is super general.
  5. My argument also means nothing, because it’s general and reality is super specific.
  6. Here’s the entire results of my field program: 3,216 potsherds and a watch somebody left in the dig site last weekend. If the university tries to cut my funding, I’m going to start offing undergraduates one by one.
  7. Here’s 622 more made-up words, 4 Judith Butler quotes, and a subtle reminder that the past is gone and we’re all hurtling into oblivion, day by day.
  8. I’m going to go ahead and say the word aliens a few more times, because that’s the only way I can get non-archaeologists to read this paper.
  9. In conclusion, fuck V. Gordon Childe.

Other subjects (and more Butler) after the jump!

Apr

4

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Welcome to Elliott!

For transfers and rising sophomores and juniors at Barnard, Elliott Hall is a convenient, if small, dorm located on Claremont.

Location: 49 Claremont (corner of 119th)

Nearby dorms: The Quad, the 600s

Stores and restaurants: Everything in the immediate Columbia/Barnard Broadway area: MoWill, the food trucks, Pret, Shake Shack, Starbucks, Sweetgreen, UPS/FedEx, etc.

Cost: Check the Barnard Housing page in late April for the prices of all Barnard rooms.

Amenities:

  • Bathrooms: One gender-inclusive and one women’s restroom on each floor.
  • AC/Heating: Central air conditioning and manual heaters, though I’m told they get too hot if you leave them on for over an hour.
  • Kitchen: Two shared kitchens per floor, on either side of the lounge.
  • Lounges: TV/study lounge on each floor.
  • Laundry: 4 washer/dryer sets in the basement.
  • Computers/Printers: One computer and one printer are located in the lobby.
  • Gym: Barnard Hall’s weight room isn’t too far.
  • Elevators: 1 elevator.
  • Flooring: Carpet in halls, linoleum tile floor in the rooms.

What are the rooms like though? (Hint: clusters are involved, and not the granola kind)

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